Joss Delage

New car!!!

36 posts in this topic

I'm pretty excited - I just bought a new car. My current car is a '99 Toyota RAV4. At the time, I couldn't afford anything fancy and I got the basic model, 2WD, 4 cylinders. It's a great car, very user friendly, with great mpg, but I wanted something with (1) better safety, (2) slightly more cargo space, (3) more power, and ideally a few luxury features (heated leather seats, sunroof...)

After looking at several other models (Nissan Murano, Honda CR-V and Pilot, Toyota Highlander), I decided to buy the new RAV4, but to get the top of the line. It has superb safety features (electronic stability control, front, side, and curtain airbags, ABS, etc). It's also 4WD. It's 2 generations up from my car and is a bit bigger & longer, with more cargo space.

This baby has a V6 that develops 269HP! It's not a 'Vette, but in it's class it's a rocket! And it still gets 22mpg according to Consumer Report.

Yoohoo! I can't wait to get it (it should be in sometimes this week, but I'll be in Vegas all week for business).

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Yoohoo! I can't wait to get it ...

Congratulations, Joss. It's always exciting getting a new car. :)

But, you you didn't tell us what color you chose. (The exterior colors for the RAV4 are viewable here. Just click on "Colors.") So, which color is it?

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Good for you, Joss.

I've always worked on my cars. Nobody comes close to the build quality of Toyota.

(They're expected to surpass GMC as the largest manufacturere of automobiles in 2007.)

JohnRGT

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The car is light metallic blue (they call it Pacific Blue, . It is not my favorite color, but it also wasn't a critical thing. I wanted to be able to negotiate on the price / shop around, so I had to have some flexibility.

The car is this color:

photo_11.jpg

And this is the trim, Limited V6:

photo_15.jpg

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I've always worked on my cars. Nobody comes close to the build quality of Toyota.

(They're expected to surpass GMC as the largest manufacturere of automobiles in 2007.)

JohnRGT

My brother recently got his wife a Toyota SUV for Christmas, and he has piled heaps of praise on this vehicle (and he builds muscle-cars too, so his opinion carries a lot).

Toyota's vehicles have great power, luxury, reliability and superb gas-mileage, so it's no wonder to me that they are going to surpass GMC. The Big-3 in America need to pick up the pace, or soon their long-held throne over SUV's and Trucks in America is going to be chiseled away by superior Japanese products.

Enjoy the new vehicle Joss :)

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I have fond memories of driving a Rav-4 around the south island of New Zealand some years ago. The car rental place didn't have the car that I'd originally reserved and offered the Rav-4 instead. Simultaneously handling both driving on the wrong (British) side of the road and the manual transmission (being used to an automatic) was a bit of a challenge but I loved the trip.

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I've always worked on my cars. Nobody comes close to the build quality of Toyota.

I agree. And if you can afford it, a Lexus (a division of Toyota) is even higher quality.

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I agree. And if you can afford it, a Lexus (a division of Toyota) is even higher quality.

A used Lexus can be quite affordable -- an excellent buy given how good a car it can be. My wife bought a used 1992 Lexus SC300 several years ago. It's up to 180,000 miles and still going strong, and it cost less than $10,000.

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I'm pretty excited - I just bought a new car. My current car is a '99 Toyota RAV4. At the time, I couldn't afford anything fancy and I got the basic model, 2WD, 4 cylinders. It's a great car, very user friendly, with great mpg, but I wanted something with (1) better safety, (2) slightly more cargo space, (3) more power, and ideally a few luxury features (heated leather seats, sunroof...)

Yikes if you think a '96 is old, it must be time I updated my little baby from 1954. Doubt many of you will know what it is, but it was the first Ford with overhead valves and it pioneered McPhersen struts. This car was way ahead in 1950. But that was when Ford was a better company. I learned to drive on the 4 cylinder version of this. This 6 cylinder version cruises quite happily at 70 mph and 26 mpg.

http://au.pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/arnold_br...scd.jpg&.src=ph

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This car was way ahead in 1950. But that was when Ford was a better company.

My first car was a 1950 Ford. Cost $100: all black, and the driver's door was so smashed that I had to get in from the passenger side. :)

I do not remember that beautiful two-toned model in your picture. Is that really a 1954 Ford? Gorgeous, anyway.

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My first car was a 1950 Ford. Cost $100: all black, and the driver's door was so smashed that I had to get in from the passenger side. :)

I do not remember that beautiful two-toned model in your picture. Is that really a 1954 Ford? Gorgeous, anyway.

In South Africa of the fifties, I don't think there was a car made that was not imported. From Skodas to BMW Issetas, Messerschmidt, Lloyds, DKW, Lincoln Continental, English, Swedish, the lot. The variety was enormous. Among these were the British Fords. My car. although a '54 actually came out in 1950, and this British Ford Zephyr Six was smaller but more advanced than the USA models of that time, which still had split windshields and side valves. I would have been surprised if you had known what it was, because few were imported to the USA. New Zealand had many.

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Great choice, Toyota is a fine company. Their parts supplier, Denso, is one of the few companies in the industry actually making tons of money. :)

FYI, I think Toyota is a part of the Big 3 now. :)

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I'm pretty excited - I just bought a new car. My current car is a '99 Toyota RAV4. At the time, I couldn't afford anything fancy and I got the basic model, 2WD, 4 cylinders. It's a great car, very user friendly, with great mpg, but I wanted something with (1) better safety, (2) slightly more cargo space, (3) more power, and ideally a few luxury features (heated leather seats, sunroof...)

Yikes if you think a '96 is old, it must be time I updated my little baby from 1954. Doubt many of you will know what it is, but it was the first Ford with overhead valves and it pioneered McPhersen struts. This car was way ahead in 1950. But that was when Ford was a better company. I learned to drive on the 4 cylinder version of this. This 6 cylinder version cruises quite happily at 70 mph and 26 mpg.

http://au.pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/arnold_br...jpg&.src=ph

Just a note that the photos have been moved to:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/aeomaster32/8...57600978691278/

They are no longer on the previous website

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In South Africa of the fifties, I don't think there was a car made that was not imported. From Skodas to BMW Issetas, Messerschmidt, Lloyds, DKW, Lincoln Continental, English, Swedish, the lot. The variety was enormous. Among these were the British Fords. My car. although a '54 actually came out in 1950, and this British Ford Zephyr Six was smaller but more advanced than the USA models of that time, which still had split windshields and side valves.

I think I have learned to post an image rather than the link, so here are the actual Zephyr pictures. To recap, this is a Mk1 Zephyr British Ford, the first Ford with OHV engine, and the first car to be produced with McPherson struts.

885240418_faf41ac0e6_m.jpg885240594_ebda04cd7d_m.jpg

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In South Africa of the fifties, I don't think there was a car made that was not imported. From Skodas to BMW Issetas, Messerschmidt, Lloyds, DKW, Lincoln Continental, English, Swedish, the lot. The variety was enormous. Among these were the British Fords. My car. although a '54 actually came out in 1950, and this British Ford Zephyr Six was smaller but more advanced than the USA models of that time, which still had split windshields and side valves.

I think I have learned to post an image rather than the link, so here are the actual Zephyr pictures. To recap, this is a Mk1 Zephyr British Ford, the first Ford with OHV engine, and the first car to be produced with McPherson struts.

885240418_faf41ac0e6_m.jpg885240594_ebda04cd7d_m.jpg

I used to have a toy of the Ford Zephyr:

47-01.jpg

Were there many MG TCs and TDs in South Africa?

