Carlos

Get a Fire Extinguisher!

23 posts in this topic

About fifteen minutes ago my neighbors in my apartment complex accidentally started a large grease fire. The fire was growing to the point that flames were starting to reach and catch other parts of their apartment, where if something wasn't done fast, the fire was going to get beyond the point of no return in terms of stopping it. Luckily another neighbor had a small fire-extinguisher that he kept in his truck, and he sprinted in and put it out.

Considering that it took another 7-10 minutes for the Firetrucks to get there, had no one there been in possession of a fire-extinguisher, the fire might have become uncontrollable and destroyed their room, and possibly our entire complex.

After this event, I'm going to get a fire-extinguisher for myself, and for my girlfriend, and I recommend everyone else get one as well!

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Great idea, Carlos!

But I wonder, does your town (or apartment complex management) have a mandatory fire extinguisher requirement on its books? Without entering an opinion as to the appropriateness of the government's mandating any such thing, I thought this was standard practice for apartment complexes around the country.

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After this event, I'm going to get a fire-extinguisher for myself, and for my girlfriend, and I recommend everyone else get one as well!

I heartily second this recommendation. A couple months ago I almost set my kitchen on fire when grease in a pan caught fire, and the flames rose to about 3 feet :P !! I didn't have a fire extinguisher and had to douse the flames with water.

.....Without entering an opinion as to the appropriateness of the government's mandating any such thing, I thought this was standard practice for apartment complexes around the country.

After the incident in my kitchen, the same thought occured to me, so I asked around. Apparently, a smoke detector is mandatory but a fire extinguisher is optional. I ended up buying one on my own.

Soon after I bought my fire extingisher, my DVD player started to smoke! Luckily, I noticed the smoke in time, but I sure was glad that I had the extinguisher handy.

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Just to get the other side I will add my own history. I have literally cooked thousands of times in my life time and not once have I ever started or observed a fire. Some of that cooking was at McDonalds, where I cooked in a frenzied pace, for 2.5 years and I still never started a fire nor witnessed one.

Of course I am not saying not to go out and buy a fire extinguisher, if you think you need one, I just never have.

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I heartily second this recommendation. A couple months ago I almost set my kitchen on fire when grease in a pan caught fire, and the flames rose to about 3 feet :P !! I didn't have a fire extinguisher and had to douse the flames with water.

Yikes. Incidentally, grease, being oil, doesn't mix well with water; if you don't have a fire extinguisher, baking soda might work better. It releases CO2 when heated.

I thought fire extinguishers were mandantory at apartments but apparently not. We have a fire extinguisher on every level of our house, plus a smaller one just for the kitchen. Given the speed that a fire can spread, they're cheap insurance. (I guess there are those who think $30 is too much to spend to protect their house.)

After moving to a house - whatever its own set of difficulties - I'm really glad to not be living in apartments anymore. My downstairs neighbor had a cheap clock that burst into flames a few years ago; the first I knew about it were the fire engines pulling up in front. Fortunately the damage was limited. The complex had extinguishers on every floor but they hadn't used it. Being forced to be physically connected to the potential carelessness or bad choices of neighbors is one excellent reason to live in a house if possible.

I think there's also a crime issue, especially recently. There is less security around apartments and they tend to be in poorer neighborhoods. About a week ago I read a hair-raising news story about a crime that was committed at my old apartment complex at almost the exact covered parking spot where I used to park. Two thugs demanded the keys and purse of a woman who lived there. She refused and one of them shot her with a .45 pistol. There were cops in the adjacent complex who heard the shots and managed to arrest one of the perps. Incredibly, given the size of the weapon, she survived. While the immediate neighborhood is solidly middle class, there are much poorer areas not that far away. Reading that strongly validated my decision to get out of the city and into a much safer/nicer neighborhood, in a house.

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(I guess there are those who think $30 is too much to spend to protect their house.)

I do not think $30 is to much, I just choose to protect my house with my mind and be conscious of every activity that I do. And it has worked as I have now been alive for 38.5 years without being in one fire, imagen that.

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I do not think $30 is to much, I just choose to protect my house with my mind and be conscious of every activity that I do. And it has worked as I have now been alive for 38.5 years without being in one fire, imagen that.

And of course, unforeseen and unpredictable accidents never happen, and because something has never happened before, it can never happen.

Seriously Ray, I suggest that you check your premises.

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I do not think $30 is to much, I just choose to protect my house with my mind and be conscious of every activity that I do. And it has worked as I have now been alive for 38.5 years without being in one fire, imagen that.

I have a little fire extinguisher under the sink in the kitchen. I really don't expect to have to use it, but I like knowing it is there.

That is also why I have insurance against fire and theft (I live in one of America's safest cities) and $2 million liability insurance although I am extremely unlikely to be liable for that much damage to someone else. I believe in prudent and rational living, but I believe in insurance too.

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I heartily second this recommendation. A couple months ago I almost set my kitchen on fire when grease in a pan caught fire, and the flames rose to about 3 feet :P !! I didn't have a fire extinguisher and had to douse the flames with water.

A few years ago I was a beginner at cooking with a wok, making a stir fry with regular vegetable oil, which, as anyone familiar with Chinese cooking will know, does not withstand the high temperatures of wok use. Without a spill or anything popping or falling out, suddenly the oil just burst into flames at least two feet hight right in the wok.

Fortunately, I don't get flustered easily. With a brief "Oh...well...look at that," I calmly picked up the wok with my left hand and held it low, toward the middle of the room, flames still flaring. After satisfying my curiosity by observing the blaze for a few seconds, I opened a cupboard and got out the baking soda with my right hand. A few seconds later the fire was out.

I have owned a fire extinguisher ever since I bought my house. I must have been a little flustered, though, becaues during that little emergency I completely forgot about the extinguisher's existence. Still, I'm glad it's there.

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Seriously Ray, I suggest that you check your premises.

I have never said that accidents do not happen, as they do. But that does not mean that they will happen and I have decided to expect great things to happen and when the accident comes I will use my mind and over-come it which is what I have done in many other circumstances. I fell into a hole 13 feet deep and landed on my head and broke my neck, I over-came it. I was run off Interstate-5 while driving my motorcycle and went flying through the air going over 55 miles per hour, I over-came it. I fell through freezing ice while riding a horse through a Buffalo Blizzard, I over-came it. When the accident pops up I will over-come it, as I have in the past. But, I will not waste much time and effort dwelling over something that will most likely never come.

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Yikes. Incidentally, grease, being oil, doesn't mix well with water; if you don't have a fire extinguisher, baking soda might work better. It releases CO2 when heated.

I knew that water was the wrong medium to use, especially coz I have an electric range, so I was very leery when I was throwing water about. Unfortunately, I didn't know about baking soda trick until later. :P

[i do not think $30 is to much, I just choose to protect my house with my mind and be conscious of every activity that I do. And it has worked as I have now been alive for 38.5 years without being in one fire, imagen that.

Ray, I agree that my kitchen fire was entirely due to absent-mindedness on my part (I put the pan on the range and quite stupidly forgot about it and focused on a solving a problem from work). I have since been very careful, and have made a conscious effort not to leave anything on the stove un-attended. However, I live in a high-rise condo and I can't rely on all my neighbors being conscious of their every activity while cooking, burning a candle, etc. So, I think it is prudent to have an extinguisher handy, in-case a small fire can be quickly contained before spreading to neighboring apartments and destroying a lot of property.

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Every year 28 million children between the ages of 5-14 ride a bike. Every year 300,000 end up in the emergency room from an accident. This totals just above 1% of the total recorded children that ride a bike. If I take a certain premise to it's conclusion I should stop riding a bike as there is a 1% chance that I might have an accident. Wrong, I made it all the way through my youth without getting hurt from riding a bike nor did I wear a helmet.

I do not have a fire extinguisher in my house and have never had reason to use one in my house. I have always been conscious while I was cooking and understood what fire has the capacity to do if used in an irrational way. My insurance is my own self-confidence in knowing how to handle fire without causing harm to myself and others.

