Cometmaker

Aerogel

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When I first saw a block of the stuff, I thought of membrillo/quince (except that the stuff is white, not rusty orange/vermillion), and then a steamed sticky rice cake dessert. But that's just because I'm a good eater. I've been tracking its uses since 2001 when a feature article appeared in IEEE Spectrum that year. I enjoy all of its aspects, from its mountaineering applications, to comet dust collection, to the way it reminds me of delicious things to eat. :P I'm curious about agricutural uses by just modifying the insulation properties to reduce antibiotic resistance in bovines. Would be great if the insulation absorbed the downwind smell of Bucky (my Nubian male goat) too!

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When I first saw a block of the stuff, I thought of membrillo/quince (except that the stuff is white, not rusty orange/vermillion), and then a steamed sticky rice cake dessert. But that's just because I'm a good eater. I've been tracking its uses since 2001 when a feature article appeared in IEEE Spectrum that year. I enjoy all of its aspects, from its mountaineering applications, to comet dust collection, to the way it reminds me of delicious things to eat. :D I'm curious about agricutural uses by just modifying the insulation properties to reduce antibiotic resistance in bovines. Would be great if the insulation absorbed the downwind smell of Bucky (my Nubian male goat) too!

I've thought of a number of uses for the stuff. It's certainly very interesting though I haven't yet had the chance to touch it for real. "Solid smoke" seems to be the closest analogy. The last I read, it was extremely expensive to make, so its economic uses are limited; has that improved lately?

And I have to ask, why the heck do you have a goat as a pet? :P (I did watch a show recently about a scientist whose company was using genetically modified goats to produce complex drugs that could be extracted from the goat's milk; he personally had some as pets and characterized them as intelligent, independent animals (well, for animals)).

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I wonder if this "aerogel" is similar to what is used to make aerogel capacitors. These use a type of carbon foam called "carbon aerogel" that results in a huge surface area in a small volume - which, together with close spacing of the "plates" (conductors) is what one needs in a high-capacitance capacitor. They can have a huge capacitance in a small package - say 50 farads* in a few cubic inches.

*I thought this was a misprint when I first read it, because I'm used to capacitances being expressed in mere microfarads. But it's true.

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I wonder if this "aerogel" is similar to what is used to make aerogel capacitors. These use a type of carbon foam called "carbon aerogel" that results in a huge surface area in a small volume - which, together with close spacing of the "plates" (conductors) is what one needs in a high-capacitance capacitor. They can have a huge capacitance in a small package - say 50 farads* in a few cubic inches.

*I thought this was a misprint when I first read it, because I'm used to capacitances being expressed in mere microfarads. But it's true.

It's the same stuff, its other popular name is Electrochemical Double-Layer Capacitors. The extremely low level of current leakage, plus tremendous volumetric capacitance, are amazing! The delivery of frequent pulses, quick charge time and the bridge power capabilities make for exciting applications for all sorts of portable computing devices.

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I've thought of a number of uses for the stuff. It's certainly very interesting though I haven't yet had the chance to touch it for real. "Solid smoke" seems to be the closest analogy. The last I read, it was extremely expensive to make, so its economic uses are limited; has that improved lately?

And I have to ask, why the heck do you have a goat as a pet?

It's still very expensive unless you have access to a federal research facility or are part of the hired press/publicity junket. Always good to have useful hobbies like writing articles!

Bucky and the female Nubian goats are verocious and keep the land manicured. It's just Bucky that smells, though. The Temminck's tragopans love a diverse diet too, so I trained them to get down from the trees and ride on the goats from one place to another. The goats don't mind, and I actually get to see the male plummage brilliantly displayed on backdrops of white and tan instead of them hiding up in the foliage.

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When I first saw a block of the stuff, I thought of membrillo/quince (except that the stuff is white, not rusty orange/vermillion), and then a steamed sticky rice cake dessert. But that's just because I'm a good eater. I've been tracking its uses since 2001 when a feature article appeared in IEEE Spectrum that year. I enjoy all of its aspects, from its mountaineering applications, to comet dust collection, to the way it reminds me of delicious things to eat. :P I'm curious about agricutural uses by just modifying the insulation properties to reduce antibiotic resistance in bovines. Would be great if the insulation absorbed the downwind smell of Bucky (my Nubian male goat) too!

I first heard of aerogel about six or seven years ago on a television program, and was fascinated by it--something that could be so light--almost as light as air--and yet be able to withstand so much heat. Absolutely amazing!

"Solid smoke"; I'd love to handle the stuff sometime just to see what it feels like.

I heard somewhere, though, that aerogel has been around a long time--since the 1930's, in fact. If so, that's even more amazing! I guess because it's expensive or difficult to manufacture it hasn't really become an object of interest until lately, because of advances in technology.

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How did you train the birds to ride on the goats? That sounds difficult.

I'm curious about agricutural uses by just modifying the insulation properties to reduce antibiotic resistance in bovines.

I missed this the first time - I don't at all understand what you mean here, can you elaborate?

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How did you train the birds to ride on the goats? That sounds difficult.
I'm curious about agricutural uses by just modifying the insulation properties to reduce antibiotic resistance in bovines.

I missed this the first time - I don't at all understand what you mean here, can you elaborate?

Both are very independent species that wouldn't normally cohabit (and tragopans also are solitary creatures), but tragopans get scared very easily and tend to stay in one spot, unmoving, for long periods of time. They learned that goats were safe to flap onto when getting away from human danger. I had to scare them down from the trees to look at them; I have other feathered eye-pleasers, but none of the others prefer to live amidst foliage like the tragopans. Their habit of staying motionless while on a moving object (like a tree branch in the wind) made learning to 'ride' pretty easy. I started scaring them onto the backs of goats because it's easier to see them there than on the ground, unlike the white and regular blue-green male peacocks I also have on my land. :P Soon the tragopans discovered there the food variety I provided as lures for the goats, so they just kept going for goatback rides even when they were not scared into doing so.

Purely a dream, but if a barn floor and walls was insulated with Aerogel, but a layer of pores facing inwards was impregnated with timed- and bacteria smell-sensitive release of antibacterial packets or beads, there could be a lesser need for massive preventative overdoses of antibiotics that are intended to prevent the spread of diseases transmitted by close proximity. Antibiotics in large preventative doses by both injection and feed that do not distinguish between bovine spatial relationships to each other in enclosed spaces are the norm.

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Purely a dream, but if a barn floor and walls was insulated with Aerogel, but a layer of pores facing inwards was impregnated with timed- and bacteria smell-sensitive release of antibacterial packets or beads, there could be a lesser need for massive preventative overdoses of antibiotics that are intended to prevent the spread of diseases transmitted by close proximity. Antibiotics in large preventative doses by both injection and feed that do not distinguish between bovine spatial relationships to each other in enclosed spaces are the norm.

Interesting ideas. Perhaps you should try patenting some of your ideas (not just these), there have certainly been much less innovative inventions that've been patented. As you probably know though, you musn't disclose them publicly prior to a submitting the patent.

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I think it would make for a great thermal and noise isolator, if it could be stabilized a little bit.

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