Joshua_Mayer

Workout regimen

53 posts in this topic

This summer, once school is out, I am going to start a workout routine and diet program; being as I have become completely out of shape. Stating this, I was wondering if anyone has any tips or critiques of my workout plan.

First: I plan on starting off slowly, avoiding heavy weights and hard workouts. In the past, I have done a hard workout in the beginning and afterwards was too sore to do any more working out for a week. This caused me to get lazy and stop my workout routine. So, for the first week, probably it will consist of running a half a mile and swimming somewhere around 500 yards. To get my muscles attuned to the idea of weights, I will do non-weight muscle toning exercises (such as push-ups, pull-ups, dips and so on...)

Once the first week is over, I will get into the real routine.

-Monday: Aerobics: Running a distance, and sprinting one lap for time.

Weights: A focus on back and shoulders (Lat pull-downs, wide pull-ups, etc.)

-Tuesday: Swimming with intervals

Ab wheel (it works wonders :-P)

-Wednesday: Running

Weights: Arms (curls, Triceps extension, etc.)

-Thursday: Swimming

Ab Wheel

-Friday: Running

Weights: Chest and legs

-Saturday and Sunday: Rest, Stretching, etc.

Any comments would be greatly appreciated!! :-D

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Just as a really quick comment, I'm not sure if there really is such a thing as 'toning' muscles. You can gain muscle, and you can lose fat, but I personally doubt there is any process by itself that is 'toning'. Individuals that are regarded as being toned more than likely have simply gained some muscle, while burning fat, leaving them with a 'cut' look.

Don't worry about heavy lifting leaving you too sore for other workouts, because you don't honestly need to be doing other workouts. High intensity weight training once a week for 30 minutes combined with a smart diet (meals that are 300-500 calories every 3-5 hours or when you get hungry) will result in a noticeable gain of muscle over time while simultaneously losing body fat.

About running, I'm not really sure what running gets you in shape for. When I was serious about competing in Jiu-Jitsu tournaments, I was able to go through several matches without tiring significantly, and I was doing zero running. I was 'in shape' to do those matches because I had lifted weights and spent large amounts of time training Jiu-Jitsu hard, so that was what I was 'in shape' for. Your body is smart, it will only improve what it needs to in response to demands you place on it.

And I have known many people who jogged frequently, and can run like the wind, yet ultimately remain pudgy. While I on the other hand lost like 12 lbs of fat in 3-4 months getting ready for a tournament by simply lifting weights once a week and reducing my calorie intake (by having the 300-500 calorie meals), and at any time during that if I were to jog a mile I would be wheezing and struggling through it. Who is 'in shape' here?

Also, muscle is very demanding. A pound of muscle requires more calories to maintain itself than a pound of fat, so if you increase your muscle mass you will make it easier to lose fat, as the daily calorie requirements for maintenance will increase. So ideally, if you are holding constant right now when it comes to body fat, and begin to increase muscle mass while holding your calorie intake constant, you will slowly but surely burn fat. That I think is the really important principle: you don't go to the gym to burn fat. You alter your body so that it is constantly burning more fat in between workouts.

Besides, if you jog a mile how many calories have you burned? 150? Eat a single candy bar or drink a single coke and you have nullified your run, and this isn't even considering the fact that those 150 calories you burned were more than likely not fat calories.

Good luck on your new regiment!

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One last thing, many people are against hard weight training because they don't want to become 'bulky'.

My response: No, no, no, no, no! Lifting weights does not make an average individual 'bulky' (whatever that concept really means), steroids and overeating do. I have been doing high intensity weight lifting for the past three years, and have gained nearly 15 lbs of muscle in that time, but you know what I look like, I'm still a fundamentally slender build and always will be. Weight training won't make you bulky, it will just take the build nature gave you and make it better. Any normal human will slowly plateau off over time when it comes to gaining muscle from weight lifting; it is only genetic and chemical freaks that turn into giant muscle bound beings.

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This summer, once school is out, I am going to start a workout routine and diet program; being as I have become completely out of shape. Stating this, I was wondering if anyone has any tips or critiques of my workout plan.

