Kitty Hawk

Rex Barks

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I'm working my way through Rex Barks. I wonder if I am misunderstanding something, or if there are errors (or typos) in the answers at the back of the book. In exercise 3-12, for example, we are diagramming sentences with Intransitive Linking verbs, along with their Complements, either Predicate Adjective, or Predicate Noun. In sentences 7, 8, and 10, I believe the Complements are all Predicate Nouns, but the answer key labels them all Predicate Adjectives. Here are the sentences:

7. That old man has remained our club's president for years.

I believe "presdent" is a Predicate Noun, but the answer key says Predicate Adjective.

8. In Nellie's eyes, Harry is a prince.

I say "prince" is a PN, the answer key says PA.

10. Should he always be the winner of every race?

I think "winner" is a PN, the key says PA.

So is the answer key wrong, or am I misunderstanding something?

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I'm working my way through Rex Barks. I wonder if I am misunderstanding something, or if there are errors (or typos) in the answers at the back of the book. In exercise 3-12, for example, we are diagramming sentences with Intransitive Linking verbs, along with their Complements, either Predicate Adjective, or Predicate Noun. In sentences 7, 8, and 10, I believe the Complements are all Predicate Nouns, but the answer key labels them all Predicate Adjectives. Here are the sentences:

7. That old man has remained our club's president for years.

I believe "presdent" is a Predicate Noun, but the answer key says Predicate Adjective.

8. In Nellie's eyes, Harry is a prince.

I say "prince" is a PN, the answer key says PA.

10. Should he always be the winner of every race?

I think "winner" is a PN, the key says PA.

So is the answer key wrong, or am I misunderstanding something?

I think the answer key is wrong. According to this web page

Definition

A predicate adjective is an adjective that is used to predicate an attribute of the subject.

Examples (English)

Roses are red.

Noses often become red.

and according to this web page

Definition

A predicate noun is a noun (or noun phrase) that is used to predicate a description or identification of the subject.

Examples (English)

He is a good man.

He became a mathematician.

A PN is a noun and a PA is an adjective.

In your examples,

7. That old man has remained our club's president for years. "President" is a noun.

8. In Nellie's eyes, Harry is a prince. "Prince" is a noun.

10. Should he always be the winner of every race? "Winner" is a noun.

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I think the answer key is wrong.
Definition

A predicate adjective is an adjective that is used to predicate an attribute of the subject.

Examples (English)

Roses are red.

Noses often become red.

and according to this web page

Definition

A predicate noun is a noun (or noun phrase) that is used to predicate a description or identification of the subject.

Examples (English)

He is a good man.

He became a mathematician.

A PN is a noun and a PA is an adjective.

In your examples,

7. That old man has remained our club's president for years. "President" is a noun.

8. In Nellie's eyes, Harry is a prince. "Prince" is a noun.

10. Should he always be the winner of every race? "Winner" is a noun.

That's what I thought, too. I guess that is one of the pitfalls of using a self-teaching guide. There's no teacher there to confirm there was a typo or a mistake in the answer key.

Thanks for the help!

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That's what I thought, too. I guess that is one of the pitfalls of using a self-teaching guide. There's no teacher there to confirm there was a typo or a mistake in the answer key.

Since they use Rex Barks at the VanDamme Academy, you might want to write to Lisa and ask her.

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I'm working my way through Rex Barks. I wonder if I am misunderstanding something, or if there are errors (or typos) in the answers at the back of the book. In exercise 3-12, for example, we are diagramming sentences with Intransitive Linking verbs, along with their Complements, either Predicate Adjective, or Predicate Noun. In sentences 7, 8, and 10, I believe the Complements are all Predicate Nouns, but the answer key labels them all Predicate Adjectives. Here are the sentences:

7. That old man has remained our club's president for years.

I believe "presdent" is a Predicate Noun, but the answer key says Predicate Adjective.

8. In Nellie's eyes, Harry is a prince.

I say "prince" is a PN, the answer key says PA.

10. Should he always be the winner of every race?

I think "winner" is a PN, the key says PA.

So is the answer key wrong, or am I misunderstanding something?

I worked through a lot of that book too, and think that the answer key is right in this case.

The predicate adjective in 7 is 'president' because 'our club's president' describes the subject of the sentence, 'man' after the linking verb, 'has remained.'

In 8 and 9 the examples are similar, i.e. 'prince' describes the subject 'Harry,' after the linking verb 'is,' and 'winner' describes the subject 'he.' In sentence 9, I can't remember if 'should' (as in 'should be') is an integral part of the linking verb. I think so, but don't quote me on that.

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--------------

The predicate adjective in 7 is 'president' because 'our club's president' describes the subject of the sentence, 'man' after the linking verb, 'has remained.'

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Don't all predicates describe the subject? He is Harry. He is president. He is handsome. The issue is not one of description, but of the part of speech in the predicate. Is it a noun or an adjective? At least that's the way I understand it.

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The predicate adjective in 7 is 'president' because 'our club's president' describes the subject of the sentence, 'man' after the linking verb, 'has remained.'

---------------

Don't all predicates describe the subject? He is Harry. He is president. He is handsome. The issue is not one of description, but of the part of speech in the predicate. Is it a noun or an adjective? At least that's the way I understand it.

I was thinking of the whole predicate functioning as an adjective, and I guess you're pointing out that they always do. I guess so. I don't know. It's been too long since I worked on this, and I'm feeling too lazy to go back, look it up, and figure it out all over again. But I will say that when I worked through the book, I thought that the answer key was accurate, but... hmmm.

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I decided to look up at least the answers in my book.

For exercise 3-12, the answer key in my book lists

president (PR) as a PN in 7 and

prince (PR) as a PN in 8

but it lists

winner (WIN) as a PA in 10

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They're all PNs; the answer key is wrong--it's clear-cut.

Some examples are not so obvious:

"The color of her gown was such a red as made the eyes ache."

In this case, "red" is a noun, so it's a PN. (The gown had the quality of red, but the color is red.)

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Hello Kitty,

I believe that you are right. The evidence that "prince" and "winner" are nouns, not adjectives is that "prince" is preceded by the article "a" and "winner" is preceded by the article "the".

I'm working my way through Rex Barks. I wonder if I am misunderstanding something, or if there are errors (or typos) in the answers at the back of the book. In exercise 3-12, for example, we are diagramming sentences with Intransitive Linking verbs, along with their Complements, either Predicate Adjective, or Predicate Noun. In sentences 7, 8, and 10, I believe the Complements are all Predicate Nouns, but the answer key labels them all Predicate Adjectives. Here are the sentences:

7. That old man has remained our club's president for years.

I believe "presdent" is a Predicate Noun, but the answer key says Predicate Adjective.

8. In Nellie's eyes, Harry is a prince.

I say "prince" is a PN, the answer key says PA.

10. Should he always be the winner of every race?

I think "winner" is a PN, the key says PA.

So is the answer key wrong, or am I misunderstanding something?

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Hello Kitty,

I believe that you are right. The evidence that "prince" and "winner" are nouns, not adjectives is that "prince" is preceded by the article "a" and "winner" is preceded by the article "the".

I'm working my way through Rex Barks. I wonder if I am misunderstanding something, or if there are errors (or typos) in the answers at the back of the book. In exercise 3-12, for example, we are diagramming sentences with Intransitive Linking verbs, along with their Complements, either Predicate Adjective, or Predicate Noun. In sentences 7, 8, and 10, I believe the Complements are all Predicate Nouns, but the answer key labels them all Predicate Adjectives. Here are the sentences:

7. That old man has remained our club's president for years.

I believe "presdent" is a Predicate Noun, but the answer key says Predicate Adjective.

8. In Nellie's eyes, Harry is a prince.

I say "prince" is a PN, the answer key says PA.

10. Should he always be the winner of every race?

I think "winner" is a PN, the key says PA.

So is the answer key wrong, or am I misunderstanding something?

My first thought was that that they are substantive adjectives. That is to say adjectives used as nouns, as in "the cowardly", which is actually an adjective where the noun is an implied man, people or whatever it may be. This, doesn't seem to be the case, so I would say that there is simply an error in the answer key.

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