Stephen Speicher

The Prestige (2006)

Rate this movie   9 votes

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6 posts in this topic

I was really looking forward to this movie, but, despite the film being done quite well, ultimately I was disappointed. The production values were good, the acting was fine, and there were very intriguing plot twists. Unfortunately, I just could not care for any of the characters in a personal way. With The Illusionist, another magician-oriented period piece that came out a short while before this film, I actually rooted for success of the characters, but with The Presitige their was little to root for.

In short, a nicely made film with an interesting plot, but not much of a sense of life enjoyment for me.

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I was really looking forward to this movie, but, despite the film being done quite well, ultimately I was disappointed. The production values were good, the acting was fine, and there were very intriguing plot twists. Unfortunately, I just could not care for any of the characters in a personal way. With The Illusionist, another magician-oriented period piece that came out a short while before this film, I actually rooted for success of the characters, but with The Presitige their was little to root for.

In short, a nicely made film with an interesting plot, but not much of a sense of life enjoyment for me.

I saw it on opening night, and your post just about sums it up.

As director, Nolan style is looser here than he was in Batman Begins. He shakes the camera unnecessarily in the first 20 minutes of the movie. His visual stylization is quite good but not yet exceptional; still, he's a brilliant director with many years ahead. His pace and timing are on the mark.

Christian Bale and Hugh Jackman seemed hamstrung by the characterization, especially Jackman. He seemed to have a hard time keeping up with Bale in the first half-hour, but eventually found his footing.

Johanssen had a hard time pulling off an English accent, and it showed. On the other hand, David Bowie was very sharp - I really liked his Tesla.

The late-in-the-day introduction of mysticism killed the build-up, and I think that was the sorest point really.

One of the best films of the year, but Nolan has set such a high bar in such a short time that his fans now expect perfection.

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This is my favourite movie of the year. Absolutely excellent in scripting and acting. I saw nothing mystical or anti-life about it at all. Thematically it dealt with the difference in the two magicians' motivations. Borden was cunning and self-motivated, and enjoyed engineering new tricks. Angier was a second-hander who thrived on the audience's reaction and admiration.

It's no Fountainhead (nor, indeed, quite as good as Batman Begins), but I put it on a lower tier of excellence. I hope those planning to see this did not change their minds based on previous reviews here; I do not regret spending money to see this film twice.

My view may be strongly biased by my extreme admiration of Christian Bale, from both Batman Begins and Equilibrium (two of my favourite movies).

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This is my favourite movie of the year. Absolutely excellent in scripting and acting. I saw nothing mystical or anti-life about it at all. Thematically it dealt with the difference in the two magicians' motivations. Borden was cunning and self-motivated, and enjoyed engineering new tricks. Angier was a second-hander who thrived on the audience's reaction and admiration.

It's no Fountainhead (nor, indeed, quite as good as Batman Begins), but I put it on a lower tier of excellence. I hope those planning to see this did not change their minds based on previous reviews here; I do not regret spending money to see this film twice.

My view may be strongly biased by my extreme admiration of Christian Bale, from both Batman Begins and Equilibrium (two of my favourite movies).

I don't think the point about mysticism has to do with any themes in the film, just that something occurs which is not physically possible (I won't name it to avoid a spoiler). Had the movie established a universe where that sort of thing was possible, like The Lord of the Rings, where magic is basically technology stemming from the nature of existence, it would have been fine. But the film does no such thing, so the impossible occurrence is quite jarring.

The explanation for the Christian Bale character's premier trick ("The Transported Man") was disappointing, though that's really disappointment with myself because I should have been able to figure it out long before it was revealed, and didn't. On reflection I realized that sufficient clues were there - I just (uncharacteristically) missed them. I hate when that happens. B)

Getting back to the impossible thing, it didn't destroy the film for me, but it did damage it. In addition, I, too, had difficulty caring for the characters. On the plus side, David Bowie was very good (I didn't even know it was him until the closing credits), the plot twists were intriguing, and I've never seen Scarlett Johanssen more attractive (I didn't recognize her, either).

What hurt the film most for me was what happened to Borden at the end (again, I won't detail anything). It was incomprehensible to me that anyone would allow that to happen, knowing that he didn't have to and could prove it.

A good, but not great, film.

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I just recently saw this film for the first time, and while it's not really memorable for the long-term, I thought it was interesting -- and I agree that you can't like the main characters much, but I think that they both kind of get what they deserve in the end

death (for Angiers) and loneliness and unhappiness for Borden

. I mean, I couldn't care for a guy (Borden) who didn't seem bothered by how much he had to do with

the death of Robert Angier's wife, eve if he was not directly responsible. And the character that was even more responsible gets hanged in the end.

I think it was all very neatly-wrapped, plot-wise, and even moral in its way in a negative-object-lesson kind of way. Maybe I just liked it because I guessed about half way through how Borden did the trick. I never would have guessed in a theater. But when I watch movies at home, if I fail to understand what is happening, I back up the DVD until I understand what happened. I'd probably never make it through The French Connection. Films like that always leave me in the dust.

And if anyone ever really understands the plot of The Big Sleep I'd love to hear about it. I've seen that four times, and I can never quite understand how each little bit goes with all the others, though it's a great film for dialog in any case, which is my favorite part of great movies.

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