Vespasiano

Election Day, 2008

11 posts in this topic

America has known another man from Illinois. Aaron Copland's Lincoln Portrait was written as a tribute to our 16th President. Listening to it today, I was reminded not only of Mr. Lincoln's enormous stature but, sadly, of just how shrunken his modern-day "equivalents" have become.

NOTE: The audio for this clip is a bit on the low side -- you may wish to "crank up the volume".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Whatever his problems, I agree that he was a giant compared to any of the single-celled organisms that pass as politicians today. Copland's tribute is solemn and dramatic. This is the text from the tribute.

Notably:

"It is the eternal struggle between two principles, right and wrong, throughout the world. It is the same spirit that says 'you toil and work and earn bread, and I'll eat it.' No matter in what shape it comes, whether from the mouth of a king who seeks to bestride the people of his own nation, and live by the fruit of their labor, or from one race of men as an apology for enslaving another race, it is the same tyrannical principle." [October, 1858]

The same tyrannical principle still in full force almost exactly 150 years later.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for that link Phil. That was a nice breath of fresh air.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Whatever his problems, I agree that he was a giant compared to any of the single-celled organisms that pass as politicians today. Copland's tribute is solemn and dramatic. This is the text from the tribute.

Notably:

"It is the eternal struggle between two principles, right and wrong, throughout the world. It is the same spirit that says 'you toil and work and earn bread, and I'll eat it.' No matter in what shape it comes, whether from the mouth of a king who seeks to bestride the people of his own nation, and live by the fruit of their labor, or from one race of men as an apology for enslaving another race, it is the same tyrannical principle." