Joss Delage

Google just as bad as Microsoft...

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From their official blog:

http://googleblog.blogspot.com/

Yahoo! and the future of the Internet

2/03/2008 11:45:00 AM

Posted by David Drummond, Senior Vice President, Corporate Development and Chief Legal Officer

The openness of the Internet is what made Google -- and Yahoo! -- possible. A good idea that users find useful spreads quickly. Businesses can be created around the idea. Users benefit from constant innovation. It's what makes the Internet such an exciting place.

So Microsoft's hostile bid for Yahoo! raises troubling questions. This is about more than simply a financial transaction, one company taking over another. It's about preserving the underlying principles of the Internet: openness and innovation.

Could Microsoft now attempt to exert the same sort of inappropriate and illegal influence over the Internet that it did with the PC? While the Internet rewards competitive innovation, Microsoft has frequently sought to establish proprietary monopolies -- and then leverage its dominance into new, adjacent markets.

Could the acquisition of Yahoo! allow Microsoft -- despite its legacy of serious legal and regulatory offenses -- to extend unfair practices from browsers and operating systems to the Internet? In addition, Microsoft plus Yahoo! equals an overwhelming share of instant messaging and web email accounts. And between them, the two companies operate the two most heavily trafficked portals on the Internet. Could a combination of the two take advantage of a PC software monopoly to unfairly limit the ability of consumers to freely access competitors' email, IM, and web-based services? Policymakers around the world need to ask these questions -- and consumers deserve satisfying answers.

This hostile bid was announced on Friday, so there is plenty of time for these questions to be thoroughly addressed. We take Internet openness, choice and innovation seriously. They are the core of our culture. We believe that the interests of Internet users come first -- and should come first -- as the merits of this proposed acquisition are examined and alternatives explored.

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Don't you mean, just as bad as Netscape?

But I love how a jealous competitor can always be relied upon to look out for the interests of the consumer. :) I suppose if Microsoft had made the same offer to Google, they would have sent them packing, right?

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Actually, I think the comparison of Microsoft to Google in the thread title is very appropriate.

Today, Google is trying to get the government to act to block their competitors - Microsoft and Yahoo - from merging.

But remember when Google bought out Doubleclick? Back then - not too long ago even - the shoe was on the other foot, in that Microsoft was trying to get the government to take action against that merger.

Also, back when Netscape and AOL merged, Microsoft tried to block that one too. They said that the merged company would have too much of the "instant messaging" market.

Of course, Microsoft has been attacked by so many of its competitors on antitrust grounds that I've lost track of them all.

(And note that these companies are sometimes allies in their depredations. E.g., consider the campaign for "net neutrality," in which Microsoft, Google and a whole raft of other companies are trying to get the government to initiate force against the owners of the physical internet infrastructure.)

There are, sadly, many companies in this industry who do not hesitate to attempt to use the government to initiate force against their competitors. In the case of Microsoft and Google, they appear to deserve each other. I've gotten used to the fact that these two big successful companies keep running to the government with cries of "unfair!" to try to block their competitors' mergers.

Maybe if this keeps happening, people will start to see the antitrust laws as merely tools that are used by envious companies to try to destroy their competitors.

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Ah, I confess I haven't paid attention to Microsoft's practices since the anti-trust business.

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Maybe if this keeps happening, people will start to see the antitrust laws as merely tools that are used by envious companies to try to destroy their competitors.
A true cut-throat competition.

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Actually, I think the comparison of Microsoft to Google in the thread title is very appropriate.

Today, Google is trying to get the government to act to block their competitors - Microsoft and Yahoo - from merging.

But remember when Google bought out Doubleclick? Back then - not too long ago even - the shoe was on the other foot, in that Microsoft was trying to get the government to take action against that merger.

Yeah, that was exactly my point. No principles anywhere...

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