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The Caste System in America

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A blaze that killed a couple and their 3-year-old son in their suburban Chicago apartment may have had its point of origin on the other side of the world, in India's ancient Hindu caste system.

Prosecutors say Subhash Chander, an immigrant from India, doused the place with gasoline and set the fire - killing his pregnant daughter, son-in-law and their child - because he believed the young woman had married beneath her station.

While some family members dispute such a connection, the weekend deaths served as a reminder that the caste system - a rigid set of social strata in which status is determined by birth, with the Brahmins being the highest caste - is still honored by people from India more than 60 years after it was outlawed.

"His son-in-law was beneath him, in his opinion," prosecutor Robert Milan said of the 57-year-old Chander.

He was jailed without bail on charges of murder, arson and intentional homicide of an unborn child in the deaths of 22-year-old Monika Rani, her 36-year-old husband, Rajesh Kumar, and their son, Vansh.

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Chander told police he spilled gasoline at his daughter's apartment Saturday during "a pushing match" with his son-in-law, and ignited the fuel with a lighter because he was angry, authorities said.

But prosecutors said they doubt there was a fight. They said the victims may have been asleep, noting that everyone else in apartment building was able to escape.

Shweder said that if Chander's daughter did marry a man in a lower caste, or "kinship group," a simple visit to the couple's home would have been incredibly tense.

"To go to that other kinship group without being invited is itself a kind of breach and the father would think he was behaving in a way that was kind of humiliating," the scholar said. He added: "It's not hard to see how he would just lose it."

In India, women are commonly killed in disputes over dowries, with the victims often doused with gasoline and set on fire in what the killers sometimes explain away as kitchen accidents.

Fire Deaths Raise Caste System Questions

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A blaze that killed a couple and their 3-year-old son in their suburban Chicago apartment may have had its point of origin on the other side of the world, in India's ancient Hindu caste system.

Prosecutors say Subhash Chander, an immigrant from India, doused the place with gasoline and set the fire - killing his pregnant daughter, son-in-law and their child - because he believed the young woman had married beneath her station.

While some family members dispute such a connection, the weekend deaths served as a reminder that the caste system - a rigid set of social strata in which status is determined by birth, with the Brahmins being the highest caste - is still honored by people from India more than 60 years after it was outlawed.

"His son-in-law was beneath him, in his opinion," prosecutor Robert Milan said of the 57-year-old Chander.

He was jailed without bail on charges of murder, arson and intentional homicide of an unborn child in the deaths of 22-year-old Monika Rani, her 36-year-old husband, Rajesh Kumar, and their son, Vansh.

----------------

Chander told police he spilled gasoline at his daughter's apartment Saturday during "a pushing match" with his son-in-law, and ignited the fuel with a lighter because he was angry, authorities said.

But prosecutors said they doubt there was a fight. They said the victims may have been asleep, noting that everyone else in apartment building was able to escape.

Shweder said that if Chander's daughter did marry a man in a lower caste, or "kinship group," a simple visit to the couple's home would have been incredibly tense.

"To go to that other kinship group without being invited is itself a kind of breach and the father would think he was behaving in a way that was kind of humiliating," the scholar said. He added: "It's not hard to see how he would just lose it."

In India, women are commonly killed in disputes over dowries, with the victims often doused with gasoline and set on fire in what the killers sometimes explain away as kitchen accidents.

Fire Deaths Raise Caste System Questions

We get this a lot in the UK. You may notice the complete absence of condemnation of this practice from the left. It's quite remarkable.

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We get this a lot in the UK. You may notice the complete absence of condemnation of this practice from the left. It's quite remarkable.
Well, after all! Who are we to judge? It's a cultural thing.

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We get this a lot in the UK. You may notice the complete absence of condemnation of this practice from the left. It's quite remarkable.
Well, after all! Who are we to judge? It's a cultural thing.

You will note that they don't hesitate to condemn OUR values. These leftists are sleaze bags.

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We get this a lot in the UK. You may notice the complete absence of condemnation of this practice from the left. It's quite remarkable.
Well, after all! Who are we to judge? It's a cultural thing.

You will note that they don't hesitate to condemn OUR values. These leftists are sleaze bags.

Sleazebags? Certainly. But also notice the naked cowardice: they steadfastly refuse to condemn those who actually do initiate force, while attacking those who never would.

Why do they do this? I guess it could be one of a few reasons. Perhaps they don't want to believe that a threat exists, so they attack those who claim it does, which they perceive to be a threat because it challenges their defense value of denial. Or, in the case of those who do recognize a threat from our enemies, blame western civilization in order to appease and absolve them from blame (and hopefully, through their pandering, avoid being harmed).

And, since they know the good guys won't hurt them, they can vent their righteous indignation at us (America, the west, the military, the police, etc.). They know that we do, in fact, respect their rights, which means they have nothing to fear from us. But I bet if they really thought we didn't respect their rights, they'd shut up in a heartbeat.

Is that harsh? If so, they've earned it.

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