Paul's Here

I Hate Raking

21 posts in this topic

Well, my wife and I just got done today with raking for this year. It's the thing I hate most about owning a home. Raking and mowing rank 1 and 2 in hateable chores. I used to pay my son, but he's off to college this year. I tried using my friends son, but he didn't want to do it this weekend. So we ended up doing it. It took about 8 39-gallon trash bags today. I'm thinking of cutting down some trees. Now we await the snow!!

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Well, my wife and I just got done today with raking for this year. It's the thing I hate most about owning a home. Raking and mowing rank 1 and 2 in hateable chores. I used to pay my son, but he's off to college this year. I tried using my friends son, but he didn't want to do it this weekend. So we ended up doing it. It took about 8 39-gallon trash bags today. I'm thinking of cutting down some trees. Now we await the snow!!
I live in a small house across the street from huge maple trees lining the boundary of a cemetary. Raking would be a tiny chore for me, but I don't bother. I just run my mulching mower over the leaves and that's that. I don't like mowing any more than you do (it appears), but it beats raking.

What's the reason to rake rather than just doing that?

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I live in a small house across the street from huge maple trees lining the boundary of a cemetary. Raking would be a tiny chore for me, but I don't bother. I just run my mulching mower over the leaves and that's that. I don't like mowing any more than you do (it appears), but it beats raking.

What's the reason to rake rather than just doing that?

Well, the leaves would kill the grass. I think that if one mulches the leaves, it changes the pH of the soil (but I'm not positive about that). To much mulch prevents air and moisture from getting into the soil to feed the grass. If you need to reseed areas of the lawn, too much mulch prevents the seeds from getting into the soil. I mulch the grass when mowing, but I don't mulch the leaves; there's just too much.

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Well, the leaves would kill the grass. I think that if one mulches the leaves, it changes the pH of the soil (but I'm not positive about that). To much mulch prevents air and moisture from getting into the soil to feed the grass. If you need to reseed areas of the lawn, too much mulch prevents the seeds from getting into the soil. I mulch the grass when mowing, but I don't mulch the leaves; there's just too much.
Ah, optional values. :D I just don't give my yard that much attention. It's green, nothing obviously wrong with it, and that's the end of it for me.

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QUOTE(Stephen Speicher @ Dec 3 2006, 09:23 PM)

What's a rake?

Futhermore, what's snow? :D

Both terms relate to something called "Seasons". For more, see OUD...;-)

I'm responsible for a property that collects an incredible amount of leaves. A leaf vacuum, when combined with a leaf blower, seems to make life a lot easier. For more, see something called "Home Depot"...;-)

JohnRGT

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Futhermore, what's snow? :D

Imagine 120 degrees in the shade in the summer (shouldn't be hard for you) with no humidity. Now, take away the heat and add moisture. Voila, snow.

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What's a rake?
Futhermore, what's snow? :D

Both terms relate to something called "Seasons".

I'm very familiar with the 3 three seasons, John. Summer, Fall, and Spring. :D

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Well, the leaves would kill the grass. I think that if one mulches the leaves, it changes the pH of the soil (but I'm not positive about that). To much mulch prevents air and moisture from getting into the soil to feed the grass. If you need to reseed areas of the lawn, too much mulch prevents the seeds from getting into the soil. I mulch the grass when mowing, but I don't mulch the leaves; there's just too much.

The leaves will kill the grass most likely. Do you have oak trees? Sounds like you have plenty of them! I know southern type pine trees will also raise the level of pH in soil making it hard to grow anything around them.

One thing that might make the chore easier is a leaf blower which also can work as a vacuum. It wouldn't work well if the leaves are wet though.

We have two (scrub?) oak trees. One in back and one in front and if I don't rake or vacuum the fallen leaves they'll kill St. Augustine lawn. I'm not so fond of the oak trees down here, so at some point I will look for a small to medium size evergreen type tree to replace them.

A couple of weeks ago I planted the winter annuals in both the front and back. Deep purple petunias and blue pansies. They're all starting to bloom now and look great with my blue and white Christmas lights! :D

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You should use it to your advantage! If you use a mower or a mulcher and mulch all of the leaves, then keep them in the trash bags, having been mixed with dirt, twigs, and grass, you can use the mulch in the spring in your garden. It's perfect! No need to go out and spend money when you can live off the land :D.

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Both terms relate to something called "Seasons".

I'm very familiar with the 3 three seasons, John. Summer, Fall, and Spring. :D

Coastal Queeensland has a hot summer and a cool summer. That's it. Beautiful one day, perfect the next. :D

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What's a rake? :D

Rake

:D

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One thing I've found about leaf raking is that it makes a lot of difference what kind of leaves they are.

