Free Capitalist

Hype for the movie "300"

121 posts in this topic

I have finally found online a version of this trailer that does it justice. Everyone I've shown this to was very impressed, and many people had been completely blown away by this upcoming movie.

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=73...9&q=300+trailer

The story concerns the battle of Thermopylae, where a few hundred Greeks during the Persian Wars in 480BC had faced an innumerable Persian army of hundreds of thousands, and successfully defeated it over and over again, until a Greek traitor had shown the Persians a backdoor through the mountains, leading to the soldiers' extermination. The Greeks knew they were going to their deaths anyway, and by their heroism would buy for the West its freedom. An ancient Greek poet commemorated the battle with a 2,500 year-old epitaph upon the bodies of the slain: "Go tell the Spartans, stranger, that here we lie, obedient to their laws."

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An ancient Greek poet commemorated the battle with a 2,500 year-old epitaph upon the bodies of the slain: "Go tell the Spartans, stranger, that here we lie, obedient to their laws."

I prefer the translation from Steven Pressfield's Gates of Fire: "Go tell the Spartans, stranger passing by, that here obedient to their laws we lie". ;)

I can't wait! :D

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FreeCapitalist: "The Greeks knew they were going to their deaths anyway, and by their heroism would buy for the West its freedom."

I was taught, and have frequently heard, that the Greeks that went to Thermopylae thought they would buy some time for Greece to come to her senses Re the Persian threat; they had no idea that the Persians would stall there.

Nathanial Hale 1775: "...Steven Pressfield's Gates of Fire"

Gates of Fire, what the word "Thermopylae" means in Greek, is a great read. Though an epic novel, this book is packed with fascianting historic and military arts details.

Amazon

JohnRGT

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I was taught, and have frequently heard, that the Greeks that went to Thermopylae thought they would buy some time for Greece to come to her senses Re the Persian threat; they had no idea that the Persians would stall there.

There was no contention as to if Persia was a threat or not; that was well understood by all in the confederation. In Herodotus 7:146 it says "The private quarrels were settled, and three men [spies] sent off to Asia to collect information." This was approximately a year before the battle at Thermopylae. What you may be thinking of was the bickering between the Athenians and the Peloponnesians as to whether the confederated army and navy should fight to defend Attica (and Athens) or to pull back and fight it out at the Isthmus of Corinth. In the end Themistocles and the Athenians won out in that debate and the result was the amazing triumphs at Salamis and Plateae.

If you don't know, go back to the sources.;)

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It's also true that the Greeks were attempting to buy time.

The Spartans began building a wall at the Gulf of Corinth on the small chunk of land dividing Attica and the Peloponnesian Peninsula. The Athenians, always more daring than the conservative Spartans, urged for fighting as well as naval warfare in order to save Attica as well.

I prefer to think of Thermopylae as similar to the Alamo: in both instances, the men fighting for freedom took a heroic stance in order to halt, as much as possible, the oncoming might of the enemy force, so that the remaining forces might have more time to prepare and grow.

In both instances, the heroism worked, and shortly thereafter both the Persians and the Mexicans met disaster.

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It's ironic that Persia - now Iran - is still a thorn in the West's side. It occurs to me that there's another recurring theme throughout history, the heroic few against a much larger but fundamentally weaker force, even including the heroes of Atlas Shrugged. I've thought that there's a story to be written about a small group of men who decide to defeat Islamic insanity while a quavering West spins in circles trying to decide what to do. It may even be reality someday.

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The greater irony, Phil, is that now the West is not just centered on a small area, with a small population, such as Greece. Rather, the influence of the West now stretches across the world, with Western people (including those influenced by the West, such as India), numbering in the billions. And with such a large population, such a large area, such large dominion...we still have yet to defeat our greatest enemies: ourselves.

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There was no contention as to if Persia was a threat or not; that was well understood by all in the confederation. In Herodotus 7:146 it says "The private quarrels were settled, and three men [spies] sent off to Asia to collect information." This was approximately a year before the battle at Thermopylae. What you may be thinking of was the bickering between the Athenians and the Peloponnesians as to whether the confederated army and navy should fight to defend Attica (and Athens) or to pull back and fight it out at the Isthmus of Corinth. In the end Themistocles and the Athenians won out in that debate and the result was the amazing triumphs at Salamis and Plateae.

If you don't know, go back to the sources.:D

My (ancient) hero ;)

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This movie is based on a comic book series by Frank Miller. I haven't read it, but I will before seeing this movie.

300

Frank Miller is best known for resurrecting the Batman franchise with the Dark Knight Returns miniseries back in the late 80s. I suspect there are some intentional parallels with Atlas Shrugged in that series. He’s also thrown in a number of Ayn Rand references in his later work, some positive and some not so much.

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I remember seeing a movie, probably made in the 1960s, and, as I recall, named "Thermopylae". It was a good movie, and without the excesses in which most of today's movies engage. I could not find it on-line, but someone with more experience in searching movies might be able to.

In that movie, the Spartans had lambdas on their shields. In Desert Storm, we marked our vehicles with lambdas as an identification symbol, so allied aircraft would not shoot them. Does anyone know of a connection? Did the Spartans actually use a lambda as an ID symbol?

