Dufresne

Test your Autism Spectrum Quotient

60 posts in this topic

I finally got around to doing this and got a 35. It took me a month to remember my cell phone number...

And you still got such a high score! How do you guys do it? :P

Reminds me of the philosophy test: I got 100% Ayn Rand and 98% Aristotle, then I forwarded it to a liberal-leaning friend and he got 100% Kant. Even though I had debated with him before and was quite familiar with his views, it took me ages to figure out which wrong answers to give in order to get 100% Kant! :D

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20, seems about right. Couple of interesting questions about imagination there.

Nice example of severe autistic childs inability to imagine/empath in the following situation: three boxes and a ball in front of two children - one is autistic. A man puts the ball in one box, and asks the children to tell him which box the other child thinks the balls in. Each child is then asked to leave the room whilst the other stays and watches the man take the ball out of one box and put it in another. The child is then asked where the child coming back in the room thinks the ball is. The normal child points at the box the ball was originally in, the autistic child points at the box the ball was put in when the other child left - unable to comphrehend what the situation must look like from the other childs perspective.

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Nice example of severe autistic childs inability to imagine/empath in the following situation: three boxes and a ball in front of two children - one is autistic. A man puts the ball in one box, and asks the children to tell him which box the other child thinks the balls in. Each child is then asked to leave the room whilst the other stays and watches the man take the ball out of one box and put it in another. The child is then asked where the child coming back in the room thinks the ball is. The normal child points at the box the ball was originally in, the autistic child points at the box the ball was put in when the other child left - unable to comphrehend what the situation must look like from the other childs perspective.

Or, the "autistic" child was really clever, and empathetic as well. Putting himself into the perspective of the child who leaves the room ... why would the man ask him which box the ball was in, unless he had moved it from the original and was trying to trick him? After all, why bother to ask if he knows that you know which box the ball was originally in? Hence, a clever child might pick the box opposite of the original, and the "autistic" child was being both empathetic and clever.

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I think the experimenter would have said something to the children a long the lines of 'Don't try to be clever - it probably seems as if Im stating the obvious, just answer the question anyway!'.

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I think the experimenter would have said something to the children a long the lines of 'Don't try to be clever - it probably seems as if Im stating the obvious, just answer the question anyway!'.

That assumes the experimenters in this area are as clever as the children. I've met a few, and I will put my money on the "autistic" children.

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That assumes the experimenters in this area are as clever as the children. I've met a few, and I will put my money on the "autistic" children.

I'm curious - are you putting autistic in scare quotes because of the children in the particular example who may or may not be autistic, or because you're generally skeptical of autism as a condition, or ...?

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That assumes the experimenters in this area are as clever as the children. I've met a few, and I will put my money on the "autistic" children.

I'm curious - are you putting autistic in scare quotes because of the children in the particular example who may or may not be autistic, or because you're generally skeptical of autism as a condition, or ...?

I was referring to the example, and to those of like kind. I have little doubt of the existence of several forms of autism.

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I got a 16 on my first try. I than took the test again but didn't read the questions. I used the same answer for each question and got a 25. I did this for all four answers and the score was 25 each time. I than alternated between the two extremes stongly agree and stongly disagree and scored a 22. When I alternated between slightly agree and slightly disagree my scores were 28 and 28.

I don't know what this means but thought it was an interesting discovery.

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I got a 17...so I guess that makes me an "average man" hahah, pretty good for a girl.

I have a nephew with Asperger's and another nephew (different sibling of mine is the parent) that has sever austism. This test is a joke, as others say, so out of context it means nothing. In fact, all you would have to do is change a few of the questions and the title and you could call it the "ADD Spectrum Quotient", or better yet, change a few lines, zip it up with some fashionable buzzwords and throw it in Cosmo and call it "Your Social Spectrum Quotient" or, maybe "Are you a Party Animal or Nerdy Girl?"

soo not scientific hahah.

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Just scrolling through old parts of the forum... I picked myself up a 41 :lol:

No surprises there... My psychiatrists have been telling me I have Autism for years.

And you won't see me at the Library of Congress... unless it's an animated argument with the curator (?) about giving back the original covers of The Fountainhead.

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12

... (gee, I didn't know I'd become such a social animal. Now, if I could only remember names...)

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I scored a 39, but I already know I have Asperger's syndrome.

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I got a 26, which doesn't really surprise me.

12, it did not really surprise me. I have always been more of a social person than a scholar.

About the ambiguity of the questions, you guys have to remember that it is very hard to put in every contextual fact on these tests, there are entirely too many. My only problem with this test is it was very very repetitive.

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12, it did not really surprise me. I have always been more of a social person than a scholar.

About the ambiguity of the questions, you guys have to remember that it is very hard to put in every contextual fact on these tests, there are entirely too many. My only problem with this test is it was very very repetitive.

I don’t think the two are mutually exclusive. Socrates is a great example of someone who was both a scholar and very social. Ben Franklin is another.

I said my score was not a surprise because I know about my anxiety meeting new people and being in crowds. I don’t know if the “Autism Spectrum Quotient” is a valid measure of Autism (it doesn’t seem to be) but it does seem to be a roughly accurate measure of being an introvert vs. extrovert. I’ve always been an introvert.

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Thomas Sowell wrote a recent two-part article in which he warns against the current trend toward the over-diagnosis of autism and the harm that it does to both parents and children. In it he takes issue with the whole notion of an "autism spectrum disorder."

The very definition of autism has been expanded in recent years to include what is called "the autism spectrum." What this means, among other things, is that there is now far more wiggle room for those whose diagnoses have proved to be wrong, who refuse to admit it, and who are now even more unaccountable than ever.

and

People today are often spoken of as being "on the autistic spectrum," rather than as having autism.

While there are some conditions which are much like autism, there are other conditions, such as having a very high IQ or simply being late in talking, which often include characteristics listed on checklists for autism. These are open invitations to false diagnoses.

We would see the dangers immediately if people who wear glasses were included on "the blindness spectrum" or people with harmless moles were included on "the cancer spectrum."

The columns are here and here.

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My own critique is similar to Thomas Sowell's. The checklists and quizzes focus on the end results and behaviours rather than the underlying causes.

For instance the comment earlier about extrovert and introvert. It is true that an introvert would get a score similar to an autistic because the end results are quite similar. However, what gives rise to those answers in an introvert are often vastly different to the reasons an autistic would give.

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