Tito

Happy Autistic Pride Day!

21 posts in this topic

I couldn't get past the first sentence. Literally couldn't read past this:

Autistic Pride Day is a celebration of the neurodiversity of people on the autism spectrum on June 18 each year.

"Neurodiversity?" Oh brother*...

___

*In case you haven't already figured it out, whenever I say "Oh brother," please be sure to read it as "WHAT THE Fcensored.gif?!?!"

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Oh, for god's sake! My sister is autistic and it's nothing to be "proud" of; it's drastically limited her life and gave my parents no end of grief and frustration trying to help her function.

Autism is a syndrome, I don't care what the clinical 'experts' say. They have a collection of symptoms, not a clear and uncontested, unambiguous cause. In my sister's case, the mind is good, but she's seemingly incapable of automatizing social behavior; the entire analysis of what was said, what was probably meant or felt, what she should do about it is a loud public rumination, for just one example. She is physically uncomfortable being touched by another person; it's as if it gave her an electric shock. There's some serious wiring defect there.

The "high-functioning" autistics, like Professor Temple Grandin, who does university work in animal husbandry and must give herself 'hugs' with a wooden contraption she built, are a huge exception. She accepts that she has 'issues.' My sister really has no idea that there's anything wrong with her.

I'd love to see a cure, but that's difficult until they really understand the defect or defects causing the condition (or conditions). One thing that is just radically unhelpful is this idiotic egalitarian pretense that such a person is 'differently abled' and we should respect and celebrate an organic disability like this, rather than try to characterize and mitigate or cure it. This is an admission of failure, rather a celebration of failure, repackaged as a virtue.

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Leaving out the philosophical objections I have with most of these "* pride" campaigns. The psychological and cultural changes that many undertake to make are valid and valuable. I agree that having autism is nothing to be proud of. But as long as one is as productive as one is capable of becoming it certainly is nothing to be ashamed of.

Further, autism is not failure. Failure denotes a value that one is striving to achieve and is subsequently not successfully achieved. I agree it is not a virtue, but it certainly isn't evil either.

I would also add that it is probably to Autistics that hear words all their life such as grief, frustration, defective, failure; that such a campaign is aimed, as well as the people who utter those words or suggest in their deeds and actions about Autistics.

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Further, autism is not failure.

I think this is a reference to a statement by alann; if so, you misread it. The ones failing are those who ought to be working to understand and fix autism rather than pretending it's ok.

This is not unique to autism. There are actually those who *actively* work against cochlear implants which can give deaf people some very useful hearing ability; not perfect but way better than nothing. The activists work against it because they're pro "deaf culture", which blatantly exposes the evil of those people.

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If that is what is meant: statement retracted, and apologies to alann.

Agreement with the anti-anti-cure culture... definitely.

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Neurodiversity is an evil movement.

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Neurodiversity is an evil movement.

LOL! Interesting statement.

I have a son who is an Aspie, and I, for, one, am not celebrating. He is one of the most miserable people I know. He's always angry because he can't or won't do what "the rest of us" do, and is totally self defeating. It's exhausting getting him to accomplish the slightest task. We have to bribe him every step of the way. The only things he's interested in are video games and junk food, which he's allergic to. Oh, and football.

I keep hoping that some day, some lightbulb will go off and he will do things just for the sake of doing them, because they are right.

I really wonder who came up w/the idea for Autistic Pride Day. I realize that some are higher functioning, and don't want to be looked down on, but it is a neurological deficit and makes life very difficult. If you're lucky enough to have the savant portion, you're lucky indeed.

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Neurodiversity is an evil movement.

Why? There are folks whose brains and nervous systems work differently from yours because of genetic factors. Autism and its high functioning manifestation Asperger Syndrome have a genetic basis.

There is a rather high concentration of Aspergarians in the computer software business, because they are will adapted and inclined to produce software. It is a rule based activity, which is the sweet spot for Aspergarians. The most dense concentration of Auties and Aspies in the U.S. is found in Silicone Valley.

I am not sure where pride comes in. Is there a left handed pride movement? Or a blonde hair pride movement? Pride does not make too much sense here. A condition is a condition, particularly a genetically based condition.

