Mercury

Canadian Publisher Persecuted for Cartoons

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A Canadian publisher, Ezra Levant, is on trial by the Canadian Human Rights Commission for publishing the Danish, "anti-Islamic" cartoons. His defiance of the Commission is first-rate. I found the story on Little Green Footballs and on Instapundit (which refers to the LGF story).

Here's the Instapundit intro:

CANADA'S KANGAROO COURT: On video. More here.

UPDATE: "Pure, uncompromising brilliance."

ANOTHER UPDATE: Comments from Mark Steyn.

Ms McGovern, a blandly unexceptional bureaucrat, is a classic example of the syndrome. No "vulnerable" Canadian Muslim has been attacked over the cartoons, but the cartoonists had to go into hiding, and a gang of Muslim youths turned up at their children's grade schools, and Muslim rioters around the world threatened death to anyone who published them, and even managed to kill a few folks who had nothing to do with them. Nonetheless, upon receiving a complaint from a Saudi imam trained at an explicitly infidelophobic academy and who's publicly called for the introduction of sharia in Canada, Shirlene McGovern decides that the purely hypothetical backlash to Muslims takes precedence over any actual backlash against anybody else.

Read the whole thing.

MORE: Canadian reader Duane Mailing emails:

WOW! Those videos are absolutely incredible! Best thing I ever heard from the mouth of a Canadian. I was laughing so hard I was crying. A real man stands and speaks the truth....in this day and age...brilliant! I never thought I'd hear anything in real life that compares to Howard Roark's courtroom speech from Ayn Rand's The Fountainhead but I just did and I can hardly believe it. I am truly inspired by Ezra Levant.

I expect this will get a lot of attention.

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Wow. Those videos made my day! Thanks for posting this, Mercury.

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In addition to the coverage at Little Green Footballs, go to http://www.ezralevant.com .

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Levant is eloquent and right on target, and it's a pleasure to see him shred the very existence of the "Human Rights Commission" from the start. I have to wonder if he's read Atlas. It's unfortunate that he throws a bone to "moderate Islam" at the end; as with some other, otherwise brilliant and brave commentators, he does not seem to entirely grasp the evil of religion as such, including the "moderates" who support and enable the "extremists".

The real problem, as he makes clear, is that Canada has sunken so low that this commission even exists and has now become a proxy for Islam to attack its critics, at a minimum draining their time and money even if nothing more occurs. As far as I know, in the U.S. that is still "only" happening in the multicultural universities, and hasn't yet reached the point where a publisher can be forced before some commission (if anybody knows otherwise, please post on it.)

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From Levant's website:

If you don't pay attention, you might not even realize that freedoms are being eroded. I had half-expected a combative, missionary-style interrogator. I found, instead, a limp clerk who was just punching the clock. She had done it dozens of times before, and will do it dozens of times again. In a way, that's more terrifying.

From The Fountainhead:

It was a contest without time, a struggle of two abstractions, the thing that had created the building against the things that made the play possible—two forces, suddenly naked to her in their simple statement—two forces that had fought since the world began—and every religion had known of them—and there had always been a God and a Devil—only men had been so mistaken about the shapes of their Devil—he was not single and big, he was many and smutty and small.

It's only appropriate that one religion, Islam, would use its ultimate product - thoughtless, soulless drones, such as his pathetic interrogator and those who enabled her position, who believe they have some right to smother anybody honestly identifying reality with their sheer weight and volume.

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It's really nice to hear something positive about Canada recognized by the world.

Thanks for posting this. :huh:

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It's really nice to hear something positive about Canada recognized by the world.

I don't understand this. Ezra Levant is being persecuted by the Canadian government. Yes, he himself is Canadian, but not representative of most Canadians. If I were a prospective immigrant, looking for a place where I could freely speak and use my mind, those videos alone would convince me to look elsewhere than Canada.

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I meant the actions of Ezra Levant. Not the Canadian government.

I think it's hideous what the gov. is doing, but I'm talking about Ezra here.