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Ray, I agree that my kitchen fire was entirely due to absent-mindedness on my part (I put the pan on the range and quite stupidly forgot about it and focused on a solving a problem from work). I have since been very careful, and have made a conscious effort not to leave anything on the stove un-attended. However, I live in a high-rise condo and I can't rely on all my neighbors being conscious of their every activity while cooking, burning a candle, etc. So, I think it is prudent to have an extinguisher handy, in-case a small fire can be quickly contained before spreading to neighboring apartments and destroying a lot of property.

I agree, in your context it might be a wise thing to do.

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I think there's also a crime issue, especially recently. There is less security around apartments and they tend to be in poorer neighborhoods.

Are you talking about suburban apartments or urban apartments--they're two different animals. The vast majority of apartments in urban areas are less theft-prone than the houses. For one thing, the winding hallways and stairs make it a pain in the ass to try to navigate back to the exist with a bunch of loot, not to mention the stairs. For another, it is extremely rare that an urban apartment building doesn't have a huge steel cage with coded entry before you even get to the door of the building. And, in my experience, the people who live in those buildings are very serious about making sure nobody enters the gate as they are leaving.

Apartments are a big fire hazard though... when I was in DC, apparently there was a crackhead living two floors down from me. One night he passed out with his torch going and set the building on fire. Three apartments on the first floor were toast. Luckily, only the guy who started the fire was hurt (he died), and my apartment wasn't damaged. But I did have to take the next couple of days off work to clean smoke residue off of everything in my place.

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Are you talking about suburban apartments or urban apartments--they're two different animals. The vast majority of apartments in urban areas are less theft-prone than the houses.

I suppose that depends on the city in question. Indianapolis has very few of the kinds of apartments that you mention, with gated/coded entryways. I would suppose that other cities such as NYC would have many of them. Also, I don't mean skyscraper condominiums that are owned - those are on a par with, or sometimes greatly exceed, "real houses", not apartments.

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I suppose that depends on the city in question. Indianapolis has very few of the kinds of apartments that you mention, with gated/coded entryways. I would suppose that other cities such as NYC would have many of them. Also, I don't mean skyscraper condominiums that are owned - those are on a par with, or sometimes greatly exceed, "real houses", not apartments.

lol, and I guess it depends on what you consider a city. :P We snobby urbanites would consider Indianapolis a really big suburb.

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lol, and I guess it depends on what you consider a city. :P We snobby urbanites would consider Indianapolis a really big suburb.

Except that the population of San Francisco is less than Indianapolis :P :P

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lol, and I guess it depends on what you consider a city. :P We snobby urbanites would consider Indianapolis a really big suburb.

Except that the population of San Francisco is less than Indianapolis :P;)

Thanks, Phil. That gave me a nice laugh. :P

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lol, and I guess it depends on what you consider a city. :P We snobby urbanites would consider Indianapolis a really big suburb.

Except that the population of San Francisco is less than Indianapolis :P :P

Well, duh. San Francisco is onlyl 47 square miles. Indianapolis is like a million.... (it's really 362, yielding around one eighth the density of SF).

Besides, it's not about population... it's about attitude. *strikes an aloof pose*

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Well, duh. San Francisco is onlyl 47 square miles. Indianapolis is like a million.... (it's really 362, yielding around one eighth the density of SF).

Besides, it's not about population... it's about attitude. *strikes an aloof pose*

Haha, you win. :P At least we don't get (many) earthquakes. :P Not to mention the relative ability to buy a house. (Actually I am not in Indianapolis any longer, but close by.)

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Besides, it's not about population... it's about attitude. *strikes an aloof pose*
I'll take the attitude in Phoenix over San Francisco ANY day. :P

Oh, and the weather, too!

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Besides, it's not about population... it's about attitude. *strikes an aloof pose*
I'll take the attitude in Phoenix over San Francisco ANY day. :P

Oh, and the weather, too!

Amen, brother! :P

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