Bob Kolker

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I have a son who is an Aspie, and I, for, one, am not celebrating. He is one of the most miserable people I know. He's always angry because he can't or won't do what "the rest of us" do, and is totally self defeating. It's exhausting getting him to accomplish the slightest task. We have to bribe him every step of the way. The only things he's interested in are video games and junk food, which he's allergic to. Oh, and football.

I have a story that is both good news and bad news for you. I am an Old Aspie (73 years old). I was born before the condition even had a name (the name, Asperger Syndrome was produced in 1944 based on the work of a German doctor, Dr. Asperger). My childhood wasn't easy since divergent behavior was less tolerated in the 1940s than it is now. It was rough. That is the bad news.

The good news is that I learned to adapt to the majority neurotypical world (like I had a choice?). I was able to learn neurotypical patterns of behavior by empirical means, rather than intuitively as normals do. Eventually I learned to conform my external behavior to the neurotypical modalities and life became easier for me. I am so well adapted now, I pass for normal without breathing hard. I like to compare my experience to learning how to paint by the numbers. The main difference is I had to figure out the numbers by myself.

I married a neurotypical (we are married now 53 years) and most of our children are neurotypical. My oldest son is probably an Aspie but he too, is well adapted now and gets along fine. So the good news is Aspies can learn to exist in a neurotypical society with some effort on their part. For autistics on the low end of the functionality spectrum, the news is not so good. They are at a definite disadvantage, having substandard linguistic ability. They need extra help.

Give your child the support he needs. If he is bright, he will learn how to cope eventually. He will experience difficulty, but if things go right for him, the difficulty will lessen over time. If you can get him involved in a rule based activity (like computer programming) he should pick it up and the accomplishment will give him the pride he needs.

When I was your son's age there were few computers. So I learned mathematics (I taught myself calculus at age 13). My parents were very supportive and got me text books and had the math folks at the local state college provide me with some work and problems to do. My peers considered me a geek and I was well shunned, but I did not care because I had theorems to prove and problems to solve. My Dad (may he rest in peace) actually considered my condition as a gift rather than a problem and encouraged me accordingly.

Keep your hopes up. All is not lost.

Bob Kolker

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Hi Bob, nice to meet you.

Based on my mere 12 yrs of experience w/my son, I doubt that he has the motivation or wherewithal for self direction (as compared to you, for example). I can only wish he were the geeky type.

I haven't given up totally. I can't. I'm his mother. But some days, I wonder what would happen if I just disappeared.

BTW, my son hates math. He hates writing. He's actually very verbal. But he has no imagination. He almost never dreams. He's had only one nightmare in his life.

The rule-based activities in which he excels at the moment are baseball, football, and basketball. It could be worse. -_-

I have sat down on a few occasions and made faces so that my son can identify different expressions and moods. He has improved quite a bit in that area. I am always clarifying puns, plays on words, and expressions. But he still has his own "rules" in his mind, and loudly shouts whenever someone breaks them. For example, if I change the menu for dinner because I forgot to thaw out something, he'll shout, "You lied!"

Yesterday I told him that he could finish his book report in an hr after football practice. He insisted it would take longer, and instead of reasoning it out by how fast he types, how quickly he researches, etc. he merely screamed at me, "LIAR!"

He is on medication for anxiety and depression, which takes the edge off, but he still overreacts to "pressure" or expectations, so it's going to be a long road.

You are to be commended on your diligence, clarity, and tenacity.

I'll back Autism Awareness Day, but I'm still not thrilled about Autistic Pride Day. -_-

BTW, I noticed on one of the autism threads, that someone said that most parents would get upset if you used the expression, "I didn't sign up for this." I may be one exception. We adopted our son when he was 2 days old. We had no idea what was in store for us. I cannot tell you how many times I have said, "I didn't sign up for this!"

Thank you for the support.

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One more thing--I saw a thread on ADHD. That was our first sign that something was different about our son. He broke every single toy he was ever given, lost or destroyed numerous decks of cards, games and toys. He ripped clothing, knocked over chairs, destroyed so many things that we had to constantly monitor him, lock up dangerous tools or kitchen implements. Only in the past 3 yrs have I been able to sit down and play board games with him. So many years, lost. But I can only look forward, or at least, live in the moment, so I don't get depressed. ADHD can be a symptom of Asperger's, bipolar, or schizoaffective disorder. If only we know what to look for ...

