Stephen Speicher

Akeelah and the Bee (2006)

Rate this movie   8 votes

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6 posts in this topic

A real surprise for me. This was one terrific film. Interesting characters, especially the eleven-year-old Akeelah who is the focus of the very well-plotted story. A really spirited film that, as long as you are alive, will leave you feeling good about the world. Definitely worth your time in enjoyment.

Warning: BIG spoiler discussed below. Please don't read unless you've seen the film.

Towards the end of the film we pick up the sense that Akeelah is thinking of letting Dylan win, and inside myself I was sceaming NO! NO!, don't ruin this great story. When she deliberately lost I felt I was brought down to the depths of hell. But, then, in a stroke of incredible genius story writing, from this pile of ashes arose a climax that reached a greater height of joy than I ever could have imagined in the story ending that I had wanted. This was a brilliant plot twist that profoundly affected my emotions.

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I just came back from seeing this movie and I agree wholeheartedly. It's a terrific, heartwarming movie.

Anyone who complains about good movies not being made anymore should see this as a counter to that argument.

Objectivists would be particularly interested because the movie makes a very good point that a conceptual approach to language gives you the key to understanding ideas, as against the approach of rote memorization.

But a better reason to see it is that the heroine is a cute, plucky little girl who learns to embrace her own genius against all kinds of opposition.

I'm also not sure how to rank this movie on the 1-10 scale because I gave Goal! an 8, and Akeelah is a better movie, but 9 is something that I reserve for great movies like On the Waterfront. I wish I could give it an 8.5.

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I loved this movie! The sense of joy in this movie is infectious. I was really stressed out and exhausted from work, having just met a big deadline, and left work early to go see it. Wow! I was more invigorated and eager to go do Really Big Things in life then I've been in some time. I gave it a 9 and second the recommendations. (I reserve 10 for the real classics, so 9 is really good!)

My one complaint is on the technical side of the story. I generally prefer movies with deep values in conflict, and I didn't get that sense from this movie. Yes, conflict exists, but I never felt that the values the young heroine pursues are ever in danger. Instead, I would describe it as a thorough sense of living in a benevolent universe: you can pursue goals and achieve them. There are some nice technical touches here and there, but overall the plot is really pretty simple: young girl wants to compete in spelling bee. There's not much plot complexity, which is fine for a kid's movie.

So my enthusiasm really is for the spirit of this film which just overflows from it.

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I just saw it today and yes, this is definitely a good one! An inspiring depiction of somebody pursuing important values in the face of adversity. And it was also interesting seeing how she was learning to spell so many words correctly.

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I usually reserve the theaters for special effect type movies, so I am usually far behind on reviewing these.

I can watch this type of storyline endlessly.

The sequence that caused Mr. Speicher so much apprehension and Ed's only criticism could have both been brought out in that scene. But I don't think that the drive of the movie was as much of a dramatization of values as it was a sense of life sketch. The potential conflicts were present in the movie, and could be inferred, but they never met in actual conflict. I would like to see such a thing done explicitly on an adult level. Maybe I'll do it myself.

I loved the boy that was enamored with her, simply adorable.

I was almost done watching the movie before I realized that I had seen two of the main characters in a much, much different movie: Angela Bissett and Lawrence Fishbourne in What's Love Got to do With It?

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