Well, a lot of the people I speak to everyday feel this way as well.

They may not know the explicit principles involved like we do, but they do feel it.

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I've just watched the video of this mans opening statement. I give this man much , much applause.

I am proud to call him a fellow Canadian. :huh:

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It's really nice to hear something positive about Canada recognized by the world.

I don't understand this. Ezra Levant is being persecuted by the Canadian government. Yes, he himself is Canadian, but not representative of most Canadians. If I were a prospective immigrant, looking for a place where I could freely speak and use my mind, those videos alone would convince me to look elsewhere than Canada.

Well, many of us immigrants have little choice, and Canada provides a safe haven in many respects. At least, in that country, there aren't popular talk-show hosts and cable news channels denigrating immigrants on the hour.

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Well, many of us immigrants have little choice, and Canada provides a safe haven in many respects. At least, in that country, there aren't popular talk-show hosts and cable news channels denigrating immigrants on the hour.

It's a plus for Canada that it does (apparently) accept immigrants more readily than America, to America's great shame - though I don't think you'd find your welcome lasting very long if you started to get onto a public radar by discussing Islam or socialized medicine.

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Well, I'm going to focus on how truly heroic this man is whether he is from Canada, U.S or India.

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Well, many of us immigrants have little choice, and Canada provides a safe haven in many respects. At least, in that country, there aren't popular talk-show hosts and cable news channels denigrating immigrants on the hour.

It's a plus for Canada that it does (apparently) accept immigrants more readily than America, to America's great shame - though I don't think you'd find your welcome lasting very long if you started to get onto a public radar by discussing Islam or socialized medicine.

You make a major point, but I think Canada's physical closeness to America can be leveraged in such battles. If an immigrant were to become a Canadian citizen and then build a continental reputation as a crusader for reason and capitalism, he could then move to America -- see Ayaan Hirsi Ali as a prime example of this process.

But, all this supposes that an Ezra Levant (or a Mark Steyn) wouldn't win his battle against the Canadian government. Remember that the Dutch minister's actions against Hirsi Ali are widely believed to have brought down that government.

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Well, many of us immigrants have little choice, and Canada provides a safe haven in many respects. At least, in that country, there aren't popular talk-show hosts and cable news channels denigrating immigrants on the hour.

It's a plus for Canada that it does (apparently) accept immigrants more readily than America, to America's great shame - though I don't think you'd find your welcome lasting very long if you started to get onto a public radar by discussing Islam or socialized medicine.

Can I find out the basis for each of your statements?

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Well, many of us immigrants have little choice, and Canada provides a safe haven in many respects. At least, in that country, there aren't popular talk-show hosts and cable news channels denigrating immigrants on the hour.

It's a plus for Canada that it does (apparently) accept immigrants more readily than America, to America's great shame - though I don't think you'd find your welcome lasting very long if you started to get onto a public radar by discussing Islam or socialized medicine.

Can I find out the basis for each of your statements?

I am sorry, I should be specific. Can you tell me why each of you think "there aren't popular talk-show hosts and cable news channels denigrating immigrants on the hour' and "Canada [...] accept immigrants more readily than America"?

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Can I find out the basis for each of your statements?

Over some years of observation - not a rigorous study admittedly - it's appeared that Canada is more receptive to immigrants than America has been in recent years. For example, when wealthy individuals left Hong Kong before the Chinese handover, they were encouraged to settle in Canada; the U.S. government didn't go out of its way to try to attract these hard working, wealthy individuals. I've read of many recent instances, including experiences from Objectivists (some of whom have posted here in the past and may still be reading this), who've undergone great struggles to try to immigrate to America, not always with success. An uneducated Mexican is ignored; but be an associate professor of biology and it's years of uncertainty and difficulty (e.g. an Objectivist biology professor working on anti-aging research.) For students, it appears to be easier now to enter to study in Canada; the U.S. government via "Homeland Security" has made it increasingly burdensome for them to get visas in this country, and it seems that little effort is made to encourage them to *stay* here once they have their degree.

I'd be very interested in hearing your perspective on Canadian/American immigration - I'm sure that you are more knowledgeable about the current state of affairs.

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Over some years of observation - not a rigorous study admittedly - it's appeared that Canada is more receptive to immigrants than America has been in recent years. For example, when wealthy individuals left Hong Kong before the Chinese handover, they were encouraged to settle in Canada; the U.S. government didn't go out of its way to try to attract these hard working, wealthy individuals.

I considered that rhetoric too, but the problem of immigrating to Canada for one who actually has economic and educational prospects is that you are less likely to be get PR status in a timely manner compared to a "family reunification" or a refugee. Note that family reunification refers to sponsorship of relatives and spouses, and the delays are purported to be based on these values: 1) family reunification 2) refugee acceptance (UN) and then finally 3) business and economic migrants. Try getting through the red tape of proving you want to migrate to Canada under the business class and the rhetoric falls short - 3 years plus of just waiting, depending on your country of origin. Some international students who, literally, get lucky, and manage to be screened out of an interview (for unclear and apparently random reasons) get their PR status faster; by the time they're done honors thesis, they've got to the final stage of security clearance.

The United States still does accept more legal immigrants than any other nation, despite its failure to move towards open immigration. My recollection from some contract work I did for USINS in 2007 was that we took about 38 million in 2006.

An uneducated Mexican is ignored; but be an associate professor of biology and it's years of uncertainty and difficulty (e.g. an Objectivist biology professor working on anti-aging research.) For students, it appears to be easier now to enter to study in Canada; the U.S. government via "Homeland Security" has made it increasingly burdensome for them to get visas in this country, and it seems that little effort is made to encourage them to *stay* here once they have their degree.

Agreed.

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From Levant's website:
If you don't pay attention, you might not even realize that freedoms are being eroded. I had half-expected a combative, missionary-style interrogator. I found, instead, a limp clerk who was just punching the clock. She had done it dozens of times before, and will do it dozens of times again. In a way, that's more terrifying.

From The Fountainhead:

It was a contest without time, a struggle of two abstractions, the thing that had created the building against the things that made the play possible—two forces, suddenly naked to her in their simple statement—two forces that had fought since the world began—and every religion had known of them—and there had always been a God and a Devil—only men had been so mistaken about the shapes of their Devil—he was not single and big, he was many and smutty and small.

It's only appropriate that one religion, Islam, would use its ultimate product - thoughtless, soulless drones, such as his pathetic interrogator and those who enabled her position, who believe they have some right to smother anybody honestly identifying reality with their sheer weight and volume.

That's exactly what came to my mind. There is no leviathan to conquer, rather it's much more frightening. These are nameless, faceless, unaccountable bureaucrats. These are the kind of people you run into at the DMV, or IRS.

That guy was awesome, righteous and rational. William Wallace lives!

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Over some years of observation - not a rigorous study admittedly - it's appeared that Canada is more receptive to immigrants than America has been in recent years. For example, when wealthy individuals left Hong Kong before the Chinese handover, they were encouraged to settle in Canada; the U.S. government didn't go out of its way to try to attract these hard working, wealthy individuals.

I considered that rhetoric too, but the problem of immigrating to Canada for one who actually has economic and educational prospects is that you are less likely to be get PR status in a timely manner compared to a "family reunification" or a refugee. Note that family reunification refers to sponsorship of relatives and spouses, and the delays are purported to be based on these values: 1) family reunification 2) refugee acceptance (UN) and then finally 3) business and economic migrants. Try getting through the red tape of proving you want to migrate to Canada under the business class and the rhetoric falls short - 3 years plus of just waiting, depending on your country of origin. Some international students who, literally, get lucky, and manage to be screened out of an interview (for unclear and apparently random reasons) get their PR status faster; by the time they're done honors thesis, they've got to the final stage of security clearance.

The United States still does accept more legal immigrants than any other nation, despite its failure to move towards open immigration. My recollection from some contract work I did for USINS in 2007 was that we took about 38 million in 2006.

