Betsy Speicher

Iron Man (2008)

Rate this movie   19 votes

  1. 1. Artistic Merit

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  2. 2. Sense of Life or Personal Value

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16 posts in this topic

I haven’t seen this movie yet, but you can read a very positive review by Scott Holleran at Box office mojo.

I know this is off-topic, but thank you for posting that review for introducing me to this reviewer. I just had to read the first sentence of this review "With the broad, essentially American theme that man is self-made, director Jon Favreau's Iron Man is made of solid, durable stuff" to see that this guy is different. I normally don't bother to read movie reviews, but I'm subscribing to this guy.

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I haven’t seen this movie yet, but you can read a very positive review by Scott Holleran at Box office mojo.

I know this is off-topic, but thank you for posting that review for introducing me to this reviewer. I just had to read the first sentence of this review "With the broad, essentially American theme that man is self-made, director Jon Favreau's Iron Man is made of solid, durable stuff" to see that this guy is different. I normally don't bother to read movie reviews, but I'm subscribing to this guy.

You might be interested in his interview of Lionsgate's (the company slated to produce Atlas Shrugged) Michael Burns here.

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Okay, that was the best Marvel movie yet. If you read comic books be sure to stay until the end of the credits. Another highlight for me was that one of Tony's lab tools is made by my company (a Tektronix Oscilloscope).

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After getting Darren's reaction to this film and reading several positive reviews, I'm definitely going to put this on my "must see" list...and soon !

theDML2112

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I took my family to see this movie today and it was well worth it. As stated in other areas, it is not deeply philosophical, but that should not keep one away from a view at a heroic, independently minded man.

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This is a great one. You have to see it! It has the verve and vitality of the first of the recent Spiderman movies, some of the moral power of Batman Begins, and will leave you wanting more. Although it doesn't have the "work-of-art" feel of Superman The Movie (1978), I was left with the impression that it belonged in the same category.

A special nod to director Jon Favreau for his unbridled depiction of America's greatness. The screenplay makes crystal clear that it is the inventive genius who gives us life, and this is, Robert Downey Jr.'s performance aside, the movie's strongest point. There is also, I think, a considerable psychological payoff for engineers in watching Tony Stark's (Iron Man) mind at work.

Robert Downey Jr.'s acting is highly enjoyable: he perfectly illustrates the character's spiritual growth and swaggering embrace of the "body" he created to match his mind. Jeff Bridges' strong support helps bring it home.

Iron Man joins Superman and Batman Begins on my list of favorite superhero movies. I intend to see it again soon.

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I’m too busy and lazy right now to write a concise post; so I turned it into a bunch of snippets:

-I’ve heard that Robert Downey Jr. was denied the role of Tony Stark/Iron Man two or three times; I can’t imagine why, because he absolutely makes the role. He’s in nearly every scene, which isn’t a bad thing.

-I no huge fan of Quenith Paltrow, but she does Pepper Potts (the super competent assistant to Tony Stark) very well; also, the chemistry between her and Robert Downey Jr. is great.

- There are some great scenes of humor. :D

- Tony Stark is not whiney like Spiderman (who got his powers by accident and barley wanted to use them) he’s also self-made. The movie makes clear that he is proud of his accomplishments. In fact, it implies that part of the reason he became Iron Man was for the sake of his own pride (as his company was being used to help some very nasty people.)

- Tons of comic book references most people won’t get (though the movie stands alone without these references.) Oh, STAY AFTER THE CREDITS!

- I love fake making. I like seeing engineers and craftsmen on screen (that was part of the reason why I liked Radio Flyer and Earnest Scared Stupid as a kid.) The movie satisfies in this way; as engineering is an important part of Tony’s character, it's given ample time in the movie (though the suit itself is somewhat at odds with Newtonian physics.)

-Great cast, I particularly like Jeff Bridges and Terrance Howard (who shows a great deal of promise if there is a sequel.)

- The ‘feeling’ of this movie is very pro-American.

-Only downsides: It could have been more philosophical (develop it’s theme better), and Tony’s plans for his company could have been given more time.

Also, this is just a minor complaint; but the main villain could have been given more weight in the story.

But all I really have is minor grievousness (which I really can’t resist making because of my geeky anal-ness.) But this is great movie, which has quickly become close to my favorite superhero movie, right under Batman Begins.

- Ryan

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- I love fake making. I like seeing engineers and craftsmen on screen (that was part of the reason why I liked Radio Flyer and Earnest Scared Stupid as a kid.) The movie satisfies in this way; as engineering is an important part of Tony’s character, it's given ample time in the movie (though the suit itself is somewhat at odds with Newtonian physics.)

