Betsy Speicher

Never Back Down (2008)

Rate this movie   1 vote

  1. 1. Artistic Merit

    • 10
      0
    • 9
      0
    • 8
      0
    • 7
      1
    • 6
      0
    • 5
      0
    • 4
      0
    • 3
      0
    • 2
      0
    • 1
      0
    • 0
      0
  2. 2. Sense of Life or Personal Value

    • 10
      0
    • 9
      0
    • 8
      1
    • 7
      0
    • 6
      0
    • 5
      0
    • 4
      0
    • 3
      0
    • 2
      0
    • 1
      0
    • 0
      0

Please sign in or register to vote in this poll.

5 posts in this topic

While this review is "too late" in the sense that the movie is out of the theatres, I believe a small-screen viewing will prove valuable still.

The plot is not complex, and there is a moral loose end left untied towards the film's close. There is also a slightly "Fast and the Furious" look-and-feel (which I don't mind really). But, none of this will matter once you get into it.

The script is quite Romantic, with passionate and motivated characters; the dialogue is quite essentialized; and the values being fought for, are fully real. The young lead actor, in my view, should have played Superman in the recent Superman Returns disappointment. His antagonist is well played by the exceptionally-magnetic Cam Gigandet. Rounding out the cast is the immovable Djimon Hounsou who plays a mysterious martial arts teacher.

In any case, production values aside, the moral lesson I took from this film is to choose your fights carefully, but also to never give up fighting. It's not a matter of there being too much to lose, but rather that there's too much to win.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
While this review is "too late" in the sense that the movie is out of the theatres, I believe a small-screen viewing will prove valuable still.

The plot is not complex, and there is a moral loose end left untied towards the film's close. There is also a slightly "Fast and the Furious" look-and-feel (which I don't mind really). But, none of this will matter once you get into it.

The script is quite Romantic, with passionate and motivated characters; the dialogue is quite essentialized; and the values being fought for, are fully real. The young lead actor, in my view, should have played Superman in the recent Superman Returns disappointment. His antagonist is well played by the exceptionally-magnetic Cam Gigandet. Rounding out the cast is the immovable Djimon Hounsou who plays a mysterious martial arts teacher.

In any case, production values aside, the moral lesson I took from this film is to choose your fights carefully, but also to never give up fighting. It's not a matter of there being too much to lose, but rather that there's too much to win.

I appreciate you posting this. I no longer go to the theatre because I finally figured out I have a missing chemical and can't watch movies without the subtitles turned on. My hearing is fine, my brain just doesn't process info quick enough. I compensate by reading lips. Unfortunately the way they have sped up the pace of movies, I can't catch it all. It drives me crazy if I think I've missed a clue because I couldn't hear/comprehend what was being said. For example in the last James Bond movie, Bond makes a remark to a man whose car he had parked earlier. Obviously it was impromptu because it didn't appear on the subtitles. I back it up 3 times and still couldn't figure out what the remark was - because he moves his head just as he says it and I can't see his mouth. It can be so frustrating!

If you wondering what point I'm trying to make, it is that I seem to enjoy all the recommendations you make and try to make note so I watch it as soon as it's released on DVD, so it doesn't bother me if your rec comes late.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I appreciate you posting this. I no longer go to the theatre because I finally figured out I have a missing chemical and can't watch movies without the subtitles turned on. My hearing is fine, my brain just doesn't process info quick enough. I compensate by reading lips. Unfortunately the way they have sped up the pace of movies, I can't catch it all. It drives me crazy if I think I've missed a clue because I couldn't hear/comprehend what was being said. For example in the last James Bond movie, Bond makes a remark to a man whose car he had parked earlier. Obviously it was impromptu because it didn't appear on the subtitles. I back it up 3 times and still couldn't figure out what the remark was - because he moves his head just as he says it and I can't see his mouth. It can be so frustrating!

As an aside, I emphatically agree with you about this. It has been a sore point with me for many years. Incomprehensibility is no substitute for depth; I don't want to have to struggle understanding sense data, instead of plots. One should not have to strain to put together what one watches. Give me the voice overs, maps and subtitles which explain context.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I appreciate you posting this. I no longer go to the theatre because I finally figured out I have a missing chemical and can't watch movies without the subtitles turned on. My hearing is fine, my brain just doesn't process info quick enough. I compensate by reading lips. Unfortunately the way they have sped up the pace of movies, I can't catch it all. It drives me crazy if I think I've missed a clue because I couldn't hear/comprehend what was being said. For example in the last James Bond movie, Bond makes a remark to a man whose car he had parked earlier. Obviously it was impromptu because it didn't appear on the subtitles. I back it up 3 times and still couldn't figure out what the remark was - because he moves his head just as he says it and I can't see his mouth. It can be so frustrating!

As my range and taste in movies have widened and grown, I've come to very much appreciate this point you make. There is a scene in Batman Begins (a favorite of mine) where the lead actor, Christian Bale, mutters something I never caught in the 7 or so times I'd seen the movie - even on DVD - only for a work-friend of mine to tell me, a couple of months ago, what Bale said. My friend had watched the film with headphones on.

But, anytime I watch a Hitchcock movie (e.g., Rear Window, Rope, Vertigo), or a Sam Bronston movie (El Cid, The Fall of the Roman Empire) or a Robert Benton movie (The Human Stain, Feast Of Love) or a Robert Redford movie (Ordinary People, A River Runs Through It, Lions For Lambs), I notice how little work my ears have to do but how much my mind has to. I may be wrong, but films made before the 1980s, or in the style of those days, seem to be more demanding intellectually and less demanding sensorily.

Watching Ben-Hur sometime ago, I remarked to someone that these kinds of films required patient viewing but were bestsellers when released, and what did that say about the kind of moviegoer in America then versus the moviegoer today? I quickly reminded myself that American moviegoers responded favorably to Gladiator -- a very intelligent script almost hobbled by modern production excesses. So, that put paid to my hasty generalization.

If you wondering what point I'm trying to make, it is that I seem to enjoy all the recommendations you make and try to make note so I watch it as soon as it's released on DVD, so it doesn't bother me if your rec comes late.

The pleasure is all mine, Lady Brin. I am very grateful for your audience.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites