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More on Maynard Ferguson

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Triumph !

Maynard's music is nothing less than triumph personified. When Maynard was on stage, and he planted his feet and lifted his horn straight up into the air, every fan in that concert hall knew what was coming: Triumph.

See rest of quote from article by Matt Keller at:

http://www.maynardferguson.com

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Triumph !

See rest of quote from article by Matt Keller at:

http://www.maynardferguson.com

Thanks for the link to this article. I heard the news that Maynard had died, yesterday while driving home, and I slowed down almost to a stop. I don't think I'd ever heard anything as exciting as the 'L-Dopa' album, which is the first time I heard him. And anybody who wants to hear someone turning pop standards into a thrill ride, just check out the 'Stony End' album. It's hard to describe if you've never heard Ferguson play, but you'll never forget it. He didn't just squeal powerful high notes, like Cat Anderson of Dizzy Gillespie's orchestra (phenomenal in his own way, of course), but Ferguson just sailed up with perfect legato, in a continuous stream of sound. Later on, he got a little excessive. I saw him in concert in the early 80's and he was almost anti-climactic, with one high note after another at every opportunity, but even that was fun, because, as the guy said in the article, he was so obviously having the time of his life onstage. Listen to his earlier albums and you'll hear amazing taste, musicianship, and timing. What an impact. And the 'generosity' described in the article also came through: He hired great musicians. Just check out Phil Woods' solo on the title track of 'Stony End'.

This is a love letter. I loved his playing and the joy of making music that came through his every note. There is no one like him. He will be missed.

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Listen to his earlier albums and you'll hear amazing taste, musicianship, and timing. What an impact. This is a love letter. I loved his playing and the joy of making music that came through his every note. There is no one like him. He will be missed.

I was saddened also when a trumpeter friend emailed me about Maynard's death. I had the good fortune to have Maynard as the featured artist at a Jazz Festival that I was Music Director of three summers ago. It was held on a public square in a small town. Musicians and especially brassmen came from all around to hear him. It was an outdoor evening concert in July and very hot and humid. The place was packed with several thousand people, shoulder-to-shoulder, standing-room-only, and the atmosphere was electric. When the 76-year-old Maynard came on stage, the place went crazy and the audience started pressing the stage. The security people started to panic, but things calmed down quickly. In spite of the heat and humidity, Maynard played wonderfully and the band was superb. He was generous enough to sign autographs after a very grueling performance. I got his autographs on my old Roulette LP recordings of Message From Newport, Newport Suite and Maynard '61. It was a trill for me and my own personal tribute to him to have him at the festival. It is a wonderful memory.

His recordings on Roulette Records in the late '50's and early '60s were some of his best. His rendition of Bernstein's Maria is breathtaking. One of my favorites from his years with Stan Kenton is Invention for Guitar and Trumpet with guitarist Sal Salvador. His playing on Kenton's Prologue is also amazing. The first time I heard it when I was in high school. I thought he was the violin section. He put out two very fine recordings on Cameo Records in the late '60's. He did great work later on Columbia. One my favorites from this era was his version of Sesame Street. I think it is on the album, Storm. It will definitely get you going in the morning! His music, though in the jazz idiom, was definitely romantic.

There is an old video of him playing with Stan Kenton at:

http://www.dailymotion.com/visited/search/...ith-stan-kenton

I think it was eventually recorded on the Kenton album, Stan Kenton Presents.

He must have still been a teenager at the time. I love his confident look and smile. He is obviously having a great time!

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There is an old video of him playing with Stan Kenton at:

http://www.dailymotion.com/visited/search/...ith-stan-kenton

That piece is not one of my favorites, but what a treat it was to see a young Boss playing like that. Thanks!

I think his style became much more refined, and versatile as years went by. I would guess he was in his very early twenties at that session, maybe 1952 or so. What a jacket!

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That piece is not one of my favorites, but what a treat it was to see a young Boss playing like that. Thanks!

I think his style became much more refined, and versatile as years went by. I would guess he was in his very early twenties at that session, maybe 1952 or so. What a jacket!

True. The pitch was moving around and at times the notes he played didn't fit the underlying harmony. But, it makes it because of his astounding sound, power, range, flexibility, and technique. A diamond in the rough! He does things that border on being impossible on a brass instrument.

I think his best and most consistent work was in the early sixties when he was recording on Roulette: Maynard 61', Newport Suite, A Message From Newport, and several others. I love his version of Sesame Street, which I think came out in the '80's on Columbia. If you get a chance, check out his version of Maria. I think it is on Maynard '62, on Roulette.

Sad to say, I think his was the last surviving band that came out of the Swing Era. There are some great studio bands that are put together for recordings by wonderful writers like Bob Curnow, Rob McConnell, Bob Mintzer and others. There are also some very good ghost bands like the Woody Herman and Count Basie bands.