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In that movie, the Spartans had lambdas on their shields. In Desert Storm, we marked our vehicles with lambdas as an identification symbol, so allied aircraft would not shoot them. Does anyone know of a connection? Did the Spartans actually use a lambda as an ID symbol?

The lambda likely stood for Lacedaemonia, the area of land in the southern Peloponneses where Sparta was located. I am almost certain that the Athenians had an "A" (Alpha) on their shield. I am not sure if the Spartans had the same practice, though I would not doubt it.

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A simpler way to explain it would be that the L on the Spartan shields stood for Laconia, the region where Sparta was the capital city and from where they were from. We derive words from the name of that region, e.g. "laconic", speaking in an insightful but extremely compact way that the Spartans were famous for doing. "Then we will fight in the shade." "Come back with your shield, or on it." And yes, the L was on their shields.

As for the trailer, I find that I like it more than all of the subsequent ones, including all of the ones in much higher quality. I find that they have missed something in those trailers that they've captured so well in the first one. Does anyone else have the same reaction?

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Well, I just read S. Pressfield's "Gates of Fire", and I highly recommend it. It's very good and powerful.

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Well, I just read S. Pressfield's "Gates of Fire", and I highly recommend it. It's very good and powerful.

Joss, if you liked Gates of Fire, you'll love 300. What is interesting in this movie is not the literal approach taken, but how greatly all aspects are stylized. The Greek traitor is not merely evil, but made ugly and deformed, so that his inner vice is directly apprehensible by the viewer. He is the ugly hunchback with a Spartan shield that can be seen in the trailer. The same visual stylization of inner character goes for the Spartans and their look, and the Persians and their look (effete and gloomy). It's hard to believe that such a look and principled stylization to the film was achieved by a newcomer to moviemaking, but on the other hand perhaps nowadays it can only be expected from someone like him. I am really hoping more people will comment on whether they liked the trailer or not.

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Oh, I have no doubt I'll like the movie.

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I liked the trailer very much. I even downloaded it to my computer from movie-list.com so I can watch it again...

The visuals are very very interesting and very different from other historical epic movies I have seen. The few lines of dialog in the trailer were also great , especially the line "Spartans, tonight we dine in hell!"

I am definitely looking forward to that movie... eight more months!

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I am really hoping more people will comment on whether they liked the trailer or not.

I perceived the digitalized male bodies as pure eye candy. ;) I'll definitely see the movie, too.

Lady Brin

___________________

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What is interesting in this movie is not the literal approach taken, but how greatly all aspects are stylized. The Greek traitor is not merely evil, but made ugly and deformed, so that his inner vice is directly apprehensible by the viewer. He is the ugly hunchback with a Spartan shield that can be seen in the trailer.

Twisted in both mind and body and lusting for power... Shakespeare's King Richard The III.

The 300 Website has some informative video journals on the making of the movie. They tried to remain true to the comic book series: Link to 300

Judging by what I see in the trailers, looks like this might be a good one.

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I have watched all the trailers and I haven't been this excited about a movie since Star Wars Episode III. I thought Troy had some great potential, with awesome fighting and cinematography, but it's lack of a discernable moral message or theme really prevented it from being a really good film.

300 looks like it can provide even better action with a coherent execution of a theme and more admirable heroes. But, I have only the most basic of knowledge of the Battle of Thermopylae and its broader ramifications. The movie has roused my interests and I want to learn more but I don't want it to deter from my enjoyment of the movie (even though of course I know somewhat how it will end). For those of you who have more historical knowledge, do you think it's better (as far as my enjoyment of the movie is concerned) to start to learn about the events the movie portrays beforehand or wait till after I see the stylized, exaggerated film and then learn the complete historical truth?

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I am really hoping more people will comment on whether they liked the trailer or not.

Okay, you talked me into it. ;)

I first saw this trailer a while ago in the theater, and I was awestruck over the stylization of the film.

It is interesting reading the posts in this thread, getting different perspectives. I caution everyone about one thing, though. Putting together a movie trailer has become an art in itself, and I have been burned more than once by an actual movie being completely different from how the trailer is presented. Let's hope that this film delivers fully on expectations derived from the trailer.

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Victor Davis Hanson has been able to view it prior to it's release and has a review on his website... here. I hope that his final paragraph is the quintessence of the movie, which it seems to be.

"If critics think that 300 reduces and simplifies the meaning of Thermopylae into freedom versus tyranny, they should reread carefully ancient accounts and then blame Herodotus, Plutarch, and Diodorus — who long ago boasted that Greek freedom was on trial against Persian autocracy, free men in superior fashion dying for their liberty, their enslaved enemies being whipped to enslave others."

-VDH

The developers of this movie and Frank Miller are fans of Victor Davis Hanson's, which increases one's hope as well.

I perceived the digitalized male bodies as pure eye candy. smile.gif I'll definitely see the movie, too.

They weren't digitilzed at all; check out the "Spartan Training" video on the 300 web site.

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Annoying mistakes I made : "it's " should be "its" and "digitilzed" should be "digitalized" ;)

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