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Is This Art?

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Here's a link to how I've approached this new-to-me way of working.

Wow! You're off to a great start.

I do have the hair, face, cloak and background saved as a large file on seperate layers in Photoshop so I can proceed as I learn more. This is a work in progress.

Keep at it and I expect you will make tremendous progress.

Learning and mastering a new medium is extremely difficult and challenging, but the payoff -- as with most difficult things -- is enormous.

Indeed. And thank you.

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I underwent an operation on Nov. 5. A Laminectomy. I had no idea it would be this way. I'm practically crippled for nearly a year. I can neither bend nor twist nor reach. This is now done for me by my wife. I use a cane while shuffling across our rooms. There is pain, but that will diminish over the months. I can't sit for more than an hour. This last is the worst because my Art work is done by bending over my drawing table. I would spend up to 18 hours a day working on drawings and paintings. I don't use an easel. So now I'm desperately trying to learn to make digital art on the computer.

Here's my first attempt at digital "art". Needs some work on the hair, face and cloak. As Stephen Speicher pointed out it's not art but it is artistic. My intent is to create an image that approaches traditional art in style.

Here's a link to how I've approached this new-to-me way of working.

I do have the hair, face, cloak and background saved as a large file on seperate layers in Photoshop so I can proceed as I learn more. This is a work in progress. Something I would never show before in my traditional work. I show it here for a couple of reasons:

1. It really is artistic and the artist wants to show off his work.

2. Looking for encouragement to go on.

This last I never permitted myself to want or ask for. But working digitally I sure would like to have it as I've found this to be more difficult than my traditional art.

You may be new to digital art but that is clearly the work of a very accomplished artist. Aside from a very nice picture your skill is quite obvious in that you have avoided a couple of the most common mistakes...

The first one is that the smudge tool is not a blender. This is a mistake i'm very familiar with myself. I have just recently started practicing on 2D work(I have only worked on 3D before, with focus on rendering and digital sculpting, so my 2D skills are still outright awfull), and I can't even tell you how many times i've seen that subject brought up. Apparently it's one of the most common mistakes, and while I suppose the intention is to make more smooth transitions the result is usually dirty and blurred looking images(though it can be somewhat avoided by using the scatter setting where you increase the count and count jitter).

From what i've gathered the most commonly preffered technique is to use a very low opacity brush(and usually just the standard round brush with hard edges, though I suppose it depends on what kind of texture you want on the image). Some people who have gone from traditional media to digital art have also told me that to really make use of the digital media they had to decrease both flow and opacity. However the intention then was to have very smooth transitions which often gives a more "digital" look.

Another thing is that from what I can see you have worked with color temperatures instead of just adding different values. Even many professionals seem to work with mostly ligheter/darker colors, maybe because it's a little quicker and easier to just mask off an area and change the value. Your colors look like they also change in hue and saturation.

Lastly, I don't know what your workflow looks like but one thing i've gotten beaten into my head is to always work non-destructively. That is, keeping as much as possible in separate layers. You are probably doing so already, but if not then it really helps to have control over all the different parts of the image. Then over the base layers, have those layers set to multiply(i'm not sure exactly what it does, but it seems to blend better with underlying layers).

Anyway, please take this for what it is. I'm merely trying to point out a few things that came to my mind, but it is from my very limited knowledge. I'm not an accomplished artist, yet.

Oh, and btw, one thing that just occured to me... have you tried using Corel Painter? While you have clearly made Photoshop work for you I think you might enjoy Painter more. In Painter you have great selection of brushes, which you can also modify, and not in like Photoshop where you can only have different shapes and textures - you have oils, watercolor, markers, acrylics, pens and much more. You also have textures for different papers, and perhaps the nicest function of them all is that you can rotate the canvas as you work. It's really a fantastic application and great fun to work with. While Photoshop is more geared towards photo manipulation and that kind of stuff, Painter is more for the artist. You can get the free trial version here and see if you like it.

Yes, my aim is to replicate traditional art. I love much of the digital art I've seen, but it's so much sameness.

I could not agree more with that!

I think one reason for that is because most people learn from the same sources. They find tutorials on the internet or get the latest DVD from Gnomon Workshop(btw, they have some really amazing educational material, maybe some of it could interest you - check it out at http://www.thegnomonworkshop.com/), then when they have learned the skills they do much the same thing as the artist they learned from. Then of course using the same techniques and workflows also generates a similarity in looks.