First: I plan on starting off slowly, avoiding heavy weights and hard workouts. In the past, I have done a hard workout in the beginning and afterwards was too sore to do any more working out for a week. This caused me to get lazy and stop my workout routine. So, for the first week, probably it will consist of running a half a mile and swimming somewhere around 500 yards. To get my muscles attuned to the idea of weights, I will do non-weight muscle toning exercises (such as push-ups, pull-ups, dips and so on...)

Once the first week is over, I will get into the real routine.

-Monday: Aerobics: Running a distance, and sprinting one lap for time.

Weights: A focus on back and shoulders (Lat pull-downs, wide pull-ups, etc.)

-Tuesday: Swimming with intervals

Ab wheel (it works wonders :-P)

-Wednesday: Running

Weights: Arms (curls, Triceps extension, etc.)

-Thursday: Swimming

Ab Wheel

-Friday: Running

Weights: Chest and legs

-Saturday and Sunday: Rest, Stretching, etc.

Any comments would be greatly appreciated!! :-D

My two cents would be to decide exactly what your objectives are and tailor your workouts accordingly.

So if it's aerobic fitness, then do aerobics, if it is increased strength, then low rep relatively heavy weights etc.

One thing that is vital however, it's not the training per se that gets you fitter, stronger etc. It's your body's subsequent adaptation from the stress that exercise creates. So it is vital to rest adequately and allow recovery to occur.

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This summer, once school is out, I am going to start a workout routine and diet program; being as I have become completely out of shape. Stating this, I was wondering if anyone has any tips or critiques of my workout plan.

First: I plan on starting off slowly, avoiding heavy weights and hard workouts. In the past, I have done a hard workout in the beginning and afterwards was too sore to do any more working out for a week. This caused me to get lazy and stop my workout routine. So, for the first week, probably it will consist of running a half a mile and swimming somewhere around 500 yards. To get my muscles attuned to the idea of weights, I will do non-weight muscle toning exercises (such as push-ups, pull-ups, dips and so on...)

Once the first week is over, I will get into the real routine.

-Monday: Aerobics: Running a distance, and sprinting one lap for time.

Weights: A focus on back and shoulders (Lat pull-downs, wide pull-ups, etc.)

-Tuesday: Swimming with intervals

Ab wheel (it works wonders :-P)

-Wednesday: Running

Weights: Arms (curls, Triceps extension, etc.)

-Thursday: Swimming

Ab Wheel

-Friday: Running

Weights: Chest and legs

-Saturday and Sunday: Rest, Stretching, etc.

Any comments would be greatly appreciated!! :-D

My two cents would be to decide exactly what your objectives are and tailor your workouts accordingly.

So if it's aerobic fitness, then do aerobics, if it is increased strength, then low rep relatively heavy weights etc.

One thing that is vital however, it's not the training per se that gets you fitter, stronger etc. It's your body's subsequent adaptation from the stress that exercise creates. So it is vital to rest adequately and allow recovery to occur.

It seems you do not understand how the human body works nor makes adjustments to stressors. Do you actually think that you can train the heart without trianing the muscle, what is it that you think puts the demand on the heart? Push the muscle to it's limit and all the sub-systems will make adjustments in correlation to the muscle, to include the heart. Forty years ago Dr. Cooper put forth his illogical idea about "aerobics" training and people have been jumping in behind him ever since. First off, aerobic is a metabolic pathway that deals with oxygen, and the most aerobic thing you or any other human could do is sleep.

I have discussed all this before in other threads and I will end by pointing out that that is where those that care might begin.

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This summer, once school is out, I am going to start a workout routine and diet program; being as I have become completely out of shape. Stating this, I was wondering if anyone has any tips or critiques of my workout plan...

Looks good to me. I was 50lbs overweight when I graduated college. Even more than starting an exercise routine, I changed my diet. Switched to Diet Coke, stopped eating candy, sweets, baked goods, etc (went through sugar withdrawal!). And the weight literally melted off of me. I'm more of a runner than a weight-lifter, but if you want to tone up and develop muscles, I think it starts with "feeding" them first: add more protein and complex carbs, and get rid of the junk.