I don't know if you were ADHD as a child, but since you probably ran around outside more than kids today do, your energy was probably put to good use. -_-

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Terry I hope you feel some support from this Forum, because you have a sad burden to deal with. For what it is worth, you have my sympathy.

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Terry I hope you feel some support from this Forum, because you have a sad burden to deal with. For what it is worth, you have my sympathy.

Thank you, Arnold. This board is lively, interesting, usually filled with reason and reasonable discussions, and there is a lot of variety. Every little bit helps.

Terry

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My son has autism. Sure, autism has a genetic component. So does cancer.

I say that neurodiversity cranks are evil because they don't know what they're talking about. Being a functional person with Asperger's isn't the same thing as running back and forth with your fists clenched in the air all day, grunting like a savage and biting your friends. Anybody who would celebrate that this is happening to our children at a growing rate is out of touch with reality....to the point of being evil.

I've learned more about autism than any father would ever hope to know. I'm an engineer who happened to be working with one of the finest teams of environmental scientists at the time my son was diagnosed. I had many biological tests run on my son and his parents and researched this a great deal. I've addressed the National Institute on Health on this. I've been involved with the Mind Institute.

The first step to a solution is recognizing that there's a problem. The neurodiversity squad squashes that first step. By celebrating a disorder that tortures children I think they're as low as you can go. They are the morons in this story.

I think that somebody does great with Asperger's or any other part of the spectrum is wonderful. I'll be the first to celebrate that person, but won't celebrate autism. My son, through the application of what I've learned about the biomedical aspects of autism (something denied by many "experts" who receive funding from Big Pharma) and behavioral therapy is making a terrific recovery. I can use the word "recovery" because at 15 months he became catatonic; completely shut down from ANY social interraction. Now, he's most of the way back. A film crew came over from Iceland to film my son as he was in the midst of a recovery that continues to brighten our lives. I understand he'll be featured in the documentary soon.

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My son, through the application of what I've learned about the biomedical aspects of autism (something denied by many "experts" who receive funding from Big Pharma) and behavioral therapy is making a terrific recovery. I can use the word "recovery" because at 15 months he became catatonic; completely shut down from ANY social interraction. Now, he's most of the way back. A film crew came over from Iceland to film my son as he was in the midst of a recovery that continues to brighten our lives. I understand he'll be featured in the documentary soon.

Your dedication to your son and his recovery are inspiring. I wish your family well and hope that what you have discovered can help other families too.

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Reading this reminds me of my childhood and the difficulty I had existing with 'normal' people. Like Bob, my childhood was before things like ADHD and Autism were widely-known, and I spent a lot of time in 'alternative' school programs and tutoring because I couldn't function in a classroom situation.

Socially, I was a disaster. I went almost an entire lifetime without dating. Being born with mild Treacher-Collins syndrome didn't help and I didn't get married until after retirement, at which time I travelled to Asia and met my betrothed.

Now we have a daughter, and she's been diagnosed as being on the Autistic spectrum. She was quite normal until age 13 months. Then we took her for routine checkup and vaccinations. She had four shots that day. Within 2 weeks of that doctor visit, she stopped talking and became unmanageable with feeding and potty training. It took a year and a half for her to regain speech abilities, and she spoke mostly a random collection of unrelated words and sounds--gibberish.

At age 4, we decided to start her in daycare, because she had zero exposure to kids her age at home. That's when the Autism word first came up. At their suggestion, we enrolled her in an Excel program (she qualified by tests the school performed) and she has made tremendous gains. She is now attending special ed in the morning and kindergarten in the afternoon, at age 5. I think part of her problem is a lack of parental attention on our part, as the wife works 12 hour night shifts and I'm struggling to eek out a bare existence of a business and sometimes have to travel away from home. Since she's been in the care of public schools, she's doing much better.