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In South Africa of the fifties, I don't think there was a car made that was not imported. From Skodas to BMW Issetas, Messerschmidt, Lloyds, DKW, Lincoln Continental, English, Swedish, the lot. The variety was enormous. Among these were the British Fords. My car. although a '54 actually came out in 1950, and this British Ford Zephyr Six was smaller but more advanced than the USA models of that time, which still had split windshields and side valves.

I think I have learned to post an image rather than the link, so here are the actual Zephyr pictures. To recap, this is a Mk1 Zephyr British Ford, the first Ford with OHV engine, and the first car to be produced with McPherson struts.

I used to have a toy of the Ford Zephyr:

47-01.jpg

Were there many MG TCs and TDs in South Africa?

Wow, that is an amazing model. I have not been able to find one like that, and it's even the same colour.

Yes, one of my friends had an MG, I think it was the TC but can't be sure. As I said, the variety of cars in South Africa was enormous; there was no local car industry to protect back then. These days they build BMWs and many other makes.

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In South Africa of the fifties, I don't think there was a car made that was not imported. From Skodas to BMW Issetas, Messerschmidt, Lloyds, DKW, Lincoln Continental, English, Swedish, the lot. The variety was enormous. Among these were the British Fords. My car. although a '54 actually came out in 1950, and this British Ford Zephyr Six was smaller but more advanced than the USA models of that time, which still had split windshields and side valves.

I think I have learned to post an image rather than the link, so here are the actual Zephyr pictures. To recap, this is a Mk1 Zephyr British Ford, the first Ford with OHV engine, and the first car to be produced with McPherson struts.

I used to have a toy of the Ford Zephyr:

47-01.jpg

Were there many MG TCs and TDs in South Africa?

Wow, that is an amazing model. I have not been able to find one like that, and it's even the same colour.

Dinky Toys have not been made for decades. They were high quality, well proportioned die cast models mostly with rubber tires, made by Meccano Ltd in England (with some varieties manufactured in France) and were very popular as toys especially before WWII and through the 1950s. They were roughly the same scale as O gauge trains (Lionel).

The Ford Zephyr model was made in England and first released in 1956. It was about 3 1/2" long, was available in two tone blue or green & cream and cost around $1 in the US. The only way to get them now is mostly auctions like e-bay. The Ford Zephyr in excellent condition would probably cost a couple of hundred dollars today. They go for more with the original box than without. Be patient and you will find one searching on the internet.

Yes, one of my friends had an MG, I think it was the TC but can't be sure. As I said, the variety of cars in South Africa was enormous; there was no local car industry to protect back then. These days they build BMWs and many other makes.

If it had the big, narrow 19" wire wheels it was a TC or older. If it had the more typical 15" wheels of "modern" cars, probably discs, it was probably a TD, which came out in late 1950, or by the mid-50's a TF. (The headlights on the TF were half buried into the swept wing fenders, the older ones were mounted separately on brackets.) Those are the visual differences you might have a slim chance of remembering.

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If it had the big, narrow 19" wire wheels it was a TC or older. If it had the more typical 15" wheels of "modern" cars, probably discs, it was probably a TD, which came out in late 1950, or by the mid-50's a TF. (The headlights on the TF were half buried into the swept wing fenders, the older ones were mounted separately on brackets.) Those are the visual differences you might have a slim chance of remembering.

It was the older version with wire wheels and separate headlights. It may even have been the model before the TC, but I have forgotten the sequence of these models. I remember him demonstrating how 'quickly' he could get around the block, and as he rounded the final corner, those poor skinny wheels were oscillating all over the place.

We have come a long way, even since the seventies. Top Gear demonstrated how a modern family Honda Accord sedan outperformed a seventies E Type and Aston Martin, which were the super-cars of their time.

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Top Gear demonstrated how a modern family Honda Accord sedan outperformed a seventies E Type and Aston Martin, which were the super-cars of their time.

Just the improvements in tire grip alone over the last 5-10 years alone has had a massive imapact. (Grip affects everything from handling, to speed, to vehicle dimensions.)

