Betsy Speicher

THE FORUM and My New Life

32 posts in this topic

I've had a horrible loss, but life goes on. I owe it to me and I owe it to Stephen's memory to go on seeking and promoting our values. While some things will remain, others will change for me.

I have closed my software consulting business and my new full-time job will be the administration and primary moderation for THE FORUM. It is a unique Objectivist internet venue worth preserving, but I have another, more personal, reason. One of my heroes, Benjamin Franklin, wrote "If you would not want to be forgotten as soon as you are dead, either write something worth reading or do things worth writing." Stephen wrote so much worth reading -- 7,870 posts on THE FORUM alone -- and this is his legacy. This is where Stephen still lives, and I will see to it that his words and thoughts will live forever. I will soon redraft my will and provide an endowment to maintain THE FORUM and most of Stephen's other writings and works, on the internet and as digital media, in perpetuity.

As the new administrator, I have much to learn about THE FORUM's software and how to use it, so it will be a while before I can do things as well as Stephen did. Right now there are over 100 people who have applied to be members who need to be approved, but it will take me a few weeks learn how to do it and to clear the backlog. I appreciate the patience of those who have been waiting.

In addition to running THE FORUM, I will continue publishing my CyberNet. I will write books and articles on practical epistemology, psychology, education, and humor. I will go on the Cordair Arts Cruise in January as I originally planned. I will stay close to my friends and get together with them often to socialize, for intellectual discussions and events, and to enjoy plays, movies, music, and art. Even though Stephen is gone, I find some of the same joy we shared when I am with people I value and who value me. Friends will be a big part of my new life.

Life goes on.

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I've had a horrible loss, but life goes on. I owe it to me and I owe it to Stephen's memory to go on seeking and promoting our values. While some things will remain, others will change for me.

I have closed my software consulting business and my new full-time job will be the administration and primary moderation for THE FORUM. It is a unique Objectivist internet venue worth preserving, but I have another, more personal, reason. One of my heroes, Benjamin Franklin, wrote "If you would not want to be forgotten as soon as you are dead, either write something worth reading or do things worth writing." Stephen wrote so much worth reading -- 7,870 posts on THE FORUM alone -- and this is his legacy. This is where Stephen still lives, and I will see to it that his words and thoughts will live forever. I will soon redraft my will and provide an endowment to maintain THE FORUM and most of Stephen's other writings and works, on the internet and as digital media, in perpetuity.

As the new administrator, I have much to learn about THE FORUM's software and how to use it, so it will be a while before I can do things as well as Stephen did. Right now there are over 100 people who have applied to be members who need to be approved, but it will take me a few weeks learn how to do it and to clear the backlog. I appreciate the patience of those who have been waiting.

In addition to running THE FORUM, I will continue publishing my CyberNet. I will write books and articles on practical epistemology, psychology, education, and humor. I will go on the Cordair Arts Cruise in January as I originally planned. I will stay close to my friends and get together with them often to socialize, for intellectual discussions and events, and to enjoy plays, movies, music, and art. Even though Stephen is gone, I find some of the same joy we shared when I am with people I value and who value me. Friends will be a big part of my new life.

Life goes on.

All power to you Betsy; you have many friends who are pleased to see you continue with what is important to you. Stephen was a very smart man, and I for one, am pleased his posts will remain for all to see. His opinions were always well founded. I'm sure The Forum will sail on smoothly under your management.

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That's great Betsy. Live as a value pursuer, as you've always done.

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Betsy, Given that you've designed and developed systems more complex than this, I have no doubt that you will quickly become an expert in The Forum software.

While I'm away from home, this has become my virtual coffeehouse next door, if not home itself. Thank you so much for making sure that it stays an active concern and that Stephen's work will be preserved. He was an inspiration. As are you.

Thanks.

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This is excellent life-affirming news. Let us know how we can support your efforts with the Forum.

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Yes, I agree with what others have written and want to publicly thank you for continuing THE FORUM. Stephen's words, and the method of thought behind them, will be of great value to all the generations who come after ours--as are your words and thinking, Besty. All the best to you.

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All the best to you in this new phase of your life. I see the strength of steel, the grace of a lady, and the focus of an engineer; for these are all required to make a difficult move seem natural.

AspenSantaFeBallet.jpg

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Betsy,

You have my undying support. It's so refreshing that amid such a loss, you are not only able to continue living, but to forge ahead. Lesser mortals would wallow in self pity, but not you.

You are a real inspiration.

Best,

Jason

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Dear Betsy... words fail, in times like these. Instead, I put up a magnificent poem I recently discovered, because of its special significance. That one part especially strikes at me:

but something ere the end,

Some work of noble note, may yet be done,

Not unbecoming men that strove with Gods.

I am greatly touched and affected by your devotion and this forum's continued existence. Thank you for that. I would wish that instead of April month devoted to especial civility, this would be extended year-round, but I fear we're much too rowdy and spirited in all our views and values. :) Thanks for allowing us a place to express and share those.

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I'm mostly a "lurker" here, but wanted to express my best wishes to you, Betsy, as you make the best of this new phase of life. I look forward to your future writings!

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Betsy,

I wish to express my thanks to you for continuing this wonderful FORUM.

You set an example for me and for everyone here !

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Betsy,

Not a day has passed over the last several weeks that I have not thought of you and of Stephen. Your quiet calm in the face of a terrible tragedy is, indeed, an inspiration.

I am so glad that you will be maintaining this wonderful Forum and Stephen's invaluable legacy. I will continue to think of you as you now embark on a new life.

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I have closed my software consulting business and my new full-time job will be the administration and primary moderation for THE FORUM.

As a fellow software developer and a Producer Advocate, it always saddens me a bit to see a software business closed down--especially if it's yours, Betsy!--but I'm very glad to hear about your new full-time job. :) Having you at the helm is a guarantee that THE FORUM will continue to be the kind of place I like to visit!

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My utmost wishes to you as always, Mrs. S.

I'm curious to know if you will hold seminars for your work on induction. I'd be interested in a comprehensive presentation of your views on the subject, among others.

Are you also working on a theory of propositions?

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I'm curious to know if you will hold seminars for your work on induction. I'd be interested in a comprehensive presentation of your views on the subject, among others.

I plan to eventually, and I am leaning toward doing so in an internet venue.

Are you also working on a theory of propositions?

Not really, and for the same reason that Ayn Rand, in writing about the nature of concepts, did not develop a "theory of language." Propositions are involved in induction just as language is involved with concept formation, but that is not primarily the essence of those processes. But then, modern philosophers often look only at the concrete manifestations of an epistemological process rather than the purpose of the process.

Induction, like any valid epistemological process, is the identification of reality for the purpose of gaining and keeping values. The essence of induction, in particular, is the identification of causes.

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A Woman of Valor, who can find her? Her worth is beyond that of precious stones ....

Prov 30:10

You are a very tough lady, Betsy.

Bob Kolker

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I am forever behind in taking notice of the Notices!

Betsy, thank you for your example, which is all the more valuable to me because it is a result of your character, and not something put on for the masses. There are no bromides and platitudes here, just life naturally lived.

Thank you, as well, for keeping THE FORUM going. It is the one place where I know the standards are high, and where the consequences of a benevolent view of the universe can be enjoyed consistently. Both of those values are of upmost importance to me, and rare as hens teeth.

I am grateful to have access to Stephen's thoughts. It helps to read what he has written, especially with the wound being still raw. I do feel lonesome for him, as I'm sure others here do.

We're so lucky to still have you!

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Thank you, as well, for keeping THE FORUM going. It is the one place where I know the standards are high, and where the consequences of a benevolent view of the universe can be enjoyed consistently. Both of those values are of upmost importance to me, and rare as hens teeth.

It is for people like you, Janet, but mostly for people like me, that I want to keep THE FORUM going.

Stephen still lives here and so can I. It is the only internet venue that is run exactly as I would run one -- especially now that I do.

We're so lucky to still have you!

Thank you. I intend to be here a long time.

One thing that worried me was that, like Stephen, I have a family history of heart disease. Stephen's careful attention to his diet and rigorous exercise program bought him 27 more years of life than his father had, but eventually heredity caught up with him. It wasn't until they did the angiogram in the hospital that we discovered his coronary arteries were clogged and calcified beyond repair despite his vigorous lifestyle and normal EKGs.

I didn't want that kind of surprise. I consulted with the cardiologist at UCLA and my own internist and they suggested I have a new kind of dye-contrast CT angiography that gives a 3D image of the coronary arteries and a view of the heart in action. I did, and much to my relief, the results were very reassuring. A calcium score of under 10 indicates a less than 1% chance of a heart attack in the next 5 years and mine is only 3. The ejection fraction measures the ability of the heart to pump blood, with 55-70 being normal. Mine is a solid 68. The scan showed I have wide-open coronary arteries with absolutely no sign of soft plaque or any other obstruction or narrowing.

Maybe this means I don't take after my Dad who had his first heart attack in his fifties but, instead, might be more like my grandmother's sisters who who lived to be 102 and 107. I hope so.

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I didn't want that kind of surprise. I consulted with the cardiologist at UCLA and my own internist and they suggested I have a new kind of dye-contrast CT angiography that gives a 3D image of the coronary arteries and a view of the heart in action. I did, and much to my relief, the results were very reassuring. A calcium score of under 10 indicates a less than 1% chance of a heart attack in the next 5 years and mine is only 3. The ejection fraction measures the ability of the heart to pump blood, with 55-70 being normal. Mine is a solid 68. The scan showed I have wide-open coronary arteries with absolutely no sign of soft plaque or any other obstruction or narrowing.

Maybe this means I don't take after my Dad who had his first heart attack in his fifties but, instead, might be more like my grandmother's sisters who who lived to be 102 and 107. I hope so.

I'm happy to hear about that.

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I didn't want that kind of surprise. I consulted with the cardiologist at UCLA and my own internist and they suggested I have a new kind of dye-contrast CT angiography that gives a 3D image of the coronary arteries and a view of the heart in action. I did, and much to my relief, the results were very reassuring. A calcium score of under 10 indicates a less than 1% chance of a heart attack in the next 5 years and mine is only 3. The ejection fraction measures the ability of the heart to pump blood, with 55-70 being normal. Mine is a solid 68. The scan showed I have wide-open coronary arteries with absolutely no sign of soft plaque or any other obstruction or narrowing.

Maybe this means I don't take after my Dad who had his first heart attack in his fifties but, instead, might be more like my grandmother's sisters who who lived to be 102 and 107. I hope so.

I'm happy to hear about that.

Yes indeed; that's great news.

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Betsy,

I'm glad to hear the good news about your own situation!

I too have problems bequeathed to me by those on both sides of my family. I had one doctor call me a genetic garbage dump! (Bloody cheek!) I've already messed up all their prognostications. (I do what I can. :lol:) All anyone can do is live everyday to the full. I've been told to live everyday as though it were my last, but I think that's a bunch of hogwash. While I certainly enjoy every day, I live and plan for the future.

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