Joss Delage

Meaty comfort food

17 posts in this topic

I love big flavor comfort food, and I thought I'd start a thread on the theme. We can exchange ideas here.

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Here is my first recipe. This is one we seem to make every couple of month at home, it being so good, satisfying, and a great combination of simple ingredients and complex flavors...

I found the recipe in Cook's Illustrated's The New Best Recipe book

Rustic slow simmered meaty sauce for pasta

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 1/2 Lb beef short ribs

1 onion, minced or diced

1/2 cup red wine

1 28-ounce can diced tomatoes

1 Lb pasta (I like the farfalle or the twisted pasta for this chunky sauce)

The proportions are flexible. I like to cook big batches of this, by 3 Lb of meat, and I don't worry too much about exact proportions. Often I need a bit more oil than that for proper browning, but it also depends on the fat released by the meat.

You need a cast iron deep pot like a Le Creuset dutch oven, or alternatively you can use a cast iron skillet for browning, and a non-cast iron pot for simmering. Personally, I find the deep dutch oven very convenient because it limits the fat projections during browning.

Get the meat out of the fridge 30mn before you start. Pat the meat dry with paper towels and salt generously.

Take a big cast iron dutch oven or similar, and heat the olive oil. When hot, start browning the pieces of short ribs on all sides. Depending on your stove, it can take just a couple minutes per side or more. You want to develop the nice brown crust on all sides, but you are not trying to cook the meat deeply. When done, remove the meat to a plate and set aside.

Remove most of the fat from the pot and lower the heat, then cook the onions for 2 or 3 mn, until softened. Then add the wine and use a wood spatula to scrape all the tasty bits from the bottom.

Put everything back into your deep pot, including the meat and accumulated juices from the plate. Add the tomatoes, and bring to a boil, then turn down the heat to low, cover, and let it cook for a couple hours, turning the ribs a few times. The ribs should be super tender.

Turn off the heat, transfer the ribs to a plate and let them cool. When you can touch them, bring them to a big cutting board, and shred the meat. The best way I found is to use one fork on each hand and use a shearing motion. You want to keep the long fibers intact and not cut the meat. Discard the bones and the big pieces of fat and connective tissue, but don't be too anal about it, as the connective tissue will melt and give much "body" to the sauce. This is the most labor intensive part of the process.

When you're done, put all the meat back into the pot with the tomatoes and onions. Cook it on medium low, just enough to heat it through and for all the juices to mix. It's a minimum of 5mn, but you could cook it for another hour and not loose much.

Cook your pasta al dente, drain, put in a serving bowl. Toss the pasta with the sauce or serve separately (I like it separately).

EDIT: I generaly love spices and garlic, and in some respect this dish seems to be screaming for this. However, what really caracterizes this dish is the intense meaty flavor, and you would maybe loose some of that if you added too much stuff to it.

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Beef short ribs were my food revelation last year. They have an incredible meaty flavor which is impossible to get from nicer cuts. Oxtail also have a good flavor, but they're even more work.

OK, here is another recipe on the same theme of big flavor comfort food. It was published in the Nov 2004 edition of "Saveur", a US cooking magazine, but it's a traditional French dish:

Hachis Parmentier

(Shredded beef with mashed potatoes)

Recipe available here:

http://www.saveur.com/article/Food/Shredde...Mashed-Potatoes

1 lb. meaty beef shanks

1 lb. beef short ribs

3/4 lb. boneless rump roast

2 medium carrots, peeled, trimmed, and cut into thirds

2 ribs celery, cut into thirds

2 large yellow onions, peeled and quartered

1 bouquet garni of 6 small fresh sprigs parsley, 6 black peppercorns, 1 bay leaf, and

1 large peeled clove garlic, tied in cheesecloth with kitchen twine

5 russet potatoes, peeled

Salt

1/2 cup milk, scalded

9 1/2 oz. (2 sticks plus 3 tbsp.) butter, plus 6 tbsp. (optional)

1 large clove garlic; peeled and minced

Pinch freshly grated nutmeg

Freshly ground black pepper

1 tbsp. flour

1/2 cup fresh bread crumbs (optional)

1. Put meats, carrots, celery, half the onions, and bouquet garni into a large stockpot. Add 10 cups cold water and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce heat to medium and simmer, skimming any foam and fat that rise to the surface, until meats are tender, about 2 hours. Strain stock into a large bowl, discarding vegetables and bouquet garni, and set aside. Remove and discard bones, fat, and sinew from meat, coarsely shred meat, and set aside.

