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Interesting ways to prepare corn on the cob

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This recipe is from the website I told you about before, Epicurious.com

I've always liked corn on the cob. I would boil it, smear some butter, and if adventurous, salt and pepper (!)

But after making this recipe, I was so impressed at the combination of flavor. If you like corn on the cob, you'll love this recipe.

MINI CORN ON THE COB

Active time: 5 min Start to finish: 15 min

Servings: Makes 4 servings

Ingredients

Kosher salt to taste

3 ears corn, shucked and cut into thirds

3 tablespoons unsalted butter

2 tablespoons fresh lime juice

1 teaspoon chili powder

1 cup grated Parmesan

Preparation

1. In a pot of salted boiling water, cook the corn, covered, for about 4 minutes. Drain and set aside.

2. Return the pot to medium heat and melt the butter.

3. Add the lime juice and chili powder and stir to combine.

4. Return the cobs to the pot and stir until they're coated with the mixture.

5. Transfer to a platter, sprinkle with the Parmesan, and serve.

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I enthusiastically support this recipe!

Me too! A friend of mine turned me on to this a while ago -- though I dont remember the parmesan cheese -- nice addition!

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This recipe is from the website I told you about before, Epicurious.com

[...]

Kosher salt to taste

3 ears corn, shucked and cut into thirds

3 tablespoons unsalted butter

2 tablespoons fresh lime juice

1 teaspoon chili powder

1 cup grated Parmesan

Preparation

1. In a pot of salted boiling water, cook the corn, covered, for about 4 minutes. Drain and set aside.

2. Return the pot to medium heat and melt the butter.

3. Add the lime juice and chili powder and stir to combine.

4. Return the cobs to the pot and stir until they're coated with the mixture.

5. Transfer to a platter, sprinkle with the Parmesan, and serve.

I enthusiastically support this recipe!

Me too! A friend of mine turned me on to this a while ago -- though I dont remember the parmesan cheese -- nice addition!

Me three -- with a slight alteration, as I've never been too fond of chili powder. I would probably substitute this great spice, which I can't praise highly enough. And besides, it reminds me of home.

OLD BAY® SEASONING

img_product_seasoning.jpg

There are two things you need to know about OLD BAY® Seasoning: 1) it's great on seafood and 2) it's great on everything else. For 60 years it's ruled the spice rack as The Definitive Seafood Spice, with a world-famous blend of 12 herbs and spices.

In Chesapeake Bay, it's on every dining room table, nestled between the salt and pepper shakers. But it's more than that. It's a time-honored tradition. When somebody whips out the little yellow can, you know you're in for a good time.

FOR ZEST RESULTS, SPRINKLE AS DIRECTED

Sprinkle lovingly on:

all seafood, all shellfish

french fries & fried chicken

hamburgers & sandwiches

popcorn

pizza

hors d'oeuvres

dips & cheese platters

baked potatoes

mashed potatoes

steamed veggies

macaroni

meats & poultry

deviled eggs, scrabbled eggs

egg, tuna or chicken salad

casseroles

stir-frys

soups, stews and gumbo

Bloody Marys

Tip: Keep one in your purse or fanny pack to battle bland food on-the-go.

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Me three -- with a slight alteration, as I've never been too fond of chili powder. I would probably substitute this great spice, which I can't praise highly enough. And besides, it reminds me of home.
OLD BAY® SEASONING

img_product_seasoning.jpg

As long as we're offering alternatives, I recommend Emeril Lagasse's "Essence," a fantastic blend of spices. You can buy it pre-mixed in stores or make it yourself. I do the latter because I use it enough that I need to keep it on hand in large quantities.

Speaking of large quantities, here's a tip: buy your spices at your local restaurant supply store. The price per ounce is drastically less than in grocery stores, and not everything has to be purchased by the case, at least at the one I go to. Buy many other things there, too. I recommend a trip just to browse around a place like that, if you've never been to one before. It's like Home Depot for cooks. The best one in my area is called "The Restaurant Store," which is a regional chain in eastern PA. The first time I went there it was all I could do not to completely replace all my cookware with their "industrial-grade" offerings. I was even tempted by an approximately 50-inch diameter wok. :) I settled for a standard-size on, the kind I've seen in nearly every Chinese restaurant I've ever been in. It's infinitely better than the Joan Chen brand one I had bought from, and returned to (because it was crappy), Bed Bath and Beyond. Mine cost not even half what that one did and will last a lifetime.

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The best way to serve corn: pan roast the kernels, allow to cool a bit, toss with equal parts of room temperature, softly simmered lobster, diced tomatoes, lobster demi-glace and aioli. Fill hard tacos and serve!

;-)

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Speaking of large quantities, here's a tip: buy your spices at your local restaurant supply store. The price per ounce is drastically less than in grocery stores, and not everything has to be purchased by the case, at least at the one I go to. Buy many other things there, too. I recommend a trip just to browse around a place like that, if you've never been to one before. It's like Home Depot for cooks. The best one in my area is called "The Restaurant Store," which is a regional chain in eastern PA. The first time I went there it was all I could do not to completely replace all my cookware with their "industrial-grade" offerings. I was even tempted by an approximately 50-inch diameter wok. :) I settled for a standard-size on, the kind I've seen in nearly every Chinese restaurant I've ever been in. It's infinitely better than the Joan Chen brand one I had bought from, and returned to (because it was crappy), Bed Bath and Beyond. Mine cost not even half what that one did and will last a lifetime.

Off-topic: Michael, I'm looking at getting a decent wok, and after a little research, cast iron seems the best way to go. What kind of wok did you end up with and how much was it?

On-topic: The recipe sounds awesome. I'll try it!

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As long as we're offering alternatives, I recommend Emeril Lagasse's "Essence," a fantastic blend of spices. You can buy it pre-mixed in stores or make it yourself. I do the latter because I use it enough that I need to keep it on hand in large quantities.
Emeril's Creole Seasoning (Essence)

Recipe from New New Orleans Cooking by Emeril Lagasse and Jessie Tirsch, Published by William and Morrow, 1993

Show: Emeril Live

Episode: Herbs and Spices

2 1/2 tablespoons paprika

2 tablespoons salt

2 tablespoons garlic powder

1 tablespoon black pepper

1 tablespoon onion powder

1 tablespoon cayenne pepper

1 tablespoon dried leaf oregano

1 tablespoon dried thyme

[emphases added]

Hmm. :)

For anyone new, who doesn't understand my point, see this thread.

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As long as we're offering alternatives, I recommend Emeril Lagasse's "Essence," a fantastic blend of spices. You can buy it pre-mixed in stores or make it yourself. I do the latter because I use it enough that I need to keep it on hand in large quantities.
Emeril's Creole Seasoning (Essence)

Recipe from New New Orleans Cooking by Emeril Lagasse and Jessie Tirsch, Published by William and Morrow, 1993

Show: Emeril Live

Episode: Herbs and Spices

2 1/2 tablespoons paprika

2 tablespoons salt

2 tablespoons garlic powder

1 tablespoon black pepper

1 tablespoon onion powder

1 tablespoon cayenne pepper

1 tablespoon dried leaf oregano

1 tablespoon dried thyme

[emphases added]

Hmm. :)

For anyone new, who doesn't understand my point, see this thread.

Yeah, yeah. I admit, I use onion powder in some things. Raw onions are still pure evil. In fact, they're the cause of the current financial crisis.

:)

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