RayK

Homes worthy of viewing

36 posts in this topic

Instead of listing every home I like in the good, I thought that I would list them here (through links). I would also like to invite other people to list homes that they think are worthy of viewing to list them here.

So, here are a couple more that I think are worthy:

http://www.hiltonhyland.com/address.php?property_ID=477

http://www.hiltonhyland.com/address.php?property_ID=466

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My favorite architect is John Lautner. My favorite house that I have experienced firsthand is Lautner's Sheats-Goldstein Residence.

The John Lautner resources page is a wonderful source for exploring Lautner's work. About two-thirds down the list is a section devoted to "Sheats Residence, Beverly Hills – 1962 (Goldstein Remodel – 1989)." Many, many links to photos and information about the house. These are particularly nice.

Here are just a few pictures of the "Sheats-Goldstein" house.

ardigest2.jpg

ardigest3.jpg

telegraph4.jpg

case2.jpg

case4.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am not very knowledgeable in architecture, but I am a fan of the architecture of Greene & Greene, two brothers who were important in the arts & craft movement in the early 20th Century.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greene_and_Greene_Architects

Interestingly, there is an architect named Matthew Bialecki who has made an updated version of the Greene & Greene "ultimate bungalow" concept. They posted several pictures on their website - please check the bedrrom (pic 6) in particular:

http://mbialeckiarch.com/portfolio/arts_cr...nce/index.shtml

The other residences are amazing too (check the kitchen in the Vidich residence!).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My favorite architect is John Lautner.

Are you familiar with Helena Arahuete? As I understand it, she is an architect who used to work with John Lautner, and is still building structures in a similar (but still original) style.

Here are some pictures from her Roscoe Residence in California.

post-427-1168821225_thumb.jpg post-427-1168821419_thumb.jpgpost-427-1168821449_thumb.jpgpost-427-1168821469_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My favorite architect is John Lautner.

Are you familiar with Helena Arahuete? As I understand it, she is an architect who used to work with John Lautner, and is still building structures in a similar (but still original) style.

Yes, she started working for Lautner in 1971, when I was speaking with him about building a house for us. Arahuete is a very talented architect, and learned quite a bit from Lautner, but I do not think she has reached or suprassed her teacher's level, as Lautner did with Wright.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Are you familiar with Helena Arahuete? As I understand it, she is an architect who used to work with John Lautner, and is still building structures in a similar (but still original) style.

I met Helena at an event sponsored by the John Lautner Foundation. It was held at the Harvey Aluminum House which she helped the current owners, Mitch Glazer and Kelly Lynch, to restore. See Page 6 here.

Speaking of restorations, Lautner's Tyler house has recently been restored and you can lease it for only $7,500 a month (click here).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you would like to have your dream home NOW, here are a few noteworthy homes currently on the market:

Frank Lloyd Wright

One of his finest Usonian Houses, the Pew House in Madison, WI, $1,550,000 (cheap by California standards)

(click here)

In Lake Forest, IL available for $2,395,000 (click here)

The Emil Bach House (1915) in Chicago available for $1,900,000 (click here)

The Cooke House (1953) in Virginia Beach, VA available for $2,500,000 (click here)

Eichler Homes

Near ARI in Orange County California (click here)

In Northern California (click here)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, she started working for Lautner in 1971, when I was speaking with him about building a house for us. Arahuete is a very talented architect, and learned quite a bit from Lautner, but I do not think she has reached or suprassed her teacher's level, as Lautner did with Wright.

Being Chief Architect in Lautner's office, I wonder how much influence she had on his later buildings. Some of my favorite Lautner residences were from that period. I agree that her buildings aren't quite as spectacular and unprecedented as Lautner's (or Wright's), but I like her better than any other living architect I know of (I don't know of that many, though, and would be interested to see others who are doing innovative stuff).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[...]but I like her better than any other living architect I know of (I don't know of that many, though, and would be interested to see others who are doing innovative stuff).

Wow! All you need to do is pick up a current issue of Dwell magazine (it's easy to ignore their crusade "for" the environment since they consistently feature some of the best buildings), Wallpaper*, Objekt (usually), Azure, A10 (harder to find, but B&N has it), Houses (only at Borders occasionally, but worth trying to find; it's Australian), Surface (not consistent, they are more about fashion), or Metropolis! Eight times out of ten you will find at least one really to extremely cool house or building featured with an accompanied photo spread, but often times there are several features of such quality in the same magazine, particularly Houses, Dwell, and Wallpaper*.

And this doesn't even delve into the abundance of photo books of modern architecture, much of which is incredible. If you're interested, it's a pretty easy task of just perusing the Architecture section at Barnes&Noble or Borders Books. Keep an eye out for book titles with words or phrases like, "new lofts," "houses" (really), "new apartments," and so forth. These stores stock trend in this section, and trend in modern architecture just happens to be mostly good!

I haven't really tried myself, but you will probably find some cool books at Amazon.com, too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Being Chief Architect in Lautner's office, I wonder how much influence she had on his later buildings. Some of my favorite Lautner residences were from that period.

The Harvey residence (1950), Malin residence (Chemosphere, 1960), Wolff residence (1961), Sheats residence (Goldstein, 1963), Reiner residence (Silvertop, 1963), and the Elrod residence (1968) all contain the essence of Lautner's style, and these were designed and built long before Arahuete arrived in 1971. I think the influence clearly flows FROM Lautner to Arahuete, not the other way around.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I think the influence clearly flows FROM Lautner to Arahuete, not the other way around.
Yes, maybe "influence" was the wrong word. What I meant was, I wonder if she did any of the actual designing in some of the later houses, and if so, how much. Clearly you're right about the flow of influence, because even in the buildings she's designed since John Lautner passed away, she seems to use many of the ideas that he used before she joined his team (I say "seems to," since I'm not anything approaching an expert in architecture--they look similar to me, but maybe they're different in some significant ways I'm overlooking; whereas John Lautner's techniques don't appear specifically similar to Frank Lloyd Wright's to me, although statements I've read from Lautner suggest that he was inspired and influenced by Wright's ideas).

I've never seen a John Lautner house in person, but my favorite one from the pictures is his Arango residence. I love the moat, that makes the house appear to be connected to the lake below it, and the vaulting concrete.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow! All you need to do is pick up a current issue of Dwell magazine (it's easy to ignore their crusade "for" the environment since they consistently feature some of the best buildings), Wallpaper*, Objekt (usually), Azure, A10 (harder to find, but B&N has it), Houses (only at Borders occasionally, but worth trying to find; it's Australian), Surface (not consistent, they are more about fashion), or Metropolis! Eight times out of ten you will find at least one really to extremely cool house or building featured with an accompanied photo spread, but often times there are several features of such quality in the same magazine, particularly Houses, Dwell, and Wallpaper*.

Thanks for the recommendations and links. Are there any specific architects you've discovered in those magazines whom I should look for in particular?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a little plug for the condominium building I live in, Cristalla.

One thing that caught my attention, when Kevin was buying the place over a year ago, is the slogan "22 stories, and way above everything else." It's so snotty, and so absolutely true.

We live in a 1 bd/ba with a den on the 8th floor - hardly the penthouse they advertise on the front page for $2.7 million - but the attention to detail and the quality of homes and amenities in the building at every level is wonderful. I think it is also a testament to the building that the builder and architect both live here as well.

Here are a few photos

The View of Seattle from the penthouse (currently for sale):

ph3_view_1774.jpg

kitchen_living.jpg

Similar to our kitchen:

kitchen_view.jpg

Click here to take virtual tour.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If anyone is in the market for a new home in the $33.5 million range, the Segel Residence by John Lautner is for sale. This is the house that was bought by Courtney Cox and David Arquette a few years ago.

07-158539.jpg07-158539-2.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This looks like an amazing place, but I have to say that I don't understand why they only show those two small, low resolution pictures. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Here is another fine and beautiful home that I think is worthy of viewing. When the realtor's page comes up scroll down to the house called Hidden Pines Lane and enjoy. Do not forget to take the virtual tour which is stunning.

http://www.rsfrealestate.com/Nav.aspx/Page...tusid%3dnotsold

Thanks, Ray. That is beautiful. I love that opening shot from the outside. It creates drama and expectation. It is too bad that the owner likes primitive art. It's not worthy of the house, which means, neither is his spirit. My uncle used to own a house pretty close to that same location. I remember visiting as a boy once and looking down and out of his front window to the sea a quarter of a mile away.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Brian, I agree with your statments and conclusion.

After looking at so many homes in my lifetime (I have made it a hobby), that I have learned to overlook other peoples furniture and accessories and evision what could be which is not always easy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Over thirty years ago, Stephen and I knocked on the door of this incredible house by John Lautner and the original owner, Marco Wolff, graciously -- and proudly -- took us on a tour of his home. Now it is for sale (here) for $5,995,000. Considering the last Lautner home on the market sold for $33,500,000, this is a bargain!

wolffhouse.jpg

swolffhouse4.jpgswolffhouse6.jpg

swolffhouse7.jpgswolffhouse9.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stunning! That's the stuff dreams are made of.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If you would like to have your dream home NOW, here are a few noteworthy homes currently on the market:

Frank Lloyd Wright

Today was the Wright Plus tour in Oak Park. Only 3 actual Wright-designed houses were on the tour this year, though there were several other houses from his contemporaries in the Prairie and Chicago schools. Of those on display this year (Balch, Adams, Fricke houses), I thought the Adams house was the nicest and best-preserved.

While the Wright houses remain in high demand because of their historical significance, at times I question how well-received a house designed like that today would be (even assuming necessary upgrades for HVAC and wiring). By modern standards, most of the Wright houses are pretty small for their price range, and Wright was a master at using geometric designs to make rooms look larger (or smaller), more open, etc. As someone on the tour pointed out, it's likely many of the houses wouldn't even meet building codes (or zoning commission rules). Nevertheless, it is a bit unfortunate that, apart from the concept of the Great Room, few of the Prairie School design elements became mainstream.

Of today's architects, I don't have much awareness, but I do like some of the work that Zaha Hadid has done (albeit it is mostly commercial and not residential, from what I can tell). Like Wright, she tests the boundaries of engineering, though, being a deconstructivist, she adheres to many design principles that run counter to Wright.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This weekend I hope to go to a local moving sale.

The good news is that they are selling classic mid-century modern designer furniture by Saarinen, Eames, Platner, Nelson, Grey, Bertoia, Naguchi, Panton plus Retro Dishes, Flatware, Rugs, Artworks, Lamps, Patio Furniture, Pottery.

jlegg.JPG

jltulip.JPG

jllr.JPG

The bad news is that I probably can't afford any of it.

The great news is that it is being held at a JOHN LAUTNER's Hatherall House that is currently on the market.

48350246.jpg

For more information see this L.A. Times article (link) and this description of the sale (link). For more on the Hatherall House, see this link.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites