Joss Delage

NPR listener - should contribute?

12 posts in this topic

Hi,

I listen to NPR quite a bit. Although they are biased, this varies on a program by program basis (the worst being "Living on Earth", "Alternative Radio", and "Speaker's Forum"). Generally speaking, I find their stuff useful to keep track of what's happening.

My question to you is, do I have a moral obligation to contribute? Right now, I have chosen not to, because I oppose their editorial bias.

More generally, does a user of a "common" have a moral obligation to contribute, including when the use does not create any burden to the provider or other users?

Thanks,

Joss

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My question to you is, do I have a moral obligation to contribute?  Right now, I have chosen not to, because I oppose their editorial bias.

The only moral obligation you have toward others are those that arise from your own actions such as keeping your promises and contracts, caring for children you create, cleaning up the milk you spill on someone else's floor, etc.

What you get from NPR comes under the category of unsolicited values -- See Moral Dilemma #1 -- and what you choose to do about it is entirely up to you based on your own hierarchy of values. You don't have any obligation to NPR.

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My question to you is, do I have a moral obligation to contribute? 

I think we all have a moral obligation to expose the hypocrisy involved in NPR, and similar programs in the arts. They claim to be "non" commercial, but, in fact, they depend highly on the contributions of corporations, which are then given prominent publicity.

Subtle advertising, but still advertising. No? Or is this just my pet peeve because my entire life as a performing musician has been so influenced by the atmosphere of "getting grants" and it all started with the speech given to promote the NEA at my commencement?

:)

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When the annual NPR and PBS 'beg-a-thons' roll around, my standard reply is:

"No thanks, I gave at the IRS."

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When the annual NPR and PBS 'beg-a-thons' roll around, my standard reply is:

"No thanks, I gave at the IRS."

I'm in the process of opening a business. Despite not being open yet, I've been in the Yellow Pages for over a year, because I thought I was going to open last spring, but the lease negotiations at the time fell through and I had to seek another location. As result of being in the book, I get calls looking for service, calls looking for employment, calls looking to sell things, and, to my great irritation, calls asking for charity.

To these latter, I have a standard reply: "Oh, sure! We have an entire organization that handles that end of things! Let me give you the number..."

When they call that number, they hear, "Thank you for contacting the Internal Revenue Service..." Haven't had a single call back.

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When the annual NPR and PBS 'beg-a-thons' roll around, my standard reply is:

"No thanks, I gave at the IRS."

I was going to raise this same point. Keep in mind that NPR is partly funded by your tax dollars and continues to spend part of that money to lobby for more. When calculating how much NPR is worth to you, be sure to remember that they are already taking money from you by force.

Whatever you might have given might be better spent on tapes of The Leonard Peikoff Show. They're quite entertaining. :)

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Thanks. I haven't contributed anything, mostly because I don't want to support part of their programs.

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I think there's a moral obligation to starve them of contributions until they stop feeding at the public trough.

According to their website, only 1-2% of their annual budget comes from government funding. Why don't they just stop accepting government money and run themselves as legitimate company?

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According to their website, only 1-2% of their annual budget comes from government funding

1-2% of NPR's budget comes directly from government funding. A larger percentage of their funding comes from member stations.

Member stations receive much more substantial shares of government funding. Chicago's station is 12%, split as 8% federal and 4% state if memory serves. When member stations pay NPR their programming fees, those fees are not counted as government funding.

On top of that, NPR and its member stations operate tax-free.

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1-2% of NPR's budget comes directly from government funding. A larger percentage of their funding comes from member stations.

Member stations receive much more substantial shares of government funding. Chicago's station is 12%, split as 8% federal and 4% state if memory serves. When member stations pay NPR their programming fees, those fees are not counted as government funding.

On top of that, NPR and its member stations operate tax-free.

Ahh, now this is a whole different can of worms! That 1-2% figure did seem low, and I didn't even think about the tax issue. It saddens me that the only classical and jazz stations in my area are funded in this manner.

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I say that you don't. They will have plenty of subscribers anyways. If, by some chance they aren't as biased(or you prefer to remain on such shows as car talk, what do you know, cypress avenue)then you might want to contribute.

No obligations, however. It is your choice, and by no way are you obligated to follow through and do it.

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