2. Put potatoes into a large pot, cover with cold water by 2"–3", and add a generous pinch of salt. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat, reduce heat to medium, and gently boil until potatoes are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 30 minutes. Drain potatoes, then press through a potato ricer or mash with a potato masher in a large bowl. Add hot milk, 16 tbsp. of the butter, garlic, nutmeg, and salt and pepper to taste and beat with a wooden spoon until smooth. Adjust seasonings, cover to keep warm, and set aside.

3. Preheat oven to 400°. Chop remaining onions. Melt 2 tbsp. of the butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Add onions and cook until soft, about 8 minutes. Sprinkle flour over onions and cook,

stirring constantly, for 1–2 minutes. Reduce heat to medium-low, stir in 3/4 cup of the reserved beef stock (save remaining stock for another use), and cook, stirring frequently, until onion mixture is browned and very thick, about 15 minutes. Set aside.

4. Grease a 2-quart baking dish with 1 tbsp. of the butter; set aside. Add onion mixture to shredded meat, season to taste with salt and pepper, and mix well. Spread 4 cups of the mashed potatoes in bottom of baking dish; cover with chredded meat mixture. Spread remaining potatoes on top and sprinkle with bread crumbs (if using). Melt remaining 6 tbsp. butter (if using) and drizzle over bread crumbs. Bake until golden brown on top, 20-30 minutes. Let rest briefly before serving.

I think you could brown the meat before boiling it, same as with the previous recipe, to improve the flavors.

The recipe above can be made (much) richer with this garlic & cream mashed potato recipe, which I got from an Alton Brown recipe on the Food Network:

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-b...cipe/index.html

I made a batch of this recipe once for Thanksgiving, and decided to use the leftovers with the hachis parmentier - it was superb.

Creamy Garlic Mashed Potatoes

3 1/2 pounds russet potatoes

16 fluid ounces (2 cups) half-and-half

6 cloves garlic, crushed

2 tablespoons kosher salt

6 ounces grated Parmesan

Peel and dice potatoes, making sure all are relatively the same size. Place in a large saucepan and cover with water. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat and then reduce heat to maintain a rolling boil. Cook until potatoes fall apart when poked with a fork.

Heat the half-and-half and the garlic in a medium saucepan over medium heat until simmering. Remove from heat and set aside.

Remove the potatoes from the heat and drain off the water. Mash and add the garlic-cream mixture, salt, and Parmesan; stir to combine. Let stand for 5 minutes so that mixture thickens and then serve.

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Beef short ribs were my food revelation last year. They have an incredible meaty flavor which is impossible to get from nicer cuts. Oxtail also have a good flavor, but they're even more work.

OK, here is another recipe on the same theme of big flavor comfort food. It was published in the Nov 2004 edition of "Saveur", a US cooking magazine, but it's a traditional French dish:

Hachis Parmentier

(Shredded beef with mashed potatoes)

Recipe available here:

http://www.saveur.com/article/Food/Shredde...Mashed-Potatoes

1 lb. meaty beef shanks

1 lb. beef short ribs

3/4 lb. boneless rump roast

2 medium carrots, peeled, trimmed, and cut into thirds

2 ribs celery, cut into thirds

2 large yellow onions, peeled and quartered

1 bouquet garni of 6 small fresh sprigs parsley, 6 black peppercorns, 1 bay leaf, and

1 large peeled clove garlic, tied in cheesecloth with kitchen twine

5 russet potatoes, peeled

Salt

1/2 cup milk, scalded

9 1/2 oz. (2 sticks plus 3 tbsp.) butter, plus 6 tbsp. (optional)

1 large clove garlic; peeled and minced

Pinch freshly grated nutmeg

Freshly ground black pepper

1 tbsp. flour

1/2 cup fresh bread crumbs (optional)

1. Put meats, carrots, celery, half the onions, and bouquet garni into a large stockpot. Add 10 cups cold water and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce heat to medium and simmer, skimming any foam and fat that rise to the surface, until meats are tender, about 2 hours. Strain stock into a large bowl, discarding vegetables and bouquet garni, and set aside. Remove and discard bones, fat, and sinew from meat, coarsely shred meat, and set aside.