Good luck!

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This summer, once school is out, I am going to start a workout routine and diet program; being as I have become completely out of shape. Stating this, I was wondering if anyone has any tips or critiques of my workout plan.

First: I plan on starting off slowly, avoiding heavy weights and hard workouts. In the past, I have done a hard workout in the beginning and afterwards was too sore to do any more working out for a week. This caused me to get lazy and stop my workout routine. So, for the first week, probably it will consist of running a half a mile and swimming somewhere around 500 yards. To get my muscles attuned to the idea of weights, I will do non-weight muscle toning exercises (such as push-ups, pull-ups, dips and so on...)

Once the first week is over, I will get into the real routine.

-Monday: Aerobics: Running a distance, and sprinting one lap for time.

Weights: A focus on back and shoulders (Lat pull-downs, wide pull-ups, etc.)

-Tuesday: Swimming with intervals

Ab wheel (it works wonders :-P)

-Wednesday: Running

Weights: Arms (curls, Triceps extension, etc.)

-Thursday: Swimming

Ab Wheel

-Friday: Running

Weights: Chest and legs

-Saturday and Sunday: Rest, Stretching, etc.

Any comments would be greatly appreciated!! :-D

My two cents would be to decide exactly what your objectives are and tailor your workouts accordingly.

So if it's aerobic fitness, then do aerobics, if it is increased strength, then low rep relatively heavy weights etc.

One thing that is vital however, it's not the training per se that gets you fitter, stronger etc. It's your body's subsequent adaptation from the stress that exercise creates. So it is vital to rest adequately and allow recovery to occur.

It seems you do not understand how the human body works nor makes adjustments to stressors. Do you actually think that you can train the heart without trianing the muscle, what is it that you think puts the demand on the heart? Push the muscle to it's limit and all the sub-systems will make adjustments in correlation to the muscle, to include the heart. Forty years ago Dr. Cooper put forth his illogical idea about "aerobics" training and people have been jumping in behind him ever since. First off, aerobic is a metabolic pathway that deals with oxygen, and the most aerobic thing you or any other human could do is sleep.

I have discussed all this before in other threads and I will end by pointing out that that is where those that care might begin.

I stand by the logic that says if you want to be better at running, run and if you want to be bigger and stronger, lift weights for relatively low reps, for a limited duration and rest adequately between workouts.

I further stand by the logic that says if you want to lose bodyfat, then sessions of aerobic type work such as running, cycling etc, for 45 minutes to 1 hour can be highly effective in pursuit of this goal. This is not the only way to achieve the goal, but it clearly works.

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I further stand by the logic that says if you want to lose bodyfat, then sessions of aerobic type work such as running, cycling etc, for 45 minutes to 1 hour can be highly effective in pursuit of this goal. This is not the only way to achieve the goal, but it clearly works.

Why though? This is probably the most inefficient way to lose fat. Why exercise for an hour several days a week when you could have achieved the same result by simply eating a little less every day.

Why waste your time doing aerobics when you could lift weights once a week for 15-20 minutes, then simply eat less food every day?

It takes probably less than two minutes to eat a snickers, yet to undue the calories from it you would have to jog two miles at a pretty brisk pace (and once again, not all calories burned will even be fat). This fact alone shows that exercising to lose fat is going the wrong way about it, because your body is so dang efficient it is going to make the ordeal a struggle for you. Cut it off at the source: eat less calories.

You do not workout to lose fat: you workout (weights) to alter your body so that you can lose fat in between workouts (combined with proper eating habits). I only exercise probably once every two weeks, and that is when I lift weights, yet my metabolism is through the roof: I have to eat literally six meals a day (small ones though), and yet I can still lose fat while doing this.

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I further stand by the logic that says if you want to lose bodyfat, then sessions of aerobic type work such as running, cycling etc, for 45 minutes to 1 hour can be highly effective in pursuit of this goal. This is not the only way to achieve the goal, but it clearly works.

