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B. Royce

Browning's Lyric

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I have re-written the seventh line of Robert Browning's The Year's At The Spring.

The year's at the spring

And the day's at the morn;

Morning's at seven;

The hillside's dew-pearled;

The lark's on the wing;

The snail's on the thorn:

Reason's man's leaven---

All's right with the world!

_____________________________

B.F.

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A more deviant variation:

The world's at its spring

And its students are ripe

To grasp Ayn Rand's thought

And to tear up Kant's tripe.

The lark's on the wing;

The summer's in sight;

Man's light has man caught

And his bright fingers type.

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A more deviant variation:

The world's at its spring

And its students are ripe

To grasp Ayn Rand's thought

And to tear up Kant's tripe.

The lark's on the wing;

The summer's in sight;

Man's light has man caught

And his bright fingers type.

Even Better!

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Another:

The world's at its spring

And life's students are ripe

To swear Ayn Rand's thought

And to tear up Kant's tripe.

The eagle's on wing;

High summer's in sight;

Pride's mark has man caught

And he turns up his light.

___________________________

Brian Faulkner

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Another:

The world's at its spring

And life's students are ripe

To swear Ayn Rand's thought

And to tear up Kant's tripe.

The eagle's on wing;

High summer's in sight;

Pride's mark has man caught

And he turns up his light.

___________________________

Brian Faulkner

The last 4 verses tie in much better.

I prefered "To grasp Ayn Rand's thought."

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Another:

The world's at its spring

And life's students are ripe

To swear Ayn Rand's thought

And to tear up Kant's tripe.

The eagle's on wing;

High summer's in sight;

Pride's mark has man caught

And he turns up his light.

___________________________

Brian Faulkner

The last 4 verses tie in much better.

I prefered "To grasp Ayn Rand's thought."

Yes, Roger, the last four lines are better now. "grasp" makes the line a little awkward, a little too full for the mouth. "swear", as in "swear by it", indicates conviction and loyalty, while the contrasting "t" in the rhyming "tear" flows more smoothly and more forcibly. Of course, one could argue that the "grasping" must come first, but that is a prose argument, not a musical poetic one.

But thanks for stating your preferrence, as you are always welcome to do. It's much appreciated.

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Yes, Roger, the last four lines are better now. "grasp" makes the line a little awkward, a little too full for the mouth. "swear", as in "swear by it", indicates conviction and loyalty, while the contrasting "t" in the rhyming "tear" flows more smoothly and more forcibly. Of course, one could argue that the "grasping" must come first, but that is a prose argument, not a musical poetic one.

But thanks for stating your preferrence, as you are always welcome to do. It's much appreciated.

Brian, My apologies I miss read it. I read an additional "to" so which made it "to swear to Ayn Rand's thought". "to swear Ayn Rand's thought" is perfect.

I'm finding it very instructional to watch these rewrites and see how you alter the words to alter the meanings. Also the revisions are interesting to see.

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Yes, Roger, the last four lines are better now. "grasp" makes the line a little awkward, a little too full for the mouth. "swear", as in "swear by it", indicates conviction and loyalty, while the contrasting "t" in the rhyming "tear" flows more smoothly and more forcibly. Of course, one could argue that the "grasping" must come first, but that is a prose argument, not a musical poetic one.

But thanks for stating your preferrence, as you are always welcome to do. It's much appreciated.

Brian, My apologies I miss read it. I read an additional "to" so which made it "to swear to Ayn Rand's thought". "to swear Ayn Rand's thought" is perfect.

I'm finding it very instructional to watch these rewrites and see how you alter the words to alter the meanings. Also the revisions are interesting to see.

That's okay. I'm glad you like the final version. It's been fun. A debt, of course, to Mr. Browning----for creating the form and for his happy, confident sense of life.

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Using the same form:

The world's at the truth,

And philosophy's flaws

Are buried beneath

Objectivist laws.

"A is A", sayeth youth

To a senior applause,

And "Man's more than beast"---

The first of new saws.

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Another variant of the form:

The world's at its height,

Yet is half of the world

Blind as the night-time.

Good reason, like a flag,

Is further unfurled;

Get ready for fight-time!

Man shall not lag;

His mind-hands are curled!

___________________________

Brian Faulkner

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Another try with this form.

Man's mind is on track,

And the bridge will be crossed;

Shadow in alley,

On doorknob hand curled,

And yet..... it pulls back---

A victory won, lost.

Soon, in the valley,

Rand rights the whole world!

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