baletindomewen

Henna body art

61 posts in this topic

I don't know if this would be an objectivist art, but this is what I do. I've been doing this on myself for a few years, but I've learned a lot more about the art in the last year so I could start doing it for others. I've started a business doing henna body art and belly dance / Bollywood dance as live entertainment. I figured it was about time I make some money doing something I love...lol

My first attempt at bridal henna:

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Just a random composite of design elements:

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Me and my sister at a dance performance with henna on our hands and feet:

1179225900_l.jpg

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That's really, really great work!

I have always found Henna to be very visually appealing, and beautifully exotic when it suits the wearer.

I myself had wanted to get a little Henna design on my back, but couldn't find any place that I was confident about.

If I'm ever in town, I'll give you a call :P

~C~*

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Is that what the actual Henna plant looks like, or is it called Henna because of the color of the dye?

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Some of the girls in my family get this done for weddings. I think it looks really cool when it is done to mimic a bracelet or rings.

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Yes, all my henna is a pure, natural mix from fresh henna powder. There are a lot of artists out there who don't use pure henna and it can have disastrous results, from bad rashes to death. I don't consider myself much of an artist per se -- my sister is much better at it than I am -- but it's a lot of fun and much nicer than getting a painful permanent tattoo, in my opinion.

B. Royce, if you don't mind me asking, why revulsion?

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I've never been a fan of that sort of art either, because I think it takes away from a woman's beauty. Tattoos have never appealed to me on women either.

You and your sister are pretty, and everything you're wearing is nice, but for me the drawings on the body take away from the human body. To be honest with you, the design clashes with your skin. In effect, it tries to take over and be the center of attention, when I would think a woman would want her body to be more the center of attention. In contrast, your dresses are eye appealing, and show off your bodies.

I have a theory about that. Shiny earrings and jewelry pull your eyes to a girl, so that you can see her pretty face, hands, etc. Lips stick enhances her lips. A nice dress shows off her curves. Everything is about the girl. Tattoos and body designs, as a rule, appear to be more about the designs.

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Not necessarily. I've found that there are some colors to tattoos that can be quite nice with the girls skin tone.

Also, I don't think that it has to be all about the design. If it suits the girl, (meaning whatever design she chose reflects her particular style) and the proportions are right, again, it can be very complimentary.

I personally wouldn't get a tattoo, but I've seen girls who look great with one , because they can wear it. Same with baletindomewen and her sister. They can wear it.

~C~*

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Yes, all my henna is a pure, natural mix from fresh henna powder. There are a lot of artists out there who don't use pure henna and it can have disastrous results, from bad rashes to death. I don't consider myself much of an artist per se -- my sister is much better at it than I am -- but it's a lot of fun and much nicer than getting a painful permanent tattoo, in my opinion.

B. Royce, if you don't mind me asking, why revulsion?

I agree with Thales (post #7) in essence. When I first looked at the picture of the girls I saw their faces, which are pleasant enough. When my sight went down to their arms and hands it was as if I was looking at something totally alien, alien to the beauty of human arms and hands. My statement of revulsion was an immediate, sense of life response, not something thought out in order to create a certain effect. The designs were drawing my mind away from identifying and judging human qualities and potentials, and toward a design for its own sake, for which the arms and hands were merely a means. Unlike makeup, which, when best used, highlights character and romantic potential, this henna seems anti-human.

Now, we did have discussion on another thread about tattoo, in which the tentative conclusion was that it is a matter of personal taste. Here, at least, you have my honest personal opinion about henna.

One Forum member has PM'd me, telling me that my post was terrible behavior. I think he was trying to protect your "fragile" ego. Is it so fragile?

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I don't know if this would be an objectivist art, but this is what I do. I've been doing this on myself for a few years, but I've learned a lot more about the art in the last year so I could start doing it for others.

My first thought is that it's a nicely done geometric pattern - and that it's a good thing that it's a temporary application and not a permanent tattoo (which frankly I consider, for the most part, to be insane.)

Overall I don't think that such tattoos are an enhancement to a woman's appearance, though. You are attractive by yourself, in your clothing, and I tend to agree with the comments that it draws attention away from the woman to the patterns themselves. My reaction is not revulsion, but I don't think that Brian should be criticized for stating that it was his reaction; he is honestly stating a personal sense-of-life emotional reaction on an aesthetic issue that can readily be changed. (By contrast, in my opinion, it would be quite inappropriate for a man to state that the woman herself was ugly, even if it was true, unless she were behaving viciously. Such comments serve no useful purpose, and I think almost everyone understands that.)

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"Fragile" ego? Hmmm...

I've certainly never been good at taking criticism, but that's because my mother raised me to accept nothing less than perfection (in the sense that I deserved perfection simply because I am who I am, not because of any actual merit or ability or talent...talk about looter mentality). Without going into all the details, I'll just say that my mother and I are no longer on speaking terms, for this and many other reasons.