Why though? This is probably the most inefficient way to lose fat. Why exercise for an hour several days a week when you could have achieved the same result by simply eating a little less every day.

Because it's very hard to eat 'a little less every day' for some of us. :D
Why waste your time doing aerobics when you could lift weights once a week for 15-20 minutes, then simply eat less food every day?
I have found, in the past, that 20-30' 3 days a week of aerobics, while initially increasing appetite, soon regulates it. It is not just the calories burned in an aerobic session, or what you say would be absolutely 100% correct. It is also an appetite suppressant, in my experience. It also changes what I prefer to eat. In my experience, when I'm working out, salad looks good to me; when I'm not working out, cake looks good to me.
...You do not workout to lose fat: you workout (weights) to alter your body so that you can lose fat in between workouts (combined with proper eating habits). I only exercise probably once every two weeks, and that is when I lift weights, yet my metabolism is through the roof: I have to eat literally six meals a day (small ones though), and yet I can still lose fat while doing this.
May I ask your age? I said almost the identical thing 20 years ago, when my metabolism was through the roof and a workout a week got me looking like the musculature chart in Grey's Anatomy (the book, not the tv show).

Also, you are a martial artist. How can you say that you only exercise every other week? If you're training a few times a week, that's hard physical work. Ju Jitsu?? You gotta be kidding me if you're not including that in your exercise regimen. I'm nowhere near as accomplished as you appear to be based on your posts, but I spent about a year in Tae Kwan Do, some Krav Maga, 6 months of kick boxing, and a couple years in Judo and I've never been in as good shape in terms of flexibility and strength.

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I further stand by the logic that says if you want to lose bodyfat, then sessions of aerobic type work such as running, cycling etc, for 45 minutes to 1 hour can be highly effective in pursuit of this goal. This is not the only way to achieve the goal, but it clearly works.

Why though? This is probably the most inefficient way to lose fat. Why exercise for an hour several days a week when you could have achieved the same result by simply eating a little less every day.

Why waste your time doing aerobics when you could lift weights once a week for 15-20 minutes, then simply eat less food every day?

It takes probably less than two minutes to eat a snickers, yet to undue the calories from it you would have to jog two miles at a pretty brisk pace (and once again, not all calories burned will even be fat). This fact alone shows that exercising to lose fat is going the wrong way about it, because your body is so dang efficient it is going to make the ordeal a struggle for you. Cut it off at the source: eat less calories.

You do not workout to lose fat: you workout (weights) to alter your body so that you can lose fat in between workouts (combined with proper eating habits). I only exercise probably once every two weeks, and that is when I lift weights, yet my metabolism is through the roof: I have to eat literally six meals a day (small ones though), and yet I can still lose fat while doing this.

Well the cardiac benefits of aerobic exercise seem to be well documented, and you can only do so much weight training. Also lifting weight sends my appetite skyward whereas aerobics really doesn't.

And I have this ghastly congested commute ging into London, so if I get out of bed really early, I can beat the traffic but I'm at work about two and a half hours early, so some aerobics, a sauna and a subsequent shower is a nice way to start the day.

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Thank you everyone for all the ideas! I apologize for not responding sooner, finals essentially consumed my life for the past few days.

One thing in particular I found interesting, only because the same happens to me.

I have found, in the past, that 20-30' 3 days a week of aerobics, while initially increasing appetite, soon regulates it. It is not just the calories burned in an aerobic session, or what you say would be absolutely 100% correct. It is also an appetite suppressant, in my experience. It also changes what I prefer to eat. In my experience, when I'm working out, salad looks good to me; when I'm not working out, cake looks good to me.

In my life, I have found I snacked a lot less when my life included working out.

One thing I have noticed in my life, is that running burns fat; but that is all it accomplishes. It does not build muscle what-so-ever. So, if you would want a well sculpted body, running by itself is not sufficient, but if you are just looking to burn a couple of pounds, running is very good for that.

One of the workouts I found really interesting is the workout used for the movie 300.