Small ones take a lot of work. The first pass "misses" some of them, as they go between the tines of the rake. So one has to keep raking, and somehow, there are always some left. So sometimes, I don't bother with small leaves.

But really big leaves are very easy to rake. There's a species of maple tree here called, appropirately, "bigleaf maple." (The largest leaf I've measured was 17 inches across.) Even when these leaves are soaking wet, a rake doesn't miss any of them, and they're easy to pick up: no need to rake them into a box; just grab an armful of them from a pile. (It would make it more dificult, though, if I ran the lawn mower over them first. That would convert nice easy big leaves into vexing small ones. :D )

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I don't give the yard any attention ever. It is green enough most of the time. The only important grass where I live is in the horse pastures, and they take care of the leaves by trampling them or letting them blow away. :D

Mowing the grass is a fun chore. I live on a lot of land so there is a fair few of tools to mow lots of grass. Driving the tractor with a huge mower attached is a fast way to clear at least a few acres per hour. The best fun possible mowing is sitting in the cab of a tractor and going right over the top of a big nest of angry yellow jackets (they nest in the ground here). I just get to sit and listen to the big swarm of hornets run into the glass and die, laughing safely out of their reach.

Another fun thing is to use a zero-turn mower. It's like a rolling office chair, but with a big powerful motor and a blade at the bottom.... :D

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Coastal Queeensland has a hot summer and a cool summer. That's it. Beautiful one day, perfect the next. :)

I can now personally attest to the Queensland weather. I spent approximately 2 weeks driving from Sydney (which is NOT in Queensland, lest you Aussies out there think I'm an idiot :)) to Cairns. The weather (and scenery) was lovely the whole way.

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We have two (scrub?) oak trees. One in back and one in front and if I don't rake or vacuum the fallen leaves they'll kill St. Augustine lawn. I'm not so fond of the oak trees down here, so at some point I will look for a small to medium size evergreen type tree to replace them.

I was skeptical of this whole leaf-killing-the-grass claim from the start, and now I'm double skeptical.

We have St.Augustine grass in our Texas home, and plenty of Oak trees, and we NEVER bag leaves. I've never seen a case where the leaves kill the grass. In fact, the grass is often the greenest under an Oak tree where I live.

I looked up Oak on Wikipedia and found that it is an extremely broad term though, applying to several hundreds of species. We may just have completely different types of "Oak", with mine being better though :)

The Oak you describe sounds like some kind of shubby pine-like animal, whereas our Oaks are large and majestic, with huge trunks sometimes over ten feet in circumference.

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Well, my wife and I just got done today with raking for this year. It's the thing I hate most about owning a home. Raking and mowing rank 1 and 2 in hateable chores. I used to pay my son, but he's off to college this year. I tried using my friends son, but he didn't want to do it this weekend. So we ended up doing it. It took about 8 39-gallon trash bags today. I'm thinking of cutting down some trees. Now we await the snow!!

This sounds like a job for the Wonder Rake 5000:

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-7...9&q=rake+mad+tv

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I was skeptical of this whole leaf-killing-the-grass claim from the start, and now I'm double skeptical.

We have St.Augustine grass in our Texas home, and plenty of Oak trees, and we NEVER bag leaves. I've never seen a case where the leaves kill the grass. In fact, the grass is often the greenest under an Oak tree where I live.

I looked up Oak on Wikipedia and found that it is an extremely broad term though, applying to several hundreds of species. We may just have completely different types of "Oak", with mine being better though :)

The Oak you describe sounds like some kind of shubby pine-like animal, whereas our Oaks are large and majestic, with huge trunks sometimes over ten feet in circumference.

Yes, there are a number of oak tree types. The oak trees on our property have small leaves, and as I said, I think they are called scrub oak, but will have to ask my lawn guy next time he comes around. At the moment I can't find a photo of the oak tree itself, but will look more or take a new one to post. I wonder if you have the oak with the broad leaf - the kind that change beautiful colors in the fall.

But yes - we keep it raked when it drops leaves.

By the way, being from Colorado I was used to Kentucky Blue grass. I know St. Augustine grass is supposed to be a "better" lawn grass down here, but it is so thick that it reminds me of crabgrass. I ALWAYS wear shoes outside because I'm never sure what kind of little animal or creepy crawly is under foot. :) Another thing that might make a thread at some point is how to kill crabgrass. I heard that it is possible to dust baking soda over a lightly moistened (dew?) area with crabgrass and that would do the trick.

Another topic I'd love to learn more about as well is ... how to kill these bloody aphids! :)

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