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I've never really heard a lot of jazz, but the comments here about Maynard Fergusen have got me interested. In fact, this morning I went to a local thrift shop and searched through their old LP's and found----- Storm, 1983, with only one slight scratch, for two dollars. I'll listen to it later today; well, maybe a few minutes from now. I'll thank everyone in advance for what I hope is a great musical adventure. I'll let you know.

Brian

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I've never really heard a lot of jazz, but the comments here about Maynard Fergusen have got me interested. In fact, this morning I went to a local thrift shop and searched through their old LP's and found----- Storm, 1983, with only one slight scratch, for two dollars. I'll listen to it later today; well, maybe a few minutes from now. I'll thank everyone in advance for what I hope is a great musical adventure. I'll let you know.

Glenn is a great deal more knowledgeable of jazz than me, and he can make many suggestions, but you should know that there are several great jazz musicians from the era of Maynard Ferguson. Gerry Mulligan, for instance, on the baritone sax, is magnificent.

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Glenn is a great deal more knowledgeable of jazz than me, and he can make many suggestions, but you should know that there are several great jazz musicians from the era of Maynard Ferguson. Gerry Mulligan, for instance, on the baritone sax, is magnificent.

Okay. I'll keep my eyes open for Mulligan (I assume he's not related to the banker :) ).

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Oh yes, Sesame Street is a lot of fun! For me, it's the best of Storm.

I think it is the best one one the album too.

That album may be worth some money if it is in good shape.

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Gerry Mulligan, for instance, on the baritone sax, is magnificent.

Gerry Mulligan was a great one. He was a fine writer too and in addition to his small groups fronted a big band for a while. My favorite album by him is The Gerry Mulligan Quartet-What Is There To Say, Columbia LP 1307. I believe it was recorded only in mono, although it has probably been remasterd in stereo and is now available on CD. I found a mint condition copy of it at The Goodwill Store for $3.00. It has an interesting tune on it by Gerry called Festive Minor.

I'll thank everyone in advance for what I hope is a great musical adventure. I'll let you know. B.Royce

There are so many great jazz players.

Dave Brubeck's Time Out is a classic and I think very listenable. I also like Miles Davis's Kind of Blue, which features Miles Davis, Cannonball Adderly, John Coltrane, Bill Evans, Wynton Kelly and other greats.

I love the Count Basie Band and Woody Herman Orchestra, especially his recordings in the sixties which featured the great lead and solo trumpet of Bill Chase. Dizzy Gillespie also conducted a great big band in the late '50s.

Bill Evans is my favorite jazz pianist, followed close by Oscar Peterson and Chick Corea. I love Chick's Acoustic Band albums. Then there is Art Tatum who is in a class all his own.

Although I was not a musician at the time, I started out listening to my parents' Glenn Miller, Tommy Dorsey, & Benny Goodman albums. I moved to Dixieland and then on to the more jazz oriented big bands like Basie, Buddy Rich, & Maynard Ferguson when I was in high school. At the same time I was listening to Dave Brubeck (whose tune Take Five was actually a hit and played on the local radio stations at the time). The more I listened the more I started hearing things that I had not heard before. At first I liked only big band music. As I studied music and my ear developed, I started enjoying players like Charlie Parker, Miles Davis, John Coltrane, Sonny Rollins & Dizzy Gillespie.

Of course, everyone is going to have different tastes in music.

Discovering new music is an adventure. I love to go out to the Goodwill Stores, and antique shops and see what turns up. I once found 20 unopend Deutsche Grammophon albums of Mozart works at a Good Will Store. They were .50 per album. I also found almost all of the High-Lo's albums ever recorded in an antique store in Gatlinburg, TN.

Now with download services like Rhapsody, you can just punch in artist names or song titles and listen to complete selections for around $10.00 a month. Or you can punch in a music form name like passacaglia and see what comes up. I have discovered some great pieces and composers using this method that I had previously not known.

I've also started converting my most valuable and out of print LPs to CD format using an inexpesive, nice program and external sound card made by Sound Blaster.

Have fun!

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Wow, I am amazed that he is dead. He was such a force on stage when I saw him at Jazz Alley a few years ago. Thank you for the links.

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Bill Evans is my favorite jazz pianist ...

Evans is a truly amazing musician, whose work I dearly love and admire, but...

Then there is Art Tatum who is in a class all his own.

I know I've bored too many people with this. But I just can't resist.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Art_Tatum

Art Tatum was a unique, American musical genius. I am very happy to see Glenn mention his name in this context. I recommend to anyone to at least listen to some samples from his "Solo Masterpiece" albums or the "Group Masterpiece" albums. His astounding virtuosity is not for everyone's taste. But it might at least be worth the experience of hearing it once.

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