Carlos

Christian Private Schools

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I want to have a career as a teacher and ideally would work for a private school. However, in this particular neck of the woods (Texas) the vast majority of the private schools I've looked up are Christian.

Are Christian Private Schools really that overtly religious? Or is it completely plausible for someone like me (an atheist) to have a happy career teaching Physics at one?

I've done a decent amount of reading on the internet pertaining to a career as a Physics high school teacher, and the single overwhelming voice I hear is "For god's sakes don't teach at a public school!". Also, for personal principled reasons I'd prefer to teach at a private school (also not to mention all the extra "green" I would get).

Any information or advice will be greatly appreciated!

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Why do you limit yourself to Texas?

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Speaking for myself, though he might relate-I honestly don't want to go anywhere else but Texas. Maybe a few other places in the South-but I'd rather stay safe in Texas than suffer in the North.

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What do you mean "suffer in the North?"

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Every single peron I have spoken to who lives in the North, has lived in the North, or has been in the North, found it to be a place full of people who were: unfriendly, liberal, un-American, depressed, pessimistic people. I also used to work for a company (Comcast) and dealt with only the North East on the telephone-it was a shock to me when I would speak to somebody with a "pep" in their voice, somebody who was generally nice or benevolent.

In opposition to that, the South (especially Texas), is very benevolent, life-loving, optimistic, pro-American, conservative, etc. It's normal to walk down the streets and have your neighbors wave to you with a smile, asking how you are doing.

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Every single peron I have spoken to who lives in the North, has lived in the North, or has been in the North, found it to be a place full of people who were: unfriendly, liberal, un-American, depressed, pessimistic people. I also used to work for a company (Comcast) and dealt with only the North East on the telephone-it was a shock to me when I would speak to somebody with a "pep" in their voice, somebody who was generally nice or benevolent.

In opposition to that, the South (especially Texas), is very benevolent, life-loving, optimistic, pro-American, conservative, etc. It's normal to walk down the streets and have your neighbors wave to you with a smile, asking how you are doing.

I would offer that you expand your contact with people from the north. I do agree that there are the types of people that you mention in the north but they are everywhere. They also are not the only type of people in the north.

On a side note. I would offer that you do not let the bad determine what you do. I can understand you wanting to stay where you enjoy being. What I am saying is that if you enjoyed a city in the north but it seemed to be full of unfriendly people, to not let them determine where you choose to live. You live someplace or go and do what you want because of the value you intend on achieving. To a certain exten do not allow the evil to have power over you choices.

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They also are not the only type of people in the north.

In my experience, they are the predominant kind. Big cities, especially New York City, are particularly bad examples of this phenomenon. The more out into the country you go, let's say up-state New York or out in New Hampshire, the less cynical and depressing people get; but they're at the same time still not as concertedly pro-American as Texas seems to be, or in any way productive. Texas seems to be the last state of the union that still joins great patriotism, that profound sense of emotional contentedness, with bright and vigorous yankee ingenuity.

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I would offer that you expand your contact with people from the north. I do agree that there are the types of people that you mention in the north but they are everywhere. They also are not the only type of people in the north.

On a side note. I would offer that you do not let the bad determine what you do. I can understand you wanting to stay where you enjoy being. What I am saying is that if you enjoyed a city in the north but it seemed to be full of unfriendly people, to not let them determine where you choose to live. You live someplace or go and do what you want because of the value you intend on achieving. To a certain exten do not allow the evil to have power over you choices.

I agree.

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Well but here's the thing Ray.

I have two choices in my life: Law or the University.

In both fields, there are plentiful resources in Texas (a wonderful State government for Constitutional Law, and some of the best Universities in the world).

Might I get payed more living in the North, teaching at...say...NYU or Michigan or Northwestern? Yes. But would I enjoy my life as much? By no means.

I would rather take the pay cut and live amongst people with similar values, where whole blocks have the American flag waving...at all times, than live up North. Are there good people up there, and bad people down here? Of course! The Forum is proof that there is an Objectivist living in Turkey! But will I be able to walk my dog up north and get a wave and a smile from almost every person? Probably not.

I would be willing to start a new thread on it, but it is my firm belief that Texas is the last bastion of what is true in America left-from big corporations and leading edge technology, down to your simple hard working, middle classed individual-and I have made it my personal mission never to leave Texas, but instead to stay in this Oasis, defending it and spreading it to the rest of the "backwards" states.

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Also, for personal principled reasons I'd prefer to teach at a private school (also not to mention all the extra "green" I would get).

Is it true that you earn more at private schools? I've been led to believe on more than one occasion that you earn less at private schools. Perhaps the teaching level has something to do with it? Gradeschool vs. college level, for example?

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Also, for personal principled reasons I'd prefer to teach at a private school (also not to mention all the extra "green" I would get).

Is it true that you earn more at private schools? I've been led to believe on more than one occasion that you earn less at private schools. Perhaps the teaching level has something to do with it? Gradeschool vs. college level, for example?

I will have a Master's in Physics, and I've read that Private Schools offer great salaries to individuals with credentials like that, much better than what could be expected from a Public School.

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Also, for personal principled reasons I'd prefer to teach at a private school (also not to mention all the extra "green" I would get).

Is it true that you earn more at private schools? I've been led to believe on more than one occasion that you earn less at private schools. Perhaps the teaching level has something to do with it? Gradeschool vs. college level, for example?

I will have a Master's in Physics, and I've read that Private Schools offer great salaries to individuals with credentials like that, much better than what could be expected from a Public School.

Why do you not call or e-mail Lisa VanDamme or someone from the LePort school? Even if you did not want to leave where you are, they could probably give you some worthy insight into your situation.

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Jason, if you read my response again you will see that I acknowledged your value of Texas and what you think it has to offer.

I spent from 1980 until 1987 living just outside Buffalo, New York and I can tell you that people there did wave and say hello. As a matter of fact I graduated from a school that had only 126 people in the class. I went to a school that had a lake front and a harbor where most of the surrounding kids went for activities. People had flags poles in their front yards, post boxes that looked like Marines standing at attention and much more. My closet neighbor to my north was over a mile away and my parents owned almost 39 acres with a 5 acre pond and a lot of land to ride horses and play.

If you want to stay where you are at, that is fine as it is your choice. I am trying to point out that there are other places that can offer other values as well, if you look. Also, I would like to remind you that you and Jordan are the one's that just a few weeks ago said that you were being over-run, not me.

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In opposition to that, the South (especially Texas), is very benevolent, life-loving, optimistic, pro-American, conservative, etc. It's normal to walk down the streets and have your neighbors wave to you with a smile, asking how you are doing.

Hmm, that's funny, I've been to most parts of this country, and to New Zealand, Singapore, England, and Switzerland, and so far Texas seems to be the *un*friendliest place of them all, generally. So much so that I was pretty amused when Jim Rogers, the retired multimillionaire who was the first man to ride around the planet strictly on a motorcycle (airlifted across oceans of course), was at the end of his trip in Texas. The final pic in his book (Investment Biker) was their bikes (he and his then-gf's) in front of a "Welcome to friendly Texas" sign, with a caption:

"Would we really make it? I was sad the trip was nearing an end, but exhilarated that we were triumphant. As we took this photo, a friendly Texas driver deliberately ran over my bike."

This, after they and their bikes survived riding across practically every continent on earth: through monster thunderstorms with baseball sized hail in Siberia, riding across the Sahara on sand tires, through central African hell, and up from the southern tip of South America all the way up through Mexico.

No doubt just a coincidence. :lol:

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Hmm, that's funny, I've been to most parts of this country, and to New Zealand, Singapore, England, and Switzerland, and so far Texas seems to be the *un*friendliest place of them all, generally.
Where have you been in Texas?
"Would we really make it? I was sad the trip was nearing an end, but exhilarated that we were triumphant. As we took this photo, a friendly Texas driver deliberately ran over my bike."

I suspect it was a driver from Oklahoma :lol:

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I suspect it was a driver from Oklahoma :lol:

While I'm making fun of Oklahoma, here's this.

(From the TV Show "King of the Hill", in an episode where Hank and his friends are discussing getting personalized license plates)

HANK: I'm pretty sure the license people are gonna need to see a birth certificate. Otherwise you'd have a bunch of Oklahomans trying to get Native Texan license plates.

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Just to put in a few good words from the North :lol:

Being a stylist, I literally come into contact with hundreds of people a month, and get to speak with them for a good chunk of time.

I would say that 3/4 of those people are very friendly good-natured people.

Yes, you get the sour one once in a while, but it is like that everywhere.

When I visit Texas, which is quite often, I've noticed that yes, people are generally friendly, but I've also noticed that in Canada, Boston and Atlanta, Georgia.

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Here's another great few lines from the same episode:

(Hank has discovered he was actually born in New York City, not Texas)

PEGGY: Maybe you should have opened your eyes and then your Bible, Hank. "Red and yellow, black and white, we are all precious in His sight."

HANK: Nothing in there about New York.

PEGGY: Well, Sodom is in there, Hank, and Gomorrah. And they are New York as all get-out.

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I have been all across the Eastern seaboard. Though outside of cities people are still amiable and benevolent, they cannot be said to be aggressively and assertively pro-American. Only the South and the mid-West remain as the vocal pro-American section of the country. It is by no means an accident of statistics that 80% of Marines are said to come from Texas.

The only men who aggressively love and idolize America are the Cubans, in Florida; they will talk the ear off any Puerto-Rican or Mexican they can get their hands on. But aside from them the East is silent. Whatever benevolence it maintains is fragmentary, and diffident, and inescapably receding more and more each day.

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I want to have a career as a teacher and ideally would work for a private school. However, in this particular neck of the woods (Texas) the vast majority of the private schools I've looked up are Christian.

Are Christian Private Schools really that overtly religious? Or is it completely plausible for someone like me (an atheist) to have a happy career teaching Physics at one?

I've done a decent amount of reading on the internet pertaining to a career as a Physics high school teacher, and the single overwhelming voice I hear is "For god's sakes don't teach at a public school!". Also, for personal principled reasons I'd prefer to teach at a private school (also not to mention all the extra "green" I would get).

Any information or advice will be greatly appreciated!

The teaching environment would depend on how serious the school is about learning versus religion, but in Texas that could pertain to either private or public schools. Keep in mind what happened to John Lewis at Ashland University where he was taken off guard by religious zealots who felt threatened by him, to the amazement of other more secular professors who hadn't taken the religion serously either. It could depend on how much you speak out in addition to teaching straight physics, especially if you contrast science with religion in your teaching, let alone elsewhere.

You should also check out the schools' requirements for the curriculum and text books you teach -- if science courses at some school would require creationism or intelligent design you would of course be in trouble. Even though your specialty is physics, you may very well be asked to teach other science courses, which could bring you into directly into the realm of biology and evolution.

If all those issues seem to be ok at some school, then your main concern would become more the intellectual environment around you rather than what you teach.

As for public vs. private, it would depend on the quality of the school. There are some very good public schools in specific locations, but again, check the curriculum and text books required -- this time watching out for viroism, as well as -- in Texas -- the religion.

In general, public schools are more prone to discipline problems where you could spend more time overseeing an ill-behaved zoo than teaching. As for pay, private schools have a reputation for paying less, but that can vary. Public schools tend to follow union scales with low starting salaries and then after many years paying above average salaries reqardless of competence. A higher than average starting salary may be because of discpline problems making the job unattractive to serious teachers.

These are all things you can ask about at specific schools you investigate. If the initial answers seem ok, probe more by talking to people who have been teaching there awhile.

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I want to have a career as a teacher and ideally would work for a private school. However, in this particular neck of the woods (Texas) the vast majority of the private schools I've looked up are Christian.

Are Christian Private Schools really that overtly religious? Or is it completely plausible for someone like me (an atheist) to have a happy career teaching Physics at one?

I've done a decent amount of reading on the internet pertaining to a career as a Physics high school teacher, and the single overwhelming voice I hear is "For god's sakes don't teach at a public school!". Also, for personal principled reasons I'd prefer to teach at a private school (also not to mention all the extra "green" I would get).

Any information or advice will be greatly appreciated!

Here's how they teach "literature" at one Christian school in California:

<<Dickinson's year at Mount Holyoke Female Seminary further shaped her "religious" views. During her stay at the school, she learned of Christ but wrote of her inability to make a decision for Him. She could not settle "the one thing needful." A thorough study of Dickinson's works indicates that she never did make that needful decision. Several of her poems show a presumptuous attitude concerning her eternal destiny and a veiled disrespect for authority in general. Throughout her life she viewed salvation as a gamble, not a certainty. Although she did view the Bible as a source of poetic inspiration, she never accepted it as an inerrant guide to life.>>

I hate to think how they teach physics there.

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Are Christian Private Schools really that overtly religious?

Some are and some aren't.

Or is it completely plausible for someone like me (an atheist) to have a happy career teaching Physics at one?

Maybe, depending on the school.

For some leads to the good schools, contact ARI and find out which private schools in your area have the most entries in their essay contests.

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I would recommend not teaching at a catholic school.

Having gone to catholic schools for k-12 (thank god not in college), I can tell you that while the quality of my education was good (ironically, except for science, most especially chemistry and physics) catholic schools even at the high school level and religious nonsense permeates everything. Not to mention, catholic school teachers get paid less than public school teachers normally. In my opinion, aside from basic education (which they do actually do fairly well by today's standards), catholic schools are institutions designed to teach kids how to stop being an individual.

While I imagine you could have a fulfilling, successful career inside the classroom, I think it is likely you would find the work environment unbearable (mostly extremely religious coworkers, masses, seeing bright young minds indoctrinated with irrationality).

12 years of catholic schools has convinced me beyond a doubt that if I ever have kids they will only go to a catholic school if it's a university they choose to go to on a scholarship or pay for themselves.

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