2. Put potatoes into a large pot, cover with cold water by 2"–3", and add a generous pinch of salt. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat, reduce heat to medium, and gently boil until potatoes are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 30 minutes. Drain potatoes, then press through a potato ricer or mash with a potato masher in a large bowl. Add hot milk, 16 tbsp. of the butter, garlic, nutmeg, and salt and pepper to taste and beat with a wooden spoon until smooth. Adjust seasonings, cover to keep warm, and set aside.

3. Preheat oven to 400°. Chop remaining onions. Melt 2 tbsp. of the butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Add onions and cook until soft, about 8 minutes. Sprinkle flour over onions and cook,

stirring constantly, for 1–2 minutes. Reduce heat to medium-low, stir in 3/4 cup of the reserved beef stock (save remaining stock for another use), and cook, stirring frequently, until onion mixture is browned and very thick, about 15 minutes. Set aside.

4. Grease a 2-quart baking dish with 1 tbsp. of the butter; set aside. Add onion mixture to shredded meat, season to taste with salt and pepper, and mix well. Spread 4 cups of the mashed potatoes in bottom of baking dish; cover with chredded meat mixture. Spread remaining potatoes on top and sprinkle with bread crumbs (if using). Melt remaining 6 tbsp. butter (if using) and drizzle over bread crumbs. Bake until golden brown on top, 20-30 minutes. Let rest briefly before serving.

I think you could brown the meat before boiling it, same as with the previous recipe, to improve the flavors.

The recipe above can be made (much) richer with this garlic & cream mashed potato recipe, which I got from an Alton Brown recipe on the Food Network:

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-b...cipe/index.html

I made a batch of this recipe once for Thanksgiving, and decided to use the leftovers with the hachis parmentier - it was superb.

Creamy Garlic Mashed Potatoes

3 1/2 pounds russet potatoes

16 fluid ounces (2 cups) half-and-half

6 cloves garlic, crushed

2 tablespoons kosher salt

6 ounces grated Parmesan

Peel and dice potatoes, making sure all are relatively the same size. Place in a large saucepan and cover with water. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat and then reduce heat to maintain a rolling boil. Cook until potatoes fall apart when poked with a fork.

Heat the half-and-half and the garlic in a medium saucepan over medium heat until simmering. Remove from heat and set aside.

Remove the potatoes from the heat and drain off the water. Mash and add the garlic-cream mixture, salt, and Parmesan; stir to combine. Let stand for 5 minutes so that mixture thickens and then serve.

Wow. That looks delicious. I did a similar recipe with lamb a while ago -- but the recipe was a bit different -- cant find it now. Will try this one. Thanks Joss!

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I love big flavor comfort food, and I thought I'd start a thread on the theme. We can exchange ideas here.

I've never liked the kinds of dishes that are most commonly referred to as stews, which I'll define as "a bunch of meat and vegetables of various kinds swimming in enough of some kind of gravy to make it almost but not quite soup." An example of that sort of thing would be traditional beef stew. The same goes for what to me are related dishes, like pot pie. I don't like beef or chicken gravy very much, and when I do use it it's very sparingly.

I know that my definition doesn't cover everything that falls into this category, and I certainly don't mean there's anything wrong with others' enjoyment of them. And, like anything else, I'm open to discovering something that will change my mind. :) I had some sort of game-based pot pie once in Gettysburg, PA that was quite good. Also, I can definitely get behind that pasta sauce (minus the onions, of course - I'd substitute something, probably garlic). However I have my own personal, secret recipe for that.

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I love big flavor comfort food, and I thought I'd start a thread on the theme. We can exchange ideas here.

I've never liked the kinds of dishes that are most commonly referred to as stews, which I'll define as "a bunch of meat and vegetables of various kinds swimming in enough of some kind of gravy to make it almost but not quite soup." An example of that sort of thing would be traditional beef stew. The same goes for what to me are related dishes, like pot pie. I don't like beef or chicken gravy very much, and when I do use it it's very sparingly.

I know that my definition doesn't cover everything that falls into this category, and I certainly don't mean there's anything wrong with others' enjoyment of them. And, like anything else, I'm open to discovering something that will change my mind. :) I had some sort of game-based pot pie once in Gettysburg, PA that was quite good. Also, I can definitely get behind that pasta sauce (minus the onions, of course - I'd substitute something, probably garlic). However I have my own personal, secret recipe for that.

Share the recipe piz!

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I've never liked the kinds of dishes that are most commonly referred to as stews, which I'll define as "a bunch of meat and vegetables of various kinds swimming in enough of some kind of gravy to make it almost but not quite soup." An example of that sort of thing would be traditional beef stew. The same goes for what to me are related dishes, like pot pie.

I am not a big find of US-style gravy, but I do like broth. Of course, it is mostly useful as a base for something else, although when one is battling a bad cold, a big bowl of broth can be really recomforting. Chicken broth in particular is so easy to make and freeze that there's really no reason to ever use canned broth (beef broth is more expensive and time consumming).

I like stews, depending on the kind of course, but this thread is meant to cover all big flavor family-style comfort food with a strong meat presence.

(If one day you come to Paris, I'll take you to a Moroccan restaurant to try couscous or a tagine. You might find something to enjoy in those.)

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Beef short ribs were my food revelation last year. They have an incredible meaty flavor which is impossible to get from nicer cuts. Oxtail also have a good flavor, but they're even more work.

OK, here is another recipe on the same theme of big flavor comfort food. It was published in the Nov 2004 edition of "Saveur", a US cooking magazine, but it's a traditional French dish:

Hachis Parmentier

(Shredded beef with mashed potatoes)

Recipe available here:

http://www.saveur.com/article/Food/Shredde...Mashed-Potatoes

1 lb. meaty beef shanks

1 lb. beef short ribs

3/4 lb. boneless rump roast

2 medium carrots, peeled, trimmed, and cut into thirds

2 ribs celery, cut into thirds

2 large yellow onions, peeled and quartered

1 bouquet garni of 6 small fresh sprigs parsley, 6 black peppercorns, 1 bay leaf, and

1 large peeled clove garlic, tied in cheesecloth with kitchen twine

5 russet potatoes, peeled

Salt

1/2 cup milk, scalded

9 1/2 oz. (2 sticks plus 3 tbsp.) butter, plus 6 tbsp. (optional)

1 large clove garlic; peeled and minced

Pinch freshly grated nutmeg

Freshly ground black pepper

1 tbsp. flour

1/2 cup fresh bread crumbs (optional)

1. Put meats, carrots, celery, half the onions, and bouquet garni into a large stockpot. Add 10 cups cold water and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce heat to medium and simmer, skimming any foam and fat that rise to the surface, until meats are tender, about 2 hours. Strain stock into a large bowl, discarding vegetables and bouquet garni, and set aside. Remove and discard bones, fat, and sinew from meat, coarsely shred meat, and set aside.

2. Put potatoes into a large pot, cover with cold water by 2"–3", and add a generous pinch of salt. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat, reduce heat to medium, and gently boil until potatoes are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 30 minutes. Drain potatoes, then press through a potato ricer or mash with a potato masher in a large bowl. Add hot milk, 16 tbsp. of the butter, garlic, nutmeg, and salt and pepper to taste and beat with a wooden spoon until smooth. Adjust seasonings, cover to keep warm, and set aside.

3. Preheat oven to 400°. Chop remaining onions. Melt 2 tbsp. of the butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Add onions and cook until soft, about 8 minutes. Sprinkle flour over onions and cook,

stirring constantly, for 1–2 minutes. Reduce heat to medium-low, stir in 3/4 cup of the reserved beef stock (save remaining stock for another use), and cook, stirring frequently, until onion mixture is browned and very thick, about 15 minutes. Set aside.