At the moment, her main problems are a severe aversion to food. She won't touch icecream, pizza, meat or vegetables. The only thing she likes to eat is animal crackers, cake and cookies and, oddly, Tilapia with tomato sauce. Getting her to eat anything the rest of the family eats evokes a reaction as if we were force-feeding her raw sewage, literally. She'll scream as if being dismembered if we force her to eat. If we force-feed her, she'll spit the food out.

Similar goes for potty training, though we hit a milestone last week, getting her to learn the habit of sitting on the toilet 15 minutes a day after supper. Prior to that, she would refuse to go for a week or more, until she was so impacted that we had to use suppositories to free things up. Gradually even that stopped working, along with Miralax and other laxitives that the pediatrician recommended. But thankfully that is improving. I was about to take her to a specialist to find out if there was a physiological problem with her intestines.

In other respects, she is doing fairly well, but I think she is 18 months behind her peers. She doesn't like the things that typical girls like. She's into dinosaurs and reptiles. She can rattle off names like dilaphisaurus and tyrranosarus rex with ease, but sometimes she still doesn't 'get' simple questions. She is starting to recognize letters of the alphabet now and is enamoured with the letter 'y' at the moment, picking it out from computer text, adverts, labels, whereever she finds words in print, and commenting "there's a 'y'!" Her favorite movies are Jurassic Park (she replays the scene where the fat guy is trying to unstuck the jeep and gets spat on by a dilaphisaurus), Dinosaur and Jaws. Anything with a mouth and teeth fascinates her.

Getting back to me, it took me forty some-odd years to reach a level of maturity where I could function somewhat in life. I was always slow to grasp situations. I tried sales and found out I could not counter-argue customer objections to proposals, so I never succeeded in sales. I usually ended up with menial task jobs or low end bench tech jobs, after flunking out of high school. I could never grasp Algebra for some reason. Simple equations, yes, but once it got beyond the most basic level of complexity, my eyes would glaze over and that would be the end of further learning. Math gets me a lot of grief even now. It takes me two whole months to figure out my taxes each year, and that's with the help of software! I had difficulty keeping a job, as I was always a slow worker and didn't perform well under pressure-inducing production type jobs in factory environments. I have an intolerance of heat, and most everywhere I worked it was about ten degrees hotter than I could handle, so I was always nauseated and sick all day and would come home with a splitting headache every night.

I tried going to college one year, but handling work and college proved too much. I had to choose between employment and education and really the only choice was to keep my job, so I dropped the college.

Now I'm struggling in the most unneeded profession of all, videography, competing against a hundred million people with $179 camcorders, trying to make a living doing weddings and other events. My business expenses this year were $21,000. I grossed just shy of $4,000 in invoices. But at least I'm doing what I enjoy, after a lifetime of hating every minute of my day jobs. The last three businesses I ran all went bankrupt. As a Typesetter, I was soon made irrelevant by the Mac computer. As a color prepress designer, more of the same. As a radio engineering consultant, by deregulation (no more requirement to keep an engineer employed). So now I'm trying my hand at something I should have gone into half a century ago. I am finally realizing it's content, not service, that is the key. But it always takes me about 8-10 years to figure things out and then the rules change, making my line of work irrelevant to society. You see, I'm a bit slow.

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Perhaps this is already known to the parents who posted here but just in case it is not I would like to bring their attention to the work of

Dr Mary Megson relating to cod liver oil and other vitamins supplementation for autism and psychological disorders.

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Yesterday there was a fascinating and enlightening three-hour interview with Temple Grandin. Ms. Grandin is high-functioning autistic person herself and has written ten books dealing with autism, what it is, and how to help an autistic person overcome their difficulties and lead a happy and successful life.

You can watch the video here.

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Yesterday there was a fascinating and enlightening three-hour interview with Temple Grandin. Ms. Grandin is high-functioning autistic person herself and has written ten books dealing with autism, what it is, and how to help an autistic person overcome their difficulties and lead a happy and successful life.

You can watch the video here.

Temple Grandin is one of my heroes. She had a lot to overcome, and she overcame. Compared to her, my difficulties with Asperger's Syndrome are minor inconveniences.

Bob Kolker

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Temple is one of my heros too.

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