Could you provide a reference for, and breakdown of, the categories in which you claim the US "accept[ed] more legal immigrants than any other nation"? By "immigrants" here, I mean permanent immigrants, not visitors or students.

By my own experience, the skilled class application for permanent residency in Canada is far easier and more rights-respecting than the American one. The US cap on H-1Bs is under 200,000 annually and the H-1 visa class is America's main avenue for skilled workers, so I wonder who these 38 million are.

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Well, many of us immigrants have little choice, and Canada provides a safe haven in many respects. At least, in that country, there aren't popular talk-show hosts and cable news channels denigrating immigrants on the hour.

It's a plus for Canada that it does (apparently) accept immigrants more readily than America, to America's great shame - though I don't think you'd find your welcome lasting very long if you started to get onto a public radar by discussing Islam or socialized medicine.

Can I find out the basis for each of your statements?

I am sorry, I should be specific. Can you tell me why each of you think "there aren't popular talk-show hosts and cable news channels denigrating immigrants on the hour' and "Canada [...] accept immigrants more readily than America"?

[Emphasis mine.]

Are the biggest TV and radio talk-show hosts in Canada (famous on the scale of Lou Dobbs, Rush Limbaugh, Bill O'Reilly, Glenn Beck, and their ilk of ingrates) denigrating immigrants all day and every day? If so, let me know.

Thanks.

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I considered that rhetoric too, but the problem of immigrating to Canada for one who actually has economic and educational prospects is that you are less likely to be get PR status in a timely manner compared to a "family reunification" or a refugee. Note that family reunification refers to sponsorship of relatives and spouses, and the delays are purported to be based on these values: 1) family reunification 2) refugee acceptance (UN) and then finally 3) business and economic migrants. Try getting through the red tape of proving you want to migrate to Canada under the business class and the rhetoric falls short - 3 years plus of just waiting, depending on your country of origin. Some international students who, literally, get lucky, and manage to be screened out of an interview (for unclear and apparently random reasons) get their PR status faster; by the time they're done honors thesis, they've got to the final stage of security clearance.

That sounds like a typical bureaucratic/altruist driven process, for sure.

The United States still does accept more legal immigrants than any other nation, despite its failure to move towards open immigration. My recollection from some contract work I did for USINS in 2007 was that we took about 38 million in 2006.

According to this Washington Post article, the total number of immigrants was about a record 37.5 million, though I'm virtually certain that that's a total current number inclusive of all previous years, not a 2006 delta.

Though Wikipedia has questionable accuracy overall, the article offers these plausible figures as the 2006 delta:

In 2006, a total of 1,266,264 immigrants became legal permanent residents of the United States, up from 601,516 in 1987, 849,807 in 2000, and 1,122,373 in 2005. The top twelve migrant-sending countries in 2006, by country of birth, were Mexico (173,753), People's Republic of China (87,345), Philippines (74,607), India (61,369), Cuba (45,614), Colombia (43,151), Dominican Republic (38,069), El Salvador (31,783), Vietnam (30,695), Jamaica (24,976), South Korea (24,386), Guatemala (24,146), Other countries - 606,370.[11] In fiscal year 2006, 202 refugees from Iraq were allowed to resettle in the United States.[12][13] Muslim immigration to the U.S. is rising and in 2005 alone more people from Muslim countries became legal permanent U.S. residents — nearly 96,000 — than in any year in the previous two decades.[14][15]

I can't readily find an article showing total immigration figures on a country basis but it's believable that the U.S. still leads in total numbers; still, I think, far too restrictive.

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Try getting through the red tape of proving you want to migrate to Canada under the business class and the rhetoric falls short - 3 years plus of just waiting, depending on your country of origin.

My first hand experience has been the opposite to what you are reporting. In my case, my family went through Canadian point system and the whole process took 8 months. Canadians welcomed my family with open arms. In US there was no such possibility - no structured process based on merit. Instead, our options were to try to win a green card in a lottery.

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