4. Grease a 2-quart baking dish with 1 tbsp. of the butter; set aside. Add onion mixture to shredded meat, season to taste with salt and pepper, and mix well. Spread 4 cups of the mashed potatoes in bottom of baking dish; cover with chredded meat mixture. Spread remaining potatoes on top and sprinkle with bread crumbs (if using). Melt remaining 6 tbsp. butter (if using) and drizzle over bread crumbs. Bake until golden brown on top, 20-30 minutes. Let rest briefly before serving.

I think you could brown the meat before boiling it, same as with the previous recipe, to improve the flavors.

The recipe above can be made (much) richer with this garlic & cream mashed potato recipe, which I got from an Alton Brown recipe on the Food Network:

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-b...cipe/index.html

I made a batch of this recipe once for Thanksgiving, and decided to use the leftovers with the hachis parmentier - it was superb.

Creamy Garlic Mashed Potatoes

3 1/2 pounds russet potatoes

16 fluid ounces (2 cups) half-and-half

6 cloves garlic, crushed

2 tablespoons kosher salt

6 ounces grated Parmesan

Peel and dice potatoes, making sure all are relatively the same size. Place in a large saucepan and cover with water. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat and then reduce heat to maintain a rolling boil. Cook until potatoes fall apart when poked with a fork.

Heat the half-and-half and the garlic in a medium saucepan over medium heat until simmering. Remove from heat and set aside.

Remove the potatoes from the heat and drain off the water. Mash and add the garlic-cream mixture, salt, and Parmesan; stir to combine. Let stand for 5 minutes so that mixture thickens and then serve.

Joss -- do you often make your own stock? A cook friend of mine says it is better to make ones own. If you do, do you have some favorite recipes and tips?

And you are married, right? Do you do most of the cooking for the family? Or is it shared equally? Or something else? My boyfriend and I have been discussing this recently.

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However I have my own personal, secret recipe for that.

Share the recipe piz!

To borrow from Lazlo Gogolak in The Whole Ten Yards: Let me explain to you when we get a moment together, the concept of the secret recipe.

I knew someone would do that. :)

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Joss -- do you often make your own stock? A cook friend of mine says it is better to make ones own. If you do, do you have some favorite recipes and tips?

For chicken, yes, I try to. It's just too easy not to do it yourself. All you need is to take a chicken, cut it in pieces, brown the pieces, and boil, then simmer it for a while. Then you let it cool, put it in the fridge, remove the congealed fat, and freeze it in easy-to-use portions. This is for a broth to use as a base. For something that has more depth on its own, you add carrots, celery, and onion, and some spices (pepper, bouquet garni). Chicken is so easy to make into a browth that you can make a decent broth using the left-overs from a roasted chicken (bones and as much skin as possible are required). You can add a few chicken wings to that and get something pretty good.

And you are married, right? Do you do most of the cooking for the family? Or is it shared equally? Or something else? My boyfriend and I have been discussing this recently.

It depends. We both enjoy cooking, we have different style. Sometimes we cook together, sometimes one of use takes over for the whole dinner. My partner is objectively a better cook than I am overall. I love food, but I mostly like cooking for the satisfaction of doing something from start-to-finish and get quick feedback. It makes a nice balance with work.

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Chicken is so easy to make into a browth that you can make a decent broth using the left-overs from a roasted chicken (bones and as much skin as possible are required). You can add a few chicken wings to that and get something pretty good.

The way I make chicken broth is to put all the skin and bones from when I eat chicken into a gallon Zip-Lock bag that I keep in the freezer. When the bag gets full, I dump the contents into a big soup pot, add onion, garlic, carrots, or any other veggies I have handy, add water to cover, and simmer for at least an hour. Then I strain the soup into quart Mason jars and put it in the fridge. When it is cooled I skim off the fat, use some right away, and freeze the rest in pint containers.