If you like that sort of thing, then I highly recommend the movie Flight of the Phoenix. Not the recent disastrous remake, which was a hollow shell of a movie, but the 1965 version, starring Jimmy Stewart. Check it out here: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0059183/

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Also, this is just a minor complaint; but the main villain could have been given more weight in the story.

Thank you for making this point. There'd been something about the story that bothered me but I hadn't figured it out until I read your comment. If you want big dramatic conflict, you have to have big values in conflict; in comic books, that usually means some Big Bad Villain that poses a threat that only the hero can stop. In the movie, the threat is not clear enough. Is it some Islamic terrorist? Sort of. Is it Stane taking over the company? Sort of. Is it American weapons technology being sold to our enemies and used against us? Again, sort of.

I'm familiar enough with the character and his back story (thanks to a childhood spent immersed in the comics) to see many options in existing storylines for the film that would have strengthened the drama. The issues with Stane could have been dropped entirely, and the villain cast as an anti-American, anti-technology terrorist. But then the threat would need to be made more real, immediate, and massive.

This is a flaw in the movie, but not a fatal one.

One minor point, not exclusive to this film: I'm tired of seeing poor, helpless, anonymous peasants in danger from some cruel bad guy. It's such a cheap and easy way to generate audience anger toward the villain that I find it condescending to watch.

An interesting philosophical point was made by Stane when he took out the Islamic terrorists. He almost perfectly explicitly identifies the fact that without the support of the US, the terrorists would be utterly impotent.

Overall, worth a look, and a must-see for superhero fans (who've already seen it by now). I like the production values and great special effects. Downey is perfect casting: an alcoholic, wealthy, celebrity, playboy actor playing a businessman who is... an alcoholic, wealthy, celebrity playboy. Perfect! I can't imagine a better casting choice, and Downey is one of my fave actors to boot.

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Also, this is just a minor complaint; but the main villain could have been given more weight in the story.

Thank you for making this point. There'd been something about the story that bothered me but I hadn't figured it out until I read your comment. If you want big dramatic conflict, you have to have big values in conflict; in comic books, that usually means some Big Bad Villain that poses a threat that only the hero can stop. In the movie, the threat is not clear enough. Is it some Islamic terrorist? Sort of. Is it Stane taking over the company? Sort of. Is it American weapons technology being sold to our enemies and used against us? Again, sort of.

I disagree. The issue is not a series of "sort of"s. The enemy is precisely what the movie said it was: an evil American, who in this case was a "businessman." Without American technology, Stane states, the terrorists would be zero. He knows this, yet provides them with arms. Stane is a Stadler (of business not science).

I'm familiar enough with the character and his back story (thanks to a childhood spent immersed in the comics) to see many options in existing storylines for the film that would have strengthened the drama. The issues with Stane could have been dropped entirely, and the villain cast as an anti-American, anti-technology terrorist. But then the threat would need to be made more real, immediate, and massive.

An anti-technology terrorist wouldn't stand a chance against Tony Stark. Only a man of measure, some kind of near-equal, would have given the drama weight. Stane was that man in this context. If he fell quickly, it's because he was up against John Galt (Tony Stark). And, like that scientist said to Stane, "[He's] not Tony Stark!"

An interesting philosophical point was made by Stane when he took out the Islamic terrorists. He almost perfectly explicitly identifies the fact that without the support of the US, the terrorists would be utterly impotent.

My point precisely.

Overall, worth a look, and a must-see for superhero fans (who've already seen it by now). I like the production values and great special effects. Downey is perfect casting: an alcoholic, wealthy, celebrity, playboy actor playing a businessman who is... an alcoholic, wealthy, celebrity playboy. Perfect! I can't imagine a better casting choice, and Downey is one of my fave actors to boot.

Former alcoholic. Downey has been sober for quite a while now. I don't remember that he was a "playboy" though.

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It sounds very good. I'll have to make it out to the theater and catch this one sometime.

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I saw it last night. Great movie! It was not what I was expecting - I thought it was going to be much more of a traditional (kids) superhero movie, not so real. Echoing Ryan's view, I love the engineering aspect of the movie - I love seeing an unapologetically brilliant mind at work. Stark reminded me of Franscico in a way - good at everything he does, full of life, restless, etc. Once he overcame his alcoholic, playboy stage, he was very much how I imagined Franscico.

Great movie.

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I just saw this recently. I loved it. I like Iron Man better than Batman, I think. I love that every aspect of his powers is due to his mind, even his ability to fly. Although it ended to quickly, the very ending made up for it. It was beautiful.

Jose.

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