Stephen Speicher

Pearl Harbor (2001)

Rate this movie   6 votes

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7 posts in this topic

This was showing a few minutes ago on ABC; I have seen it before, though. I wanted it added to the "You Rate It" forum because I am just so moved by the spirit of the Americans of that time as portrayed in this movie.

Warning: There are spoilers about this movie in this post.

There is a scene where FDR is meeting with his military staff to discuss retaliation for the attack that moves me in particular. He is told by staff member after staff member that an immediate and strong attack on Japan is impossible. In response, FDR struggles out of his wheel chair and onto his legs, and says "Do not tell me it cannot be done." Soon after his staff put together a daring mission, the Doolittle raid, consisting of launching B-25 bombers off of the aircraft carrier the USS Hornet within range of the Japan.

Another scene that I like is when Alec Baldwin's character, leader of the bombers in the Doolittle Raid, says something along the lines of (in the run-up to the raid, looking at his young pilots): "I'm not worried about the fate of our country. You know why? Because of them. They are exceptional. To see them rise up in these trying times... there's nothing like the heart of a volunteer."

In a cynical world bent on spitting on everything good about America, and where politicians are mindless opportunists, it's such a treat to see a movie projecting that proud, ferocious, righteous sense of life that our leaders once had.

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The problem is that FDR did not have the type of spirit that they show him having. He was probably one of the worst presidents of the last century.

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I gave this movie a 0. It is a bad love-story conveniently placed in context with the attack on Pearl Harbor. I cannot see any value in it at all.

Rather I would recommend the movie "Tora! Tora! Tora!" from 1970. It is a considerably better movie, both regarding its' theme and as a source to learn the history of the attack. The theme is that Japan had absolutely no chance at hurting the U.S. Rather it was the mistakes that the military and political commanders of the U.S. made, that made it possible for the japanese to hurt us.

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This is a bad movie, which was made less of a war movie specifically in order to sell in Japan. Shameful. The scene in the hospital is specifically filmed blurred in order to not upset Japanese viewers.

The Doolitle raid is a great story, but by the time it unfolds, the movie is beyond repai.

Rather I would recommend the movie "Tora! Tora! Tora!" from 1970. It is a considerably better movie, both regarding its' theme and as a source to learn the history of the attack.

I agree - this is a great movie.

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Yeah, I agree the movie pretty much stinks. Especially because a love story takes center stage over Pearl Harbor. I caught it on TV half-way through, when the Dolittle raid was on. I wish someone in modern times would do justice to the war in the Pacific.

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Yeah, I agree the movie pretty much stinks. Especially because a love story takes center stage over Pearl Harbor. I caught it on TV half-way through, when the Dolittle raid was on. I wish someone in modern times would do justice to the war in the Pacific.

I couldn't even sit through the whole movie. Not only was it bad in the sense of misrepresenting an important historical event in our nation's history, and bad by the standards of film as an art form in general, but it also did a really bad job of capturing the spirit of the era-- the electricity of American culture at that time, as compared to now. I gave the movie a "2."

I couldn't help but laugh at the scene in South Park creators' movie Team America, in which a ruthless criticism of this film was worked into the lyrics of a love song.

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