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Fountainhead DVD - Highly Recommended!

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Just received mine today from Amazon. Haven't had time to watch the feature yet, but I did watch the Special Feature "THE MAKING OF THE FOUNTAINHEAD."

This featurette is worth the price of the DVD itself. It's attributed to John Little and Robert Anderson, and I am bowled over by the result. Unless I missed something it's an absolutely respectful tribute to both Ayn Rand and the movie, and has a lot of interesting data that I've never seen before. In fact, it's a great summary of the point of the book and stands alone as an introduction to the film and book.

I was prepared for the usual Hollywood mishmash and snide remarks in the review featurette, but they thank Leonard Piekoff and Mike Mentzer for their input (not sure who Mentzer is) so the writers obviously did their homework.

Can't wait to watch the movie now in DVD quality for the first time. Mine is the "standard version" so I am wondering if we're still missing the wide screen version, but so far it looks great anyway.

HIGHLY RECOMMENDED.

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Can't wait to watch the movie now in DVD quality for the first time. Mine is the "standard version" so I am wondering if we're still missing the wide screen version, but so far it looks great anyway.

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I can't speak specifically, but movies were originally in the 4:3 aspect ratio. That's why the TV was that ratio when it first came out. Movies later changed to the wide screen format. I don't know the dates involved, but it was around the late 40's early 50's. The 1939 version of The Wizard of Oz is in the 4:3 ratio so there is no widescreen format.

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Just received mine today from Amazon. Haven't had time to watch the feature yet, but I did watch the Special Feature "THE MAKING OF THE FOUNTAINHEAD."

This featurette is worth the price of the DVD itself. It's attributed to John Little and Robert Anderson, and I am bowled over by the result. Unless I missed something it's an absolutely respectful tribute to both Ayn Rand and the movie, and has a lot of interesting data that I've never seen before. In fact, it's a great summary of the point of the book and stands alone as an introduction to the film and book.

I was prepared for the usual Hollywood mishmash and snide remarks in the review featurette, but they thank Leonard Piekoff and Mike Mentzer for their input (not sure who Mentzer is) so the writers obviously did their homework.

Can't wait to watch the movie now in DVD quality for the first time. Mine is the "standard version" so I am wondering if we're still missing the wide screen version, but so far it looks great anyway.

HIGHLY RECOMMENDED.

Like Paul's Here said, the widescreen format did not come into being until later--generally. Exceptions were The Big Trail, with John Wayne, from the 1930's(!), Napoleon from 1926 (a precursor to Cinerama and even split-screen), and, I believe, the original version of D.O.A., from 1949.

Anyway, I recently watched my DVD of The Fountainhead (the movie itself) and I thought it was terrific! The visual quality of the DVD is tons better than that of the VHS copies I've seen (and it looks to me like a restoration of the actual film was done, probably for the purpose of the DVD release).

The Fountainhead is one of my favorite movies. I know Ayn Rand was not tremendously pleased with it (she didn't dislike it, either, as far as I know), and didn't think it was up to the standard of the German Romantic films she loved so much, but I think, despite certain failings, that it's a very good film, and, yes, that it does stand up to the standard of the German films, that is, the ones I've seen, almost all of which are by Fritz Lang. The visual composition of shots in The Fountainhead is something you rarely, if ever, see today.

Just one example: In the scene when Howard Roark is about to get his first commission--which he declines when the board spokesman tells Roark that the board wants him to "adapt" his building, etc.--he is challenging the board's premises in regard to architecture--and Man. When doing so, he is on one side of the frame and the spokesman is on the other. Between them is the "adapted" model of Roark's building. The building divides the two men.

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The visual composition of shots in The Fountainhead is something you rarely, if ever, see today.

One master of visual composition agrees. According to the April 1999 issue of In Style, director Steven Spielberg loves the film version of The Fountainhead, which he views as a hymn to artistic integrity and has seen more than ten times.

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