Go 4 TLI

Top Five Most Beautiful Cars

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A very pretty 275 GTB. It reminds me of my RX7 which I always loved for it's clean lines. (It avoided fender curves by using pop-up lights.)

http://www.flickr.co...157600978691278

Those were fun cars! I liked that first generation and the last, the last being a bit too clever with its sequential twin turbo tech (40ft+ of vacuum hose just to make that thing work. Mechanics didn't know where to begin if you pulled in with any issue. But when it worked right it was one of the great drives.)

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pretty

That one is a 1965, I think. A carbureted V12 in those days . . . 8-12mpg I would think, depending on where and how you drive it.

Definitely an auto for the Rich and Famous.

ruveyn

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pretty

That one is a 1965, I think. A carbureted V12 in those days . . . 8-12mpg I would think, depending on where and how you drive it.

Definitely an auto for the Rich and Famous.

ruveyn

Or for more average folks who love this particular model enough to make the necessary choices.

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What is amazing is that many family sedans today would outperform this classic. Everyone can drive with yesterday's super car performance, but the blandness and commonness don't make it as much fun. Yesterday's cars were not built to throw away, and plastic was rare. I don't know why I feel plastic, despite it's advantages, has no appeal in aesthetics.

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What is amazing is that many family sedans today would outperform this classic. Everyone can drive with yesterday's super car performance, but the blandness and commonness don't make it as much fun. Yesterday's cars were not built to throw away, and plastic was rare. I don't know why I feel plastic, despite it's advantages, has no appeal in aesthetics.

Apparently chasis strength and power to weight ratio are not your primary concern.

De gustabus non disputandem est. (Latin for there is no point arguing about matters of taste).

ruveyn

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What is amazing is that many family sedans today would outperform this classic. Everyone can drive with yesterday's super car performance, but the blandness and commonness don't make it as much fun. Yesterday's cars were not built to throw away, and plastic was rare. I don't know why I feel plastic, despite it's advantages, has no appeal in aesthetics.

The industry has been lazy and cheap. Everyone hates the look of plastic, especially when it's given that faux leather grain. While it can't be helped in many cases, there's no reason why most middle class cars can't be finished with better materials (several years ago, I read that a full leather interior for a mainstream Ford cost the company ~$200. If we demand it they'll deliver, skipping the $2-4K surcharge.)

As for power to weight: nothing the industry can do undoes the impact of legislation in this regard. Irrational safety standards coupled to arbitrary and expensive mpg and Emissions requirements aren't helping. (It's estimated that the lightening of passenger cars sold in the US claims 4-6K lives a year. How do we reconcile that fact with the ban of soda containers over 16oz in the name of public health?)

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I think that regulation is largely to blame for the blandness. All the cars have to fit such narrow standards that they end up looking very similar.

My dad used to have a vintage Mercedes Benz (early 50's 220). It was lovely, but you had to constantly polish the chromes and treat the leather. That was a pain in the neck.

But then again, that was the luxury side of things. On the other side of the spectrum you had things like the original VV beetle and the French 2CV - horrible cars.

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I should think that the Ultimate Strong Auto would be made of carbon fiber material which is stronger than steel and much lighter. With the right weave carbon fiber material, especially nano-filament would have both tensile and compressive strength. Imagine a car of only a few hundred pounds exceeding the string of a ton of steel! the mind boggles.

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On the other side of the spectrum you had things like the original VV beetle and the French 2CV - horrible cars.

The advantage of the old beetles was that they were cheap, relatively easy to repair yourself, and reasonably fun to drive (and easy to park) -- at least locally if not on highways -- even if the heater didn't work for cold weather. I once experienced all of that with a used '69 beetle -- including replacing the engine myself outside in the driveway in the middle of January, which was the last straw that convinced me to buy a more modern and reliable new car.

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I should think that the Ultimate Strong Auto would be made of carbon fiber material which is stronger than steel and much lighter. With the right weave carbon fiber material, especially nano-filament would have both tensile and compressive strength. Imagine a car of only a few hundred pounds exceeding the string of a ton of steel! the mind boggles.

I'm not sure about a few hundred, but around 1000lbs sounds right.

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I should think that the Ultimate Strong Auto would be made of carbon fiber material which is stronger than steel and much lighter. With the right weave carbon fiber material, especially nano-filament would have both tensile and compressive strength. Imagine a car of only a few hundred pounds exceeding the string of a ton of steel! the mind boggles.

I'm not sure about a few hundred, but around 1000lbs sounds right.

Right. The engine and tires will be the heaviest parts.

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