Charles T.

. . . Atlas Shrugged is most downloaded at Audible

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I was just looking around at Audible.com and noticed that in the "Classics" sub-category of fiction, AS is the number one download (and Fountainhead is number three).

I looked around a little but could not find any info regarding how long it has been ranked there.

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I was just looking around at Audible.com and noticed that in the "Classics" sub-category of fiction, AS is the number one download (and Fountainhead is number three).

I looked around a little but could not find any info regarding how long it has been ranked there.

Atlas has been #1 in Classics ever since the audiobook was listed by Audible.com at least five years ago.

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Atlas has been #1 in Classics ever since the audiobook was listed by Audible.com at least five years ago.

:(

Glad to hear it. Thanks for the info. Know anything about The Fountainhead's rank over the years? I would guess it's pretty consistent, too.

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Atlas has been #1 in Classics ever since the audiobook was listed by Audible.com at least five years ago.

:(

Glad to hear it. Thanks for the info. Know anything about The Fountainhead's rank over the years? I would guess it's pretty consistent, too.

The Fountainhead has always been in the Top 5 and usually in the Top 3.

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Has there been a reported difference in understanding Objectivism when it is presented (to a person who has never been exposed to Objectivism) auditorily or visually? Would it not be the case that there would be a difference? That is not to say that AS and TF could not also be auditorily enjoyed as stories on a simpler level.

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Has there been a reported difference in understanding Objectivism when it is presented (to a person who has never been exposed to Objectivism) auditorily or visually? Would it not be the case that there would be a difference? That is not to say that AS and TF could not also be auditorily enjoyed as stories on a simpler level.

My thoughts on the subject would be that it has to do with time or laziness. A lot of people today spend a lot of time in their cars which makes it difficult to read a lot, but they can listen to books on MP3 players and other similar stuff. A lot of people are also lazy and do not want to read a book as large as FH or AS so they get the audible version. Again, just my thoughts.

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My thoughts on the subject would be that it has to do with time or laziness. A lot of people today spend a lot of time in their cars which makes it difficult to read a lot, but they can listen to books on MP3 players and other similar stuff. A lot of people are also lazy and do not want to read a book as large as FH or AS so they get the audible version. Again, just my thoughts.

A third possibility is that modern education has crippled their ability to read, and they're demotivated by the size of the books yet are curious about them.

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My thoughts on the subject would be that it has to do with time or laziness. A lot of people today spend a lot of time in their cars which makes it difficult to read a lot, but they can listen to books on MP3 players and other similar stuff. A lot of people are also lazy and do not want to read a book as large as FH or AS so they get the audible version. Again, just my thoughts.

I don't doubt this a large consumer subset of audible products in general, though one must not discount the blind or otherwise vision-restricted population. I'm not terribly concerned with these consumers of audible Objectivist products. However, I am interested in how an audible product may be made interactive for persons who are auditory learners as opposed to visual learners. I think there is a cutoff, upper maximum threshold slant that could be addressed through technology for persons accustomed to learning auditorily. Visually reading a(ny) sentence in a physically-held book will allow close and time delimited analysis for maximum mental cross-filing of words that have specific conceptual meanings presented so that the specific meanings have, in visual form, the mental equivalent of concretes. I wonder if an audible reading of AS or TF could come close to the visual derivation by allowing the listener to request the recording to pause, and request an audible definition of any particular word with an example, and request a repeat if desired. I assume this is possible with today though I don't know anything about how it would work technically. The market for this sort of recording is currently very small, but it would make me happy if ARI had a patent-happy bunch creating such things. That doesn't prevent someone outside ARI from creating, patenting and marketing a good product, of course.

I think there is potential for a small market for an audible Objectivist game for car drives or rides. A "who said this?" or "complete the quote" or an Objectivist "Jeopardy". I better stop here. I just visualized playing Objectivist Jeopardy in OR prep and that's just not right - but it would be a lot of fun.

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I wonder if an audible reading of AS or TF could come close to the visual derivation by allowing the listener to request the recording to pause, and request an audible definition of any particular word with an example, and request a repeat if desired. I assume this is possible with today though I don't know anything about how it would work technically. The market for this sort of recording is currently very small, but it would make me happy if ARI had a patent-happy bunch creating such things. That doesn't prevent someone outside ARI from creating, patenting and marketing a good product, of course.

In a related note: Amazon.com has just released a new e-book device, the "Kindle", which does allow the reader to instantly look up the meaning of any word on the screen. The device is also an mp3 player and compatible with Audible.com recordings, though the dictionary function does not interact with audio-books, only printed words on its screen. But the listener could easily pause the recording and use the dictionary to look up a word on the spot.

It's an interesting device, which also makes available subscriptions to some magazines, newspapers, and blogs. It connects to its download server via a cellphone network (no subscription fees involved for that), it is not dependent upon wi-fi or computer connections. It's current price is $400, which seems a bit high to me.

Amazon Kindle

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AS is the number one download? That is wonderful.

The Amazon Kindle seems like a really cool device. If it wasn't so expensive, I'd get one and stop buying paper copies of anything available digitally. But I think $400 is too high. I wonder if they will ultimately come to that conclusion, and go to the free-razor-to-sell-blades, or free-printer-to-sell-ink-cartridges business model! (disclaimer: I own AMZN stock :D )

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My thoughts on the subject would be that it has to do with time or laziness.

I "read" about 30 books per year, 10-15 of them by listening to the audiobook. It is definitely laziness; I listen while I work out on the elliptical machine or lift weights. :D

Many libraries carry a wide variety of audiobooks, especially new, popular books, such as God is not Great, Freakonomics, The Age of Turbulence: Adventures in a New World, all of which, I have "read" in the last few months.

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I live in Southern California and often spend several hours a day in my car. I listen to a lot of audiobooks and that makes my drive, particularly in heavy trafic, much more pleasant and educational. I can backspace my cassette player and recently got a new little MP3 player, the Sandisk Sansa Express, that also allows me to easily backspace a paragraph or so when I want to.

How does listening to a book compare to reading it? It depends on the reader. I found the unabridged Atlas Shrugged from Books on Tape to be unbearable. Blackstone Audio's version was OK, but not great. Blackstone's We the Living was outstanding thanks to the reader, Mary Woods, who brought a depth of understanding to the text that I had missed just reading the book.

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I will have to look into Blackstone's audio version of We the Living; I could possibly entertain myself with it on the journey to Berlin I will be making in October.

Thank you for pointing it out.

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It has been said that anything which is learned by being read aloud to the student is remembered best. Then again, I believe we all have different strengths when it comes to our senses. Some of us seem to respond best when using sight, some with sound.

I love both books and audio books. Generally though, I much prefer to read to myself..and if necessary, read some of it aloud to myself in order to fully comprehend it.

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