No, I perfectly understand that different people have differing views of body art. I've gotten such an array of responses from people, I can take them all in stride. The worst response I ever got was from an elderly woman who looked at my hands and said, "I just hate tattoos. They're the Devil's work. Here..." (she pulls a bible out of her purse) "...I'm a member of the Gideons and I'd like you to have this." It was all I could do to not laugh and tell her I'm atheist.

So no, my ego is not that fragile...or at least certainly not as fragile as it once was. I'm learning to be more accepting of criticism because, without my mother's influence, I've come to realize that criticism is an opportunity to learn, not a reason to become offended and get angry (though I still do that sometimes...it's hard to break 20 years of habit).

I appreciate your input. Henna is something I love, though, and I'm hoping to make a job out of it (anything to get me away from my current job that doesn't challenge me in any way...yet I'm still there...but that's another long story).

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"Fragile" ego? Hmmm...

I've certainly never been good at taking criticism, but that's because my mother raised me to accept nothing less than perfection (in the sense that I deserved perfection simply because I am who I am, not because of any actual merit or ability or talent...talk about looter mentality). Without going into all the details, I'll just say that my mother and I are no longer on speaking terms, for this and many other reasons.

No, I perfectly understand that different people have differing views of body art. I've gotten such an array of responses from people, I can take them all in stride. The worst response I ever got was from an elderly woman who looked at my hands and said, "I just hate tattoos. They're the Devil's work. Here..." (she pulls a bible out of her purse) "...I'm a member of the Gideons and I'd like you to have this." It was all I could do to not laugh and tell her I'm atheist.

So no, my ego is not that fragile...or at least certainly not as fragile as it once was. I'm learning to be more accepting of criticism because, without my mother's influence, I've come to realize that criticism is an opportunity to learn, not a reason to become offended and get angry (though I still do that sometimes...it's hard to break 20 years of habit).

I appreciate your input. Henna is something I love, though, and I'm hoping to make a job out of it (anything to get me away from my current job that doesn't challenge me in any way...yet I'm still there...but that's another long story).

Well, I'm glad you're not so weak! But I would like to ask you a question. You said in an earlier post that you want to do henna in order to get out of your current job, which is not a challenge. You also said that doing henna is fun. Is doing henna a challenge? If so, what is challenging about it?

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Not necessarily. I've found that there are some colors to tattoos that can be quite nice with the girls skin tone.

Also, I don't think that it has to be all about the design. If it suits the girl, (meaning whatever design she chose reflects her particular style) and the proportions are right, again, it can be very complimentary.

I think you're right, this is why I was careful to call it a "rule" and not a principle. I could see such art work being used to enhance a girl's curves, for instance. Hey, listen, I'm not trying to be insulting, I was just trying to explain things, since she wanted an explanation.

I hope that by providing the logic behind my position, I helped to clarify the matter. For the record, I don't find it “repulsive”, I just think it clashes with her body.

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I like the henna enhancements. I've always found that quite pretty, and I personally don't find that distracting. It does draw attention on some body parts (e.g., hands), and it works better when those are elegant to start with. In short, I think those look better on women with pretty feet and hands.

[quote name='B. Royce' date='Oct 15 2007, 07:00 PM' post='62270'One Forum member has PM'd me, telling me that my post was terrible behavior. I think he was trying to protect your "fragile" ego. Is it so fragile?

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Well said Joss :P

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I've always been slightly ambivalent about tattoos and body decoration (such as Henna), but only slightly; for the most part I, like I believe Thales and B. Royce might view it, find them to be a distraction from focus on the individual's body. On rare occasion, I have liked a selectively placed tattoo on a woman's body; but only on rare occasion. And frankly, to me, tattoos in general give a woman a visual element of sleaze, so, ultimately, it puts me off.

As far as body "art" (body decoration is a more appropriate phrase), again, it does not enhance a woman's body, for me; the focus is on the "art". I'd rather look at her.

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What is the fundamental difference between henna and jewelry? It would seem both are a form of body decoration. Both can even be done in gold or silver colours. In most cases (at least the way I've seen it in my family), henna is placed in areas like the fingers, wrists, feet, and forehead--places where Indian jewelry would appear. To me, if you're revulsed by henna you should be equally revulsed by jewelry.

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I like the henna enhancements. I've always found that quite pretty, and I personally don't find that distracting. It does draw attention on some body parts (e.g., hands), and it works better when those are elegant to start with. In short, I think those look better on women with pretty feet and hands.

I think it over powers the hands. The first one in particular I refer to. The one in the middle, just looking at the pattern, is nice. The pattern is well drawn, but I don't think it works with the leg. The final picture isn't too bad, but I still find it somewhat distracting.

Something I do appreciate is body painting, ala what was done in the 2006 Sports Illustrated Swimsuit issue.

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To be repulsed means to reject, rebuff or have a feeling of disgust. Disgust is defined as repugnant. Repugnant is defined as aversion. Aversion is defined as something decidedly disliked.

Now, I do not remember when it was made a law that you could not state that you had a repulsion/dislike for something. For you that like the Henna body marks, good for you. For those that dislike it, such as Brian F., good for him also. As long as you know why you like or dislike something, who cares what others think. To even know what feeling your having would most likely mean that your have probably integrated your values.