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If it had the big, narrow 19" wire wheels it was a TC or older. If it had the more typical 15" wheels of "modern" cars, probably discs, it was probably a TD, which came out in late 1950, or by the mid-50's a TF. (The headlights on the TF were half buried into the swept wing fenders, the older ones were mounted separately on brackets.) Those are the visual differences you might have a slim chance of remembering.

It was the older version with wire wheels and separate headlights. It may even have been the model before the TC, but I have forgotten the sequence of these models. I remember him demonstrating how 'quickly' he could get around the block, and as he rounded the final corner, those poor skinny wheels were oscillating all over the place.

The front suspension used a leaf spring sideways across the front. It was a very hard ride but all the T-series cars were very fun to drive. There are still a lot of them driven today in the US but aren't seen very often anymore.

The post WWII TC was preceded by the TA and TB from the late 1930s. Production (all in England) was stopped during the war. The TA and TB were slightly narrower than the TC, but the TC was essentially the same and was hard to distinguish from the earlier T-series models.

We have come a long way, even since the seventies. Top Gear demonstrated how a modern family Honda Accord sedan outperformed a seventies E Type and Aston Martin, which were the super-cars of their time.

The XPAG engines still used in the TDs in the early 1950s were still essentially the 1930s design. The shop manual called for changing the oil every 3,000 miles, checking the oil level every 250 miles and greasing the spindles, water pump, etc every 500 miles (no sealed bearings). The engine had a very long stroke and went about 40,000 miles before needing an overhaul. "Modern" cars in the 1950s were considered long-lasting if they reached 100,000 miles. Over 200,000 is very common now if the body or frame doesn't rust out first.

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The XPAG engines still used in the TDs in the early 1950s were still essentially the 1930s design. The shop manual called for changing the oil every 3,000 miles, checking the oil level every 250 miles and greasing the spindles, water pump, etc every 500 miles (no sealed bearings). The engine had a very long stroke and went about 40,000 miles before needing an overhaul. "Modern" cars in the 1950s were considered long-lasting if they reached 100,000 miles. Over 200,000 is very common now if the body or frame doesn't rust out first.

I often think of this, yet wonder if we will see today's cars on the road, (like my Zephyr) half a century from now . In particular I'm thinking of the computer management systems; these may not be able to be replaced. While it is nice to reap the benefits of computer technology, we put ourselves on the end of a technological limb, and should that limb fail, we will be stranded. Computer parts are not always available for older cars because the technology has evolved. It's like looking for the parts for an Apple2.

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The XPAG engines still used in the TDs in the early 1950s were still essentially the 1930s design. The shop manual called for changing the oil every 3,000 miles, checking the oil level every 250 miles and greasing the spindles, water pump, etc every 500 miles (no sealed bearings). The engine had a very long stroke and went about 40,000 miles before needing an overhaul. "Modern" cars in the 1950s were considered long-lasting if they reached 100,000 miles. Over 200,000 is very common now if the body or frame doesn't rust out first.

I often think of this, yet wonder if we will see today's cars on the road, (like my Zephyr) half a century from now . In particular I'm thinking of the computer management systems; these may not be able to be replaced. While it is nice to reap the benefits of computer technology, we put ourselves on the end of a technological limb, and should that limb fail, we will be stranded. Computer parts are not always available for older cars because the technology has evolved. It's like looking for the parts for an Apple2.

