bborg

Criminal Justice

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Hey, bborg (Others may also be interested):

There are tons of good books on forensics, but I bought this one off the bargain table at Barnes & Noble and I found it to be a good, easy-reading overview (lotsa pictures). It doesn't go deep, it just covers the field:

Crime Investigation: The Ultimate Guide to Forensic Science by John D. Wright

Parragon Books, 2007, ISBN: 978-1-4054-9333-8 What's interesting is that it's available on B&N, but not Amazon, and it's not that easy to find otherwise in the US or the UK. It must be a special buy by B & N. But it's ca. $12.95 on the website, what I paid in the store. Maybe you could find it in your local B & N and check it out there.

Anyway, I liked it.

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Hey, bborg (Others may also be interested):

There are tons of good books on forensics, but I bought this one off the bargain table at Barnes & Noble and I found it to be a good, easy-reading overview (lotsa pictures). It doesn't go deep, it just covers the field:

Crime Investigation: The Ultimate Guide to Forensic Science by John D. Wright

Parragon Books, 2007, ISBN: 978-1-4054-9333-8 What's interesting is that it's available on B&N, but not Amazon, and it's not that easy to find otherwise in the US or the UK. It must be a special buy by B & N. But it's ca. $12.95 on the website, what I paid in the store. Maybe you could find it in your local B & N and check it out there.

Anyway, I liked it.

That's perfect for the level I'm at now, and I happen to have a gift card for B&N. :) Thanks!

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Update: I’ve discovered that there’s a certification I can work toward in addition to getting my Masters. It may even be possible to get certified before I’m awarded the degree so I can start applying for jobs sooner (I doubt it though). The test would be given by the International Association of Law Enforcement Intelligence Analysts (IALEIA). I noticed their training was mentioned on a Phoenix job application as something that could be used in the place of up to 1 year of experience. Wikipedia claims that IALEIA is the “largest organization of its kind in the world”.

They list the books the test is based off of, which includes:

Intelligence 2000: Revising the Basic Elements

Applications in Criminal Analysis: A Sourcebook

The Psychology of Intelligence Analysis

A Guide to the Financial Analysis of Personal and Corporate Bank Records

Strategic Intelligence: A Handbook for Practitioners, Managers and Users

Crime Analysis: From First Report to Final Arrest

As these books look like things I should read anyway if I am to enter the field, I thought there’s no harm in ordering a few. One of them, The Psychology of Intelligence Analysis is even downloadable from the CIA website.

I can’t get certified now, because I have to be a member to take the test and that means I either have to be a full-time student or have “academic achievements” related to the field. I read this as meaning a degree, but I’m wondering if they’ll let me apply when I get near my graduation.

So the plan is, I work these books into my normal studies and plan to have both a Masters in Criminal Justice and be a Certified Intelligence Analyst with this group by the end of ‘09. I’m hoping that will make me attractive enough to be taken seriously as an applicant.

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So the plan is, I work these books into my normal studies and plan to have both a Masters in Criminal Justice and be a Certified Intelligence Analyst with this group by the end of ‘09. I’m hoping that will make me attractive enough to be taken seriously as an applicant.

It sounds like a good plan to me. All the best with it.

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Well, tomorrow begins life as a grad student! I have to finish and hand in my final project for the current class and then I will have completed Juvenile Delinquency and Research Methods, the two prereqs for the Masters degree. And when I say tomorrow, I mean class begins tomorrow!

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Well, tomorrow begins life as a grad student! I have to finish and hand in my final project for the current class and then I will have completed Juvenile Delinquency and Research Methods, the two prereqs for the Masters degree. And when I say tomorrow, I mean class begins tomorrow!

Fantastic! Hope it goes well for you!

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Well, tomorrow begins life as a grad student! I have to finish and hand in my final project for the current class and then I will have completed Juvenile Delinquency and Research Methods, the two prereqs for the Masters degree. And when I say tomorrow, I mean class begins tomorrow!

Congrats, man!

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Thanks! It’s very exciting. :D

When you see that interesting, serious, intelligent looking gal across the classroom, try striking up a conversation with her later. You might be surprised.

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Well, tomorrow begins life as a grad student! I have to finish and hand in my final project for the current class and then I will have completed Juvenile Delinquency and Research Methods, the two prereqs for the Masters degree. And when I say tomorrow, I mean class begins tomorrow!

Onward and upward!

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When you see that interesting, serious, intelligent looking gal across the classroom, try striking up a conversation with her later. You might be surprised.

They're online classes, so alas there's nothing to see.

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Well, tomorrow begins life as a grad student! I have to finish and hand in my final project for the current class and then I will have completed Juvenile Delinquency and Research Methods, the two prereqs for the Masters degree. And when I say tomorrow, I mean class begins tomorrow!
Wow! That's terrific, Bryson! Have a great time. And I'm glad you're done with your juvenile delinquency... I'm sure your parents will be relieved.

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Well, tomorrow begins life as a grad student! I have to finish and hand in my final project for the current class and then I will have completed Juvenile Delinquency and Research Methods, the two prereqs for the Masters degree. And when I say tomorrow, I mean class begins tomorrow!
Wishing you all the best in your new path!

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When you see that interesting, serious, intelligent looking gal across the classroom, try striking up a conversation with her later. You might be surprised.

They're online classes, so alas there's nothing to see.

Congratulations, Bryson. Since your classes are on line than I recommend spending your time in internet cafes or other locations that you can access the internet. Have fun and good luck with your new pursuit.

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Congratulations, Bryson. Since your classes are on line than I recommend spending your time in internet cafes or other locations that you can access the internet. Have fun and good luck with your new pursuit.

I like that idea, I'll have to scout one out. :D

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Congratulations, Bryson. Since your classes are on line than I recommend spending your time in internet cafes or other locations that you can access the internet. Have fun and good luck with your new pursuit.

I like that idea, I'll have to scout one out. :D

A friend of mine has the iPhone and he showed me a feature where he types in his location and then types in coffee shop. A screen popped up and showed all the coffee shops within a five mile radius of his location. I thought that was pretty slick. Since you are also looking into MP3 players that search feature on the iPhone might be something you would be interested in. Let the search begin. :D

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I’m beginning to get an idea of the major conflicts in the field, which is really the only reason it hasn’t been completely swallowed by Kant. You do get a lot of his influence whenever you talk theory. It is very popular to want to attribute views on crime to a subjective “worldview” conditioned by any number of things. I got a good amount of that in my first course, and the two books assigned for my current class argue that no worldview is “true”, that reality is not fixed but depends on the observer, and we should learn to switch between different “perspectives”. I continue to see perspective described as a “lens” or “filter”. One author compares this to a pair of those toy glasses with many, different colored lenses. He argues that we can even combine the lenses, despite the fact that these “lenses” are often completely incompatible. You have the rational school, which holds crime is a product of individual choices, and you have the Marxist school that laws are by their nature forms of oppression designed to keep the ruling class in power. As you can guess, Kuhn is a favorite among many authors, because his views allow them to juggle these “perspectives” without judging them.

However, in my previous class on research methods it was clear that you also have a very healthy, objective community concerned with the validity of measurements and making accurate inferences from those measurements. One of the last chapters in my text was on evaluation research, discussing how policies must be tested to see if 1) they are implemented as designed, and 2) they produce the intended effect. In other words, this is a community that believes we can understand reality! The theories can be rationalistic and subjectivist, and it may be that most policies are driven by irrational theories. However the fact that you have rational standards for testing and validating those theories against reality means that there is a lot of resistance in the field, both implicit and explicit.

I was very impressed with The Psychology of Intelligence Analysis, the book as part of the reading list for the certification I mentioned earlier. I’m sure that there is variation I’m not aware of, but this book was written for the CIA at their request, suggesting that the views have wide acceptance. Intelligence analysis, like research, is empirically driven and not poisoned by many of the bad ideas embraced by academics and politicians.

Also, you have huge popular debates on crime. This is something everyone has an opinion on, because everyone has some level of experience with the criminal justice system. Try as they might, theorists cannot convince people to believe that which contradicts their own experience. I think most people don’t want to hear that the murderer is a victim of society that should be pitied and “rehabilitated”. They want him to pay! People don’t want to hear that laws are a tool of oppression. Laws are what keep them safe! Most people will not accept moral ambivalence when it comes to safeguarding their lives and the lives of their loved ones.