In the industry there's also alot of preconcieved notions on how things should look. However that's something i've noticed the most in 3D where alot of work is only judged by the level of photorealism(which can be a valid standard within the right contexts). In 2D the biggest similarities seems to be found in concept art. Often there's just a certain look to it. One reason is perhaps that people are used to it looking a certain way, but then there's also a problem in that it's not just the artist who decides what it should look like. The artists get their orders from producers and directors, and I suppose that's not always working so well.

One thing I do love about this field though is the almost complete lack of modern art junk. In the digital art communities you will instead find people who are very, very skilled and serious about their work. There's no slinging mud on a canvas or pretending that an artwork can consist of one solid color, instead people are devoted to serious study of the art forms and that is just such a pleasure to see.

I was recently looking into the options of studying more traditonal art after I finish my digital graphics degree, just so that I can develop some really solid skills(and perhaps even move from digital to traditional art). I must say I was quite shocked at what I found at the colleges and universities around here. While they offered courses in painting and sculpting the student "art"work they displayed was among the worst things i've ever seen, most of it could not even be considered art. I mentioned it to a friend who studied art at a community college and he pretty much told me to forget about it; if the assignments would not drive me mad the classes consisting of 90% radical feminists sure would.

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Jumping to a different subject, may I ask what kind of Wacom tablet you are using? I think your line drawing looks very clean, which is something i'm having real trouble with my Bamboo tablet(not sure if it's me or the tablet though, but I find it much, much more difficult with the tablet than with pen and paper). My lines usually look like i'm about to have a caffeine overdose... :angry2:

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From what i've gathered the most commonly preffered technique is to use a very low opacity brush(and usually just the standard round brush with hard edges, though I suppose it depends on what kind of texture you want on the image). Some people who have gone from traditional media to digital art have also told me that to really make use of the digital media they had to decrease both flow and opacity.

Yes, this is what I've found to be most effective.

Oh, and btw, one thing that just occured to me... have you tried using Corel Painter? While you have clearly made Photoshop work for you I think you might enjoy Painter more. In Painter you have great selection of brushes, which you can also modify, and not in like Photoshop where you can only have different shapes and textures - you have oils, watercolor, markers, acrylics, pens and much more. You also have textures for different papers, and perhaps the nicest function of them all is that you can rotate the canvas as you work. It's really a fantastic application and great fun to work with. While Photoshop is more geared towards photo manipulation and that kind of stuff, Painter is more for the artist. You can get the free trial version here and see if you like it.

I do have Painter IX, but talk about a learning curve! The oils, watercolor, acrylics etc. don't behave at all like the traditional media of the same names.

One thing I do love about this field though is the almost complete lack of modern art junk. In the digital art communities you will instead find people who are very, very skilled and serious about their work. There's no slinging mud on a canvas or pretending that an artwork can consist of one solid color, instead people are devoted to serious study of the art forms and that is just such a pleasure to see.

There is seemingly unlimited imagination in what I've seen in digital art. My favorite find so far is Sasha Beliaev just because he comes closest to what looks like traditional art.

I must say I was quite shocked at what I found at the colleges and universities around here. While they offered courses in painting and sculpting the student "art"work they displayed was among the worst things i've ever seen

So things haven't changed since I was there in the 1970's. Wanting to study anatomy, my professor said "anatomy is out of fashion". So I went to the PhysEd dept. for a course in Kinesiology. A little value there. But the best way, if one is self-teaching, is to buy a human skeleton and a flayed figure for the superficial muscles (these are available at art supply stores) and plenty of books on Artistic Anatomy.

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Jumping to a different subject, may I ask what kind of Wacom tablet you are using? I think your line drawing looks very clean, which is something i'm having real trouble with my Bamboo tablet(not sure if it's me or the tablet though, but I find it much, much more difficult with the tablet than with pen and paper). My lines usually look like i'm about to have a caffeine overdose...

Mine is a WACOM Intuos 3, a 6.5 x 11" tablet. I suggest that your "caffeine overdose" lines are the way to go. You then find among the hundreds of lines the ones that matter and either erase the others or preferably ignore them as they'll be covered by subsequent layers.

Thank you for your informative post. Love to see your work. Perhaps links in a PM?

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I underwent an operation on Nov. 5. A Laminectomy. I had no idea it would be this way. I'm practically crippled for nearly a year. I can neither bend nor twist nor reach. This is now done for me by my wife. I use a cane while shuffling across our rooms. There is pain, but that will diminish over the months. I can't sit for more than an hour. This last is the worst because my Art work is done by bending over my drawing table. I would spend up to 18 hours a day working on drawings and paintings. I don't use an easel. So now I'm desperately trying to learn to make digital art on the computer.

Here's my first attempt at digital "art". Needs some work on the hair, face and cloak. As Stephen Speicher pointed out it's not art but it is artistic. My intent is to create an image that approaches traditional art in style.

Here's a link to how I've approached this new-to-me way of working.

I do have the hair, face, cloak and background saved as a large file on seperate layers in Photoshop so I can proceed as I learn more. This is a work in progress. Something I would never show before in my traditional work. I show it here for a couple of reasons:

1. It really is artistic and the artist wants to show off his work.

2. Looking for encouragement to go on.

This last I never permitted myself to want or ask for. But working digitally I sure would like to have it as I've found this to be more difficult than my traditional art.

Robert, by all means go on. What you have done so far has much exciting life in it and is very selfishly worth seeing.

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I do have Painter IX, but talk about a learning curve! The oils, watercolor, acrylics etc. don't behave at all like the traditional media of the same names.

I agree, and i'm also using Photoshop for that reason(plus that it's industry standard so I will likely do a lot of work in PS in the future). Once past the learning curve though there's an amazing set of tools.

There is seemingly unlimited imagination in what I've seen in digital art. My favorite find so far is Sasha Beliaev just because he comes closest to what looks like traditional art.

Wow, he's got some really amazing work!

I agree about the seemingly unlimited imagintion in digital art. That's something I find really fascinating and makes the art very enjoyable even though I often disagree with many artists philosophical value judgements. Regarding imagination, one artist that I found recently and who I can really recommend is Ian McCaig, who an be found here:

http://www.thegnomonworkshop.com/gallery/mccaig.html

Now I don't like him so much for the pieces displayed there, though I like some of them, but what I really enjoyed was watching his DVD's on visual storytelling.

Ian starts off by simply laying out the basic anatomy of a story. He then demonstrates this by making a spin-off on H.C Andersens 'The Little Mermaid', where he changes the setting to outer space and draws "space mermaids". I know this probably doesnt sound like a fantastic story, but the point is not really the story itself which is more to just demonstrate his way of thinking. What he does is to make a series of drawings, while he makes up the story as he goes, and as he goes he shows how he makes the visual elements fit into this story. It's like a story being told by his drawings and he designs the characters, different environments/stages and costumes. I found it really delightful and fascinating to watch because of how you get to see his imagination at work.

So things haven't changed since I was there in the 1970's. Wanting to study anatomy, my professor said "anatomy is out of fashion". So I went to the PhysEd dept. for a course in Kinesiology. A little value there. But the best way, if one is self-teaching, is to buy a human skeleton and a flayed figure for the superficial muscles (these are available at art supply stores) and plenty of books on Artistic Anatomy.

No wonder things are so bad if anatomy was out of fashion already back in the 70's. It's really sad. I like to think of the human form as the highest and noblest form of art and it should be devoted to serious study. But I guess with the influences of modern art the "artists" are more interested in twisting it to grotesque and surrealistic forms.

I was actually looking for anatmy books and figures the other day and visited one of the biggest art supply stores in the city. They did not have any of it, not even a single book on anatomy(fortunately though books are not too hard to get through the internet, but a figure and a skeleton seem much more rare). I did however get a tip about some computer application where you can get a 3D view of a human with different "layers", never got the name though...

Most of what i've learned about anatomy I have gathered from my interest in exercise. I'm not sure how well it applies to artistic purposes but i've found it really helps to atleast have some basic understanding of anatomy, the biggest difficulty seems to be translating it to form and motion(for example it's one thing to know where the muscles are located and another thing to understand the shapes and what happens in different poses).

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Mine is a WACOM Intuos 3, a 6.5 x 11" tablet. I suggest that your "caffeine overdose" lines are the way to go. You then find among the hundreds of lines the ones that matter and either erase the others or preferably ignore them as they'll be covered by subsequent layers.

Thank you for your informative post. Love to see your work. Perhaps links in a PM?

Thanks! I'll go with my caffeinated lines then. :)

I don't mind posting a few pieces here in this thread, though I don't have that much to show. I would also like to give a little background so you can put it into context(while I hope this post will not be too long).

I have only been doing this seriously for a rather short time. While I enjoyed drawing and painting when I was younger I never really managed to get my head around it. Some people seem to pick up on it from a very early age but I have come to it much later. I learned some 3D graphics many years ago but at that time the learning material available was rarely any good. I think it was about three years ago that I picked it up again when a friend of mine insisted that I try this great software called ZBrush(which basically is a very intuitive digital sculpting application). Earlier I had convinced him to pursue a career in digital graphics, which he turned out to be very sucessfull at, and I guess he wanted to return that favor.

Anyway, I immediatley fell in love with the software and even though my first attempts would have been bad for a five year old I could already see the potential. And finding good learning material nowadays is real easy, and you know... once that process of creating something is broken down so you understand it, be it a sculpture, painting or a 3D-model, I suppose it's just a matter of practicing until you get good at it.

At this time I had a full time job and on my free time I had a project of building a race car and starting a company for tuning cars. However I found myself spending an increasing amount of time learning 3D and digital sculpting. It became quite obvious what it was that I really wanted...

Here are a couple of unfinished sculpts that I made just before I decided to apply for my current education. They are unfinished because I had to drop them and start working on the application, and because I lost the files I was working with.

http://i36.tinypic.com/2jcwspj.jpg

http://i35.tinypic.com/2dre6b7.jpg

I must add that there are so many things wrong with those that really annoy me, and that would take 10 minutes to fix if I had not lost the work(and unfortunately i'm too busy with other things now that I have no time to make anything new, but oh well...). I guess the most obvious must be the "slightly" overexaggerated necks...

For my application my goal was to get in despite the fact that I wasnt actually qualified and there would be quite many competing for just a few places(though I only focused on creating something that I liked). This is still the best work i've ever done, and while there are things i'd like to correct and that I can do better now, i'm proud of it(though I prefer the prints which I think look better).

http://i37.tinypic.com/1qgwue.jpg

A big reason why i'm proud of that is because of how much I had to learn when I made it. The assignment for the application was to make a coffee cup, and that's about how much I knew how to do with the software I was using.

Anyway, after that most of my time has gone to completing the assignments I get from my classes. I rarely have time to work on my own stuff which can get a bit frustrating. Most of the assignments are made just for practicing certain things, and they range from rendering, animation, technical directing and compositing. Not much to show there. Then we have different group projects, which noone likes and that really sets the quality. I guess I can show a few examples on a couple of assignments though. Nothing serious, but...

Here the idea was to render some objects on a table. Just for the fun of it I added an evil teddybear, that's just my quirky humor.

http://i35.tinypic.com/2vtdxg3.jpg

A couple of glass renders

http://i36.tinypic.com/eg8kua.jpg

http://i37.tinypic.com/2jd4ad0.jpg

This one I made for a rendering competition we had(I was too slow so I missed the deadline though). I kind of like it because it shows a little bit on how I like to approach rendering, which is not necessarily the most realistic way(I used over 10 lights here) but rather to "paint with light".

http://i35.tinypic.com/2ngddop.jpg

As far as 2D work goes I have done very little of it yet. We have had a few classes on drawing, just dealing with some of the fundamentals like shading simple objects. When i've had the time i've played a little bit with Photoshop and Painter. In Photoshop I have mostly done some textures and photo manipulations. This is my latest and most serious attempt at painting something. I found a photo of Marilyn Monroe, made a simple line drawing from that and then used it as reference. It's unfinished and i've used a bad technique with too much smudging. I tried two different aproaches for the hair but none of them worked very good. The idea here was just to practice value painting and I think that later I will make a colored version and try to get a nicer look.

http://i35.tinypic.com/6572qa.jpg

http://i34.tinypic.com/34xnx3k.jpg

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Goodness, this feels like a very long post. I hope that you found atleast something to enjoy. As you can see i'm very much a beginner here. A year ago I set a goal for myself to be able to work with this professionally within 5 years, and I guess that shows a little bit where I think i'm at(though I think I can do that sooner). :angry2:

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There is seemingly unlimited imagination in what I've seen in digital art. My favorite find so far is Sasha Beliaev just because he comes closest to what looks like traditional art.

Wow, he's got some really amazing work!

As close as I've found that looks like an oil painting. And all done in Photoshop.

Regarding imagination, one artist that I found recently and who I can really recommend is Ian McCaig, who an be found here:

http://www.thegnomonworkshop.com/gallery/mccaig.html

Thank you. I like his "pencil" look on the lower left.

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I like these, especially your first.