25x Pull-up +

50x Deadlift @ 135# +

50x Push-up +

50x Box Jump @ 24” box +

50x Floor Wiper @ 135# (one-count) +

50x KB Clean and Press @ 36# (KB must touch floor between reps) +

25x Pull-up

300 reps total

http://www.gymjones.com/knowledge.php?id=35

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Also, you are a martial artist. How can you say that you only exercise every other week? If you're training a few times a week, that's hard physical work. Ju Jitsu?? You gotta be kidding me if you're not including that in your exercise regimen. I'm nowhere near as accomplished as you appear to be based on your posts, but I spent about a year in Tae Kwan Do, some Krav Maga, 6 months of kick boxing, and a couple years in Judo and I've never been in as good shape in terms of flexibility and strength.

As a quick reply, in another thread I mentioned I stopped training at the local Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu academy about eight months ago because the school had lost its integrity. So since all I've been doing is lifting weights ever 1 1/2 to 2 weeks. This summer and fall I will be back to training regularly (because I am moving).

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One of the workouts I found really interesting is the workout used for the movie 300.
25x Pull-up +

50x Deadlift @ 135# +

50x Push-up +

50x Box Jump @ 24” box +

50x Floor Wiper @ 135# (one-count) +

50x KB Clean and Press @ 36# (KB must touch floor between reps) +

25x Pull-up

300 reps total

http://www.gymjones.com/knowledge.php?id=35

You will also need immaculate genetics to look like those actors!

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You will also need immaculate genetics to look like those actors!

Not me - I have a top-notch CGI team. sorcerer.gif

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I ask your age? I said almost the identical thing 20 years ago, when my metabolism was through the roof and a workout a week got me looking like the musculature chart in Grey's Anatomy (the book, not the tv show).

23. My metabolism was much slower several years ago, even when I was training Jiu-Jitsu several days a week. My metabolism picked up once I started high-intensity weight training combined with Ray's recommended diet (300-500 calorie meals every 3-5 hours).

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Well the cardiac benefits of aerobic exercise seem to be well documented
I would need a really well done study before I would accept this. Of course any exercise vs no exercise has to be healthier for your heart, my question is to what degree aerobics actually helps. (and also, every other month it seems like something new is cited in a study as being good for you)
...and you can only do so much weight training.
I don't understand the significance of this... this is the good thing about weight lifting, you only need to do it 15 minutes a week to enjoy all sorts of benefits (higher metabolism, higher testosterone levels, greater bone-density, stronger ligaments, stronger joints, higher energy levels, etc.)
Also lifting weight sends my appetite skyward whereas aerobics really doesn't.
If anything I'd say appetite suppression is bad. If you aren't eating where is your body going to get the calories? (it won't just be the fat) Having your appetite sent skyward is no big deal, just eat smaller meals, and eat them slowly. It really isn't a matter of great will power or ignoring your hunger pains; if you eat slowly, and pause for maybe five minutes after eating 300-500 calories, the feeling of hunger will go away. Your hunger response is slow to change, and because of that people easily eat much more than they nutritionally need.

I think eating smaller meals is fun. I can go to a fancy restaurant, get a big meal, eat half of it and take the rest home for a second meal!

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23.

23?!?! Sweet Jesus on a pogo stick, don't talk to me about your slow metabolism! Maybe when you're ageBlurred.gif yeas old like me, but until then fuggedaboudit!

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I've lost 20 pounds of fat since November, putting me back in the thin category. For me it was pretty much just cutting calories and fat from the diet. I was eating too many snacks and having too much friend food. I was also doing push-ups and crunches and walking more. It's still going to take more work to get the flat abs I want, but there's just only so much I'm willing to do. hehe I do feel better than I have in years, though.

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23.