Also when someone puts their ideas, art or any other thing out there for other people to view they should not expect only critiques that are in favor. If that is what what some expect, I would offer keeping it to themselves.

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Now, I do not remember when it was made a law that you could not state that you had a repulsion/dislike for something.

Tact is certainly not a law, but something useful to use.

Also when someone puts their ideas, art or any other thing out there for other people to view they should not expect only critiques that are in favor. If that is what what some expect, I would offer keeping it to themselves.

"I'm repulsed" falls short of a critique by a long shot.

I do think it is reasonable to expect tactfulness from reasonable people.

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The word used was revulsion, defined in my dictionary as "a sudden violent feeling of disgust". This is not a neutral term.

And Ray, what I criticize isn't the opinion (B. Royce strongly dislike henna), but the method, and the rationale for using this method.

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First, I apologize for using the wrong word, I looked up revulsion and then went on to synonyms which repulse was one.

My dictionary has the same meaning that Joss wrote along with, a feeling of complete distaste or repugnance. So, we are again back to the other definitions I listed.

I would also agree with Duke, that on this type of forum one would expect a proper amount of tact. But, one does not expect to be lied to, especially on this forum.

I would also think, like myself, that most people on this forum have never even heard of Henna before nor seen it. So, a properly thought out response on something that you have never seen before is most likely not going to happen, instead you would give you automatic value judgement. I think Brian (B. Royce), gave his automatic value judgement to Henna. Could it have been done in a different way? Yes. But, I would guess he did it with what he was feeling and for someone that has taken the time to introspect, discriminate and understand which aspects of something they respond to or value in life, a short description can usually explain it.

An example on a similar subject would be tattoos. If I see a heavly tatooed woman walking around a mall (or anywhere), my first response is to turn away my line of sight, or to be repulsed. I do not question myself anymore on why I have done this. I trust my values, in which I have already done the introspecting, discriminating and understanding of what and why I value.

Finally, I do not mean to speak for Brian (B. Royce) I am only assuming that he might have done it the way I explained.

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First, I apologize for using the wrong word, I looked up revulsion and then went on to synonyms which repulse was one.

My dictionary has the same meaning that Joss wrote along with, a feeling of complete distaste or repugnance. So, we are again back to the other definitions I listed.

I would also agree with Duke, that on this type of forum one would expect a proper amount of tact. But, one does not expect to be lied to, especially on this forum.

I would also think, like myself, that most people on this forum have never even heard of Henna before nor seen it. So, a properly thought out response on something that you have never seen before is most likely not going to happen, instead you would give you automatic value judgement. I think Brian (B. Royce), gave his automatic value judgement to Henna. Could it have been done in a different way? Yes. But, I would guess he did it with what he was feeling and for someone that has taken the time to introspect, discriminate and understand which aspects of something they respond to or value in life, a short description can usually explain it.

An example on a similar subject would be tattoos. If I see a heavly tatooed woman walking around a mall (or anywhere), my first response is to turn away my line of sight, or to be repulsed. I do not question myself anymore on why I have done this. I trust my values, in which I have already done the introspecting, discriminating and understanding of what and why I value.

Finally, I do not mean to speak for Brian (B. Royce) I am only assuming that he might have done it the way I explained.

You are right, Ray. I was not personally attacking the young henna woman, merely responding to what was before my eyes. I have seen much jewelry in my time and seen how it can often enhance the beauty of a hand, an arm, a neck or an ear. All I saw with the henna was (as I saw it) a total hiding, as it were, of the hands, as if they were not what they were.

Others can see for themselves and express themselves. On my poetry thread I am used to receiving one-word or one-sentence expressions toward my poems. Sometimes it is simply "Delightful". I am perfectly comfortable with this. I do not question the responder's methodology. Nor would I if the response was negative. If the lovers of henna wish to praise the henna and its creator presented on this thread they should do so.

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I would also think, like myself, that most people on this forum have never even heard of Henna before nor seen it. So, a properly thought out response on something that you have never seen before is most likely not going to happen, instead you would give you automatic value judgement. I think Brian (B. Royce), gave his automatic value judgement to Henna.

It's one thing to have an involuntary shudder when you see something ugly unexpectedly. It's another to take the time to hit "Reply", wright an answer carefully enough to have proper grammar and spelling, hit "enter" and post - this is a relatively slow, completely controlled, thought through reaction. Different standards of custom & decency (should) apply.

On my poetry thread I am used to receiving one-word or one-sentence expressions toward my poems. Sometimes it is simply "Delightful". I am perfectly comfortable with this. I do not question the responder's methodology. Nor would I if the response was negative.

Surely you would be puzzled and upset if someone took the time to enter a few words of comments about something you are passionate about, and those were "I find this poem revolting". You would wonder why, you would ask yourself why the poster felt the need to express themselves so forcefully. You would wonder if it is the theme, the medium, the choice of words. At best, you would completely discount the post as being devoid of any useful information to you or other readers, and rightly wonder why the poster took the time to write it, and what were their motives. In short, you would react as you would to any rude comment. At best, they're a waste of everyone's time, at worst they are hurtful.

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