Computer management system in an MG? :D:D :D :D :D :lol: Such a term could only be used to refer to the owner/driver himself, but no one had thought to call it that because electronic computers hadn't been thought of yet, let alone built in a size that was any smaller than a room by the 1940s. This is a car for which you have to adjust and balance the SU carburetors manually (which is an art) and add oil to the dashpots every couple of weeks to damp the motion of the float valves. The ignition system uses a coil, a voltage regulator and a mechanical distributor -- you can take the rotor contact out of the distributor in a few seconds for security when parking. You can start the engine without the key or being in the car at all by moving one of the two fuses to between the contacts to shorting the ignition key and pushing on a rod that is connected to the starter cable to the dashboard starter knob. There is a crank kept behind the seat for use in adjusting the valves which can also be used to start the engine if the starter motor stops working (like a model T Ford). "Diagnostics" consists of listening to the engine with an experienced ear. Turbocharging as an option consisted of a mechanical blower as a compressor turned by a rotating belt. Fortunately, there are small companies still making the very simple parts today for repairs. I think your Ford Zephyr was a little more advanced! But there weren't as many of them so it may be impossible to get parts for them today at all.

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The XPAG engines still used in the TDs in the early 1950s were still essentially the 1930s design. The shop manual called for changing the oil every 3,000 miles, checking the oil level every 250 miles and greasing the spindles, water pump, etc every 500 miles (no sealed bearings). The engine had a very long stroke and went about 40,000 miles before needing an overhaul. "Modern" cars in the 1950s were considered long-lasting if they reached 100,000 miles. Over 200,000 is very common now if the body or frame doesn't rust out first.

I often think of this, yet wonder if we will see today's cars on the road, (like my Zephyr) half a century from now . In particular I'm thinking of the computer management systems; these may not be able to be replaced. While it is nice to reap the benefits of computer technology, we put ourselves on the end of a technological limb, and should that limb fail, we will be stranded. Computer parts are not always available for older cars because the technology has evolved. It's like looking for the parts for an Apple2.

Computer management system in an MG? :lol::lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: Such a term could only be used to refer to the owner/driver himself, but no one had thought to call it that because electronic computers hadn't been thought of yet, let alone built in a size that was any smaller than a room by the 1940s. This is a car for which you have to adjust and balance the SU carburetors manually (which is an art) and add oil to the dashpots every couple of weeks to damp the motion of the float valves. The ignition system uses a coil, a voltage regulator and a mechanical distributor -- you can take the rotor contact out of the distributor in a few seconds for security when parking. You can start the engine without the key or being in the car at all by moving one of the two fuses to between the contacts to shorting the ignition key and pushing on a rod that is connected to the starter cable to the dashboard starter knob. There is a crank kept behind the seat for use in adjusting the valves which can also be used to start the engine if the starter motor stops working (like a model T Ford). "Diagnostics" consists of listening to the engine with an experienced ear. Turbocharging as an option consisted of a mechanical blower as a compressor turned by a rotating belt. Fortunately, there are small companies still making the very simple parts today for repairs. I think your Ford Zephyr was a little more advanced! But there weren't as many of them so it may be impossible to get parts for them today at all.

Oh, I wasn't referring to the old cars when I spoke of computer management, but what would happen to today's cars in the years to come. I would bet my Zephyr will be running in another 50 years, but will a new car today be along side it?

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Oh, I wasn't referring to the old cars when I spoke of computer management, but what would happen to today's cars in the years to come. I would bet my Zephyr will be running in another 50 years, but will a new car today be along side it?

If things go as planned, my Mercedes-Benz will still be running. And because of the quality of the AMG engine I hope to still have many miles of fun and enjoyment.

My wife and I owned a Chevy Tahoe and after just 4 years and just over 40,000 miles (it was a 2003) it had already started to have rattles all over the vehicle. With that said, I had only spent money on general up-keep and nothing was spent for major repairs as nothing had broken as of the time we traded it for her new vehicle.

Ewv's post brought back memories of a class that I had taken in high school, "Know Your Car." Everyday for a whole year my classmates and I learned about the history of cars and how they worked. As we learned the different parts and their uses we would take them apart and learn, indepth, how they worked with other parts of the car. One of our many class projects was to take apart and engine and fully rebuild it. Taking a run-down engine from the junk yard and rebuilding it so that it could run like new on a chassis was a prideful accomplishment.

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