23?!?! Sweet Jesus on a pogo stick, don't talk to me about your slow metabolism! Maybe when you're ageBlurred.gif yeas old like me, but until then fuggedaboudit!

post-47-1210035042.gifI rest my case (for a minute, then I'll deadlift it 12 more times). At 23, if you're a type A, your metabolism is at hummingbird levels. I had that kind of metabolism. I had no formal workout until my mid-30's. I know from personal experience though that, sometime in the early 40's, ones metabolism just drops wayyy down. Even in my late 30's, I could eat whatever I wanted and my body would just burn it off. I was always active, but just bobbing my knee seemed to be enough to stay thin. I thought that all fat people must just be completely lazy and self-destructive, it was so damned easy to keep weight off. At ageBlurred.gif (thanks, piz, for the Rorscharch age spot), I know better. After ageBlurred.gif-10, whatever I ate became one with me. A regular workout, at least 2-3 days a week, is essential, or I end up with a pot belly. That includes a brisk 30' walk every day or two, so it's not the 300 workout, but my body is no longer the furnace it was. Up thru my 30's, I was apparently working out standing still. I didn't understand the concept of belly fat.

As far as the "aerobics: useless or great" argument, I actually agree with high-intensity training to some extent and I've followed that approach in the past. I'm a believer in resistance training. Pull-ups and dips have rarely been out of my exercise plan. Those two are a complete upper-body workout in themselves. I agree with Josh (and Carlos) that Aerobics by themselves will not build you up. Muscle burns calories standing still. Running burns muscle as well as fat and who wants to look like a bunch of pipe cleaners? And it's murder on the joints. But there are balanced options. I am currently doing a higher-rep calisthenic regimen, lately and I like the functional aspect: Good flexibility, strength and stamina improve, can be done in the nooks and crannies of my day. I do hindu pushups, back bridges, pull-ups, and a quick mix of other stuff.

For a balanced anaerobic/aerobic workout, the kick-boxing regimen I did ca. 10 years ago for 6 months was probably the fastest I've ever gotten in shape of my life. It was 2-3 days/wk, with a heavy bag, for a little over and hour, at Bodies in Motion. I was shrinking and toning so fast I could see a daily change. It felt fantastic. But that's a hard routine to keep up, unless you have a club like that next door (I did at the time - I was working next door).

I think it really does come down to what you enjoy doing; and what you can maintain in your life. The HIT approach does allow you to spend less time exercising. That's a huge benefit. But it doesn't do as much for the cardiovascular system as higher reps/lower weights.

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My goal is definitely not to bulk up (I have more than enough strength and size) but to drop pounds and build stamina. I was never much for running long distances, but I adore 4+ hour bike rides (though I haven't done that for years now). When I was on the track team in school I was a sprinter. As far as I was concerned anyone who ran more than 200 meters (220 yards in those days :D) was a lunatic - I absolutely hated distance workouts. Then again, on the basketball team I could run up and down the court all day and not even notice it.

So, given the goals of losing weight and building stamina, will the high-intensity weight training work? The answer seems to be "yes" for pounds and "not yet given" for endurance.

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Everyone here has made good points especially about individual differences and the changes due to age, type of exercise, and diet.

In my own case, I was an always-in-action Type A who ate beef, pork, fish, fruits, and vegetables by the pound and never gained an ounce. Somewhere around 35 or so I slowed down to a Type A-, started eating bread and pasta, and began gaining weight. I dieted -- which I hated -- and lost weight, but gained it back and then some. An hour a day of aerobics at the gym or walking didn't seem to make much difference.

About a year ago I started doing 20 minutes a week of resistance weight training similar to RayK's system. I am not dieting at all. I eat what I am hungry for when I feel like it and as much as I want. It just seems that I don't want bread or pasta any more.

Since then I have lost thirty pounds and am continuing to lose about a half pound per week and I've gone from a size 18 to an 8/10. It works for me!

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23.

23?!?! Sweet Jesus on a pogo stick, don't talk to me about your slow metabolism! Maybe when you're ageBlurred.gif yeas old like me, but until then fuggedaboudit!

post-47-1210035042.gifI rest my case

I don't understand the point. When I was 16 I ate literally all I possibly could, and never gained a pound, but now if I do that I will put on weight pretty easily. My metabolism had been lower than it was now, then it increased substantially when I did HIT and proper diet. Why are the effects of HIT and proper diet nullified just because of my age? The point is to look at how you yourself change, not to compare yourself to others at that age or something like that.

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