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I have discovered the joys of meat pies in Australia. Before I moved here, I thought the idea was rather disgusting, having suffered through bad ones in England. But, like many things here, the Australians have taken a bland English staple and made it quite lovely. Part of it, I think, has to do with the generally better quality of beef and lamb here, but I find the Aussies have a real flair for the things Americans treat as sweet foods only, yet make them savoury delights. This includes muffins.

Some of the best meat pies I've had were in cafes, but over time, I plan to learn to make them myself.

Thanks, Australia, for getting me to like something I otherwise eschewed!

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I have always loved cooking, but this summer, I have been cooking a lot more than usual. I'd say at least one or two new recipes a week. My source is a wonderful website called Epicurious.com Link: http://www.epicurious.com/articlesguides/healthy

8 out of 10 recipes I've made from this site have turned out beautifully. I love the format of the site, it's easy to navigate, and you can specify your search for recipes. For example, in the advanced search, you can specify the main ingredient, whether it's healthy, or quick. I also love the reviews. A lot of experienced cooks who have tried out the recipes can give their two cents about how it turned out, and how they have tweaked it to cater to personal taste or better preparation. Another neat little aspect is that you can save your favourite recipes in your own recipe box when you sign up for a free account.

There is a particular recipe that would be perfect for this thread. It's perfect comfort food and by far one of the best home cooked meals I've ever had. It has a tone of flavor and a little kick to it. P.S, in this recipe I added about a half a cup of canned peas, just to add variety. :)

Bon Appétit | March 2007

SPICED BEEF STEW WITH CARROTS AND MINT

This North African-inspired stew is good over couscous with a little lemon juice and chopped mint. Because it's made with beef tenderloin, it's ready in minutes instead of hours.

Prep: 30 minutes

Total: 40 minutes

Servings: Makes 2 servings.

Ingredients

2 tablespoons olive oil, divided

12 ounces beef tenderloin, cut into 1-inch cubes

1 cup sliced shallots (about 3 large)

8 ounces peeled baby carrots

2 teaspoons ground cumin

1 1/2 teaspoons pumpkin pie spice

1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper

1 tablespoon all purpose flour

2 1/2 cups beef broth

1/3 cup chopped fresh mint, divided

Preparation

Heat 1 tablespoon oil in large nonstick skillet over high heat. Sprinkle beef with salt and pepper. Add beef to skillet and sauté until cooked to desired doneness, about 2 minutes for medium-rare. Using slotted spoon, transfer beef to bowl. Add remaining 1 tablespoon oil to skillet. Add shallots and carrots and sauté until golden, about 3 minutes. Add all spices; stir 30 seconds. Sprinkle flour over; stir 30 seconds. Stir in broth and bring to boil. Reduce heat to medium; simmer until carrots are just tender, about 8 minutes. Return beef to skillet; cook until sauce thickens slightly, about 1 minute. Season stew to taste with salt and pepper. Stir in 1/4 cup chopped mint. Transfer stew to bowls. Sprinkle with remaining chopped mint and serve.

Nutritional Information

One serving contains the following: 568.44 Calories (kcal), 57.5% Calories from Fat, 36.33 g Fat, 10.34 g Saturated Fat, 110.53 mg Cholesterol, 19.64 g Carbohydrates, 5.68 g Dietary Fiber, 8.07 g Total Sugars, 13.96 g Net Carbs, 37.16 g Protein.

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That looks good - I love North African food & cumin. What is in pumpkin pie spice? It's not going to be a staple here in Paris. I assume cinnamon,...?

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Pumpkin pie spice: Cinnamon

Ginger

Nutmeg

Allspice

Cloves

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That looks good - I love North African food & cumin. What is in pumpkin pie spice? It's not going to be a staple here in Paris. I assume cinnamon,...?

Cinnamon yes. Usually also nugmeg, ginger, cloves, allspice. As with curries, the ingredients and amounts vary according to taste.

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SPICED BEEF STEW WITH CARROTS AND MINT

This North African-inspired stew is good over couscous with a little lemon juice and chopped mint. Because it's made with beef tenderloin, it's ready in minutes instead of hours...

This was quite possibly the best thing we cooked all summer, it was incredible!

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