Of course, without good ideas, all that struggling will be for naught. But now I’m here. :)

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[...]

I was very impressed with The Psychology of Intelligence Analysis, the book as part of the reading list for the certification I mentioned earlier. I’m sure that there is variation I’m not aware of, but this book was written for the CIA at their request, suggesting that the views have wide acceptance. Intelligence analysis, like research, is empirically driven and not poisoned by many of the bad ideas embraced by academics and politicians.

Chapter 12 was good, but I read the book in relation to heuristics analyses and asylum claims. Are you able to itemize the other books or reading materials on the reading list which are not developed by the course provider?

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Chapter 12 was good, but I read the book in relation to heuristics analyses and asylum claims. Are you able to itemize the other books or reading materials on the reading list which are not developed by the course provider?

If you're curious, here is the reading over the entire program, organized by course name. Also, earlier I listed the books I found on the reading list of the board cert (which included Psyc of Int Analysis).

Criminal Justice Research

Title: Research Methods for Criminal Justice and Criminology

Author: Michael G. Maxfield, Earl R. Babbie

Juvenile Delinquency

Title: Juvenile Delinquency

Author: Clemens A. Bartollas

Foundations of Criminal Justice

Title: Mythology of Crime and Criminal Justice

Author: Victor E. Kappeler, Gary W. Potter

Title: Theorizing Criminal Justice: Eight Essential Orientations

Author: Peter B. B. Kraska

Advanced Techniques in Basic and Applied Research in Criminal Justice

Title: Practice of Social Research

Author: Babbie, Earl R.

Title: Social Science Research

Author: Lomand

Ethics and Moral Behavior in the CJ System

Title: Ethical Foundations of Criminal Justice

Author: Hall, Richard / Dennis, Carolyn Brown / Chipman, Tere L.

Title: Justice, Crime and Ethics - Text and Study Guide

Author: Hall, Richard / Dennis, Carolyn Brown / Chipman, Tere L

Criminal Justice Administration

Title: Criminal Justice Organizations

Author: Stan Stojkovic, David Kalinich, John Klofas

Juvenile Justice Administration

Title: Juvenile Delinquency: Historical, Theoretical and Societal Reactions to Youth

Author: Paul M. Sharp, Barry W. Hancock

Title: Readings in Juvenile Justice Administration

Author: Barry C. Feld

Criminological Theory

Title: Criminological Theory

Author: Franklin P. Williams III and Marilyn D. McShane

Title: Criminology Theory: Selected Classic Readings

Author: Franklin P. Williams III and Marilyn D. McShane

Criminal Justice Planning and Innovation

Title: Criminal Justice: Policy And Planning

Author: Wayne N. Welsh, Philip W. Harris

Critical Issues: Law Enforcement

Title: Critical Issues in Policing : Contemporary Readings

Author: Dunham, Roger G. / Alpert, Geoffrey P

Title: Controversies in Policing

Author: Quint C. Thurman, Andrew Giacomazzi

Critical/Controversial Issues: Corrections

Title: The Dilemmas of Corrections: Multidisciplinary Perspectives

Author: Kenneth C. Haas (Editor), Geoffrey P. Alpert (Editor)

Special Topics in Criminal Justice Organizational Management

Title: The Administration and Management of Criminal Justice Organizations: A Book of Readings

Author: STOJKOVIC

Political Terrorism (Elective)

Title: Understanding Terrorism: Challenges, Perspectives, and Issues

Author: Gus Martin

Title: The New Era of Terrorism: Selected Readings

Author: Gus Martin

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So my current class is on criminal justice ethics, and one of the texts mentions Ayn Rand! It includes her in a section on ethical egoism. I wish I could say it was a positive or even accurate commentary, but the best thing I can say is that she was included at all. The book is The Ethical Foundations of Criminal Justice and here is the terrible paraphrasing of Miss Rand's ethics:

A second line of argument in support of moral egoism, suggested by Ayn Rand, is that egoism, by urging us to pursue our own best interests single-mindedly, fully respects the integrity of the individual; whereas altruism, by urging us to disregard our interests in the pursuit of others’, requires us to sacrifice ourselves to them which does violence to our individual integrity. After all, even Jesus says we ought to love our neighbors as ourselves, not more so.