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Goodness, this feels like a very long post. I hope that you found atleast something to enjoy. As you can see i'm very much a beginner here. A year ago I set a goal for myself to be able to work with this professionally within 5 years, and I guess that shows a little bit where I think i'm at(though I think I can do that sooner). :angry2:

Interesting. I don't know how old you are (I might have looked for it on your profile before this post....) but I had similar goals when I was 25. I had projected success in 10 years. That came and went, so I looked forward to age 45. And so on. Still not there at age 60. A while ago I did an average of what I've earned over 32 years and came up with $00.16 an hour. I was in L.A. three times in the late 1980's with my work. It was shown at friends' apartments and I came away with $5100.00 in sales. While there I took some of my work to a gallery hoping for a place for my work. The owner didn't take anything but told me I'd be recognized as a 20th century "minor master". I suspect you'll achieve your goals as you say "sooner". Also while in L.A. I was staying at Simon Federman's place and just down the street was a place I went to. They were ready to hire me on the spot to do "Fan Art". I've done a few, but couldn't see myself doing anything else but what "came from within". Here is a work of mine (hope you can see it--if not it's a free registration and you can look and post your own works) in that genre and in a technique I rarely have done--colored pencil. It's not Maryland Monroe. It's a drawing of her before she became Maryland.

Take care. Work hard. Best wishes and hope to hear from you and see more of your work soon.

Robert Tracy

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I like these, especially your first.

Thanks!

The first one was technically quite fun to make because it only uses the most basic materials. In 3D there are often a lot of different more or less advanced materials that are typically used to mimick more correct physics, in order to get more realistic attributes. This one though uses only default materials, which worked quite nicely(except for a little too much yellow tint). It was a bit of a fun challenge.

Interesting. I don't know how old you are (I might have looked for it on your profile before this post....) but I had similar goals when I was 25. I had projected success in 10 years. That came and went, so I looked forward to age 45. And so on. Still not there at age 60. A while ago I did an average of what I've earned over 32 years and came up with $00.16 an hour. I was in L.A. three times in the late 1980's with my work. It was shown at friends' apartments and I came away with $5100.00 in sales. While there I took some of my work to a gallery hoping for a place for my work. The owner didn't take anything but told me I'd be recognized as a 20th century "minor master". I suspect you'll achieve your goals as you say "sooner". Also while in L.A. I was staying at Simon Federman's place and just down the street was a place I went to. They were ready to hire me on the spot to do "Fan Art". I've done a few, but couldn't see myself doing anything else but what "came from within". Here is a work of mine (hope you can see it--if not it's a free registration and you can look and post your own works) in that genre and in a technique I rarely have done--colored pencil. It's not Maryland Monroe. It's a drawing of her before she became Maryland.

Take care. Work hard. Best wishes and hope to hear from you and see more of your work soon.

Robert Tracy

I'm 26, so I set a goal to be able to work with this before I turn 30. But that's just to have a more or less short term goal to work towards. I guess though it's like one of my teachers said the first day at school; "if you're here to make money you're in the wrong place". While there certainly are money to be made in computer graphics it's a really tough buisness to get into, so it's not going to be easy.

You know, i've thought alot about doing just what "comes from within". I think this is a necessary part. For the last 6 months I have only done a few small things that are really "my own". That is, when i've been free to do what I desire the most. This has made me realise that there is no way in the long run that I could do anything else. I just have to find a way to make that possible.

I really like your Norma-Jean, especially the light. :)

Thanks Mr. Tracy. I'll keep posting as I progress. I'd love to see how your digital work is going too.

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I'm 26, so I set a goal to be able to work with this before I turn 30. But that's just to have a more or less short term goal to work towards. I guess though it's like one of my teachers said the first day at school; "if you're here to make money you're in the wrong place". While there certainly are money to be made in computer graphics it's a really tough buisness to get into, so it's not going to be easy.

Yes, as you work towards your short term goal, reversing your teacher's statement, I see that it's possible to make money on it. I'd say, keep at it.

You know, i've thought alot about doing just what "comes from within". I think this is a necessary part. For the last 6 months I have only done a few small things that are really "my own". That is, when i've been free to do what I desire the most. This has made me realise that there is no way in the long run that I could do anything else. I just have to find a way to make that possible.

It's not only possible, it's crucial. As you work on your short term you must above all create the "small things" (i.e., the things that matter to you). That is the long term.

I really like your Norma-Jean, especially the light. :)

Thank you very much.

I'll keep posting as I progress. I'd love to see how your digital work is going too.

Please do keep posting your work. I like what I see and am eager to see progress.

Here is what I have:

I started with a thing I'd forgotten about,

artist_daughter_favorite.jpg

a pencil that was among "stuff" I found in my basement. Done on a piece of scrap paper and damaged by a not so dry basement. But I found I loved this "sketch" and went from there on the Wacom tablet.

I've made some progress in Photoshop on the color digital version here:

finished_maybe.jpg

The face needs some work, and I've tried all kinds of blending but kind of like the line work and am trying to somehow keep that.

Please send your "my own" things.

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Yes, as you work towards your short term goal, reversing your teacher's statement, I see that it's possible to make money on it. I'd say, keep at it.

Oh, I will! :)

As I see it, sucess is just a matter of getting good enough at it - which in turn should only be a matter of time, patience and hard work.

It's not only possible, it's crucial. As you work on your short term you must above all create the "small things" (i.e., the things that matter to you). That is the long term.

That's very true.

I know a few people who pursued their careers thinking only about what the industry wanted, without much thought about what mattered to themselves(except finding a job and getting paid). They all have a few things in common; they are bitter, complain about their jobs and have lost all interest in what they are doing. That's something I certainly don't want for myself

Please do keep posting your work. I like what I see and am eager to see progress.

I will, I really enjoy posting my work here and it makes me even more motivated.

Here is what I have:

I started with a thing I'd forgotten about,

artist_daughter_favorite.jpg

a pencil that was among "stuff" I found in my basement. Done on a piece of scrap paper and damaged by a not so dry basement. But I found I loved this "sketch" and went from there on the Wacom tablet.

That's really nice. I don't know how much of it was damaged but I like the look of a fine drawing on a piece of old scrap paper. It's a nice contrast between the paper and the drawing.

I've made some progress in Photoshop on the color digital version here:

finished_maybe.jpg

The face needs some work, and I've tried all kinds of blending but kind of like the line work and am trying to somehow keep that.

I like the warmer light and I think this looks more "romantic" than the earlier version

Please send your "my own" things.

Only thing i've really done since my application is the Marilyn Monroe picture and then this quick little unfinished sketch:

http://i34.tinypic.com/32zuejc.jpg (it's a pole dancer but I havent worked on the pole yet... it's way too sloppy but I wanted to make it relatively fast - I have a tendency to spend too much time just going back and forth when I work, getting stuck and not making any improvements at all, that's why I tried to limit the time a little bit).

Usually I just have too much to do at school, especially when we have bigger projects to work on(that's why I tend to post here so irregularly, because when we have projects there's not much time for anything else than eat, sleep and work). The projects we do are supposed to be more serious work, but so far most of it get spoiled by the fact that we have to work in groups and everyone is sort of pulling in different directions. Currently though i'm working on something that has atleast got some good potential(it's basically up to a couple of us taking charge and trying to steer it in the right direction). Hopefully i'll have something nice to show when it's finished after the hollidays.

During the hollidays I think i'll have a little more time to focus on painting too. I'll post here when I have something. :)

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Apparently this thread is still open.

Great examples! And I agree w/Stephen ... absolultely, if it was done from scratch, it is art. "Happiness is a Bluebird" is wonderful, and a great teaching tool. I've got PhotoShop but am poorly versed in it. I still draw the old fashioned way. -_-

"Spoiled" has a very odd explanation. While the rendering is beautiful, the artist failed to communicate the intent. If I hadn't read the explanation, I would NEVER have known that was an anti-human(ity) piece.

Mac or Red, which one of you did the sketch that was uploaded? Thanks for sharing!

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First ever post...

From reading the thread i thought it was odd how using photoshop, so many people want to make it look like a traditional oil painting.

Personally the beauty of an oil painting lies in its total originality as an artefact. I think the digital nature of things like photoshop should totally be embraced. Nothing should try to replace, but become a thing itself. Photography did not put an end to paint. rather painting adapted itself from representational to non representational and took pride in being able to do what photography couldn't.

Surely if the artist calls his/her work 'art' it HAS to be art? Criticisms cannot strip a work of art of its creators intention?

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I found these examples in the GALLERY at The Computer Graphics Society. I've seen better surfing the web and chose these almost at random just to illustrate my question. My standard of choice was that the works had to be representaional. Unfortunately these "artists" offer no information on how they made these works. However, I do know that this kind of work can be done just like a traditional artist works. He starts with a blank page. Then he can use a tablet and pen to draw and select colors into his graphics program.

th_the_good_arrowhead.jpg

Title: The Good Arrowhead

Name: Alexander Beliaev

Country: Canada

Software: Photoshop

Large image HERE.

Way cool!

ruveyn

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