Yes, I know.

The authors present two arguments against this. First they say that Ayn Rand is overvaluing the individual, saying “the collective interest of society also counts for something” and “Rand needs to show exactly why I should put my interests first.” They also claim that she presents a false choice “to act selfishly or to sacrifice ourselves completely for another’s sake.”

Well, there is a wide middle-ground between these extremes. A constable helps an old lady to cross the street. He did not have to do this; it might have been slightly inconvenient for him to have done so, and meanwhile he might have missed the chance of catching the eye of an attractive blonde. But it can hardly be said that this altruistic act was heroic, whereby he sacrificed as much of himself as a martyr would have done. To say that he did would be comically hyperbolic.

I don’t feel the need to answer these “critiques” here, because the problem is the authors obviously never read her work to begin with. However, I thought I’d share just the same.

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bborg,

Maybe you can write the author and let them know that you do not agree with their critique of Ayn Rand's ethics? I have written many different authors on all sorts of subjects and usually get no reply. But, I achieve my goal by letting the author(s) know that someone has read their fallacious material and they did not get away with their actions.

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A constable helps an old lady to cross the street. He did not have to do this; it might have been slightly inconvenient for him to have done so, and meanwhile he might have missed the chance of catching the eye of an attractive blonde. But it can hardly be said that this altruistic act was heroic, whereby he sacrificed as much of himself as a martyr would have done. To say that he did would be comically hyperbolic.
So, the constable's job, for which he's paid, does not include assisting law-abiding individuals, protecting the safety of an elderly woman, maintaining and enhancing the public image of the police force, or just the exercise of benevolent goodwill?

Actually, a bizarre example, if you really think about it. Is "catching the eye of an attractive blond" -- that is, hitting on the client, essentially -- part of his job description? Is the superlative execution of ones job not in ones self-interest? The "Little Acts of Kindness = Little Acts of Altruism" equation, as usual, gives the game away, since it implies, even as they sneer at their caricature of Rand, that these are little inconveniences, that they are unpleasant and leave the do-er just a little worse off for the sacrifice than before. It has to hurt to be good.

The Jesus comment tells us we have Christian Altruists providing an explanation of something they just plain don't comprehend, and/or don't want to. No surprise there. And, although, in line with RayK's suggestion to write the authors, which I've done for OpEds, at least, I don't think it would make a bit of difference and the right audience for a correction would be the other students and the prof, as long as it doesn't jeopardize your grade.

And, yes, I know that I've said nothing you don't already know. But that's a pretty lame argument, as lame arguments go. It probably wouldn't hurt to dispatch it if it comes up. Even as they cavalierly dismiss self-interest in this jello-like example, this is a step in the dangerous process of relegating "selfishness" to criminals and criminal behavior and The Good (Christian Altruism, ultimately Kant's Categorical Imperative) to the Altruist Samaritans, the Good Guys. And that, in itself, is criminal.

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I have no intention of writing the author, who says at one point,

Indeed, in what sense is it morally right at all to act according to self-interst? It just does not seem to make sense to talk that way. It goes against the grain of that moral common sense, which, as we discussed in an earlier chapter, is a criterion that any normative ethical theory must meet in order to be acceptable.

He later refers to Kant as "one of the five or so greatest philosophers".

It's also interesting that he lumps Aristotle with Kant as an advocate of formalism because he believed ethics is based in man's nature. Say "natural law" and of course you're talking about reason and so (in this guy's mind) you're talking about deontology. What, reason connected to reality? No way! :wacko: In fact, he claims that the goal of Aristotle's ethics is "rational contemplation of existence", with no mention of happiness.

The other text is marginally better.

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I do not think that I could change the author's ideas and that is not my primary intention. I just like to let them know that they have been caught, fear is a wonderful tool if properly used.

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After rereading my post from above I would like to clarify my statments so that there is no misunderstanding. When I wrote about fear being useful/wonderful I did not mean physical fear as in beating someone up. I meant the fear to be like the curtain being pulled away such as was done in the movie The Wizard of Oz. The fear on the wizards face is a perfect example of the petty tyrant or power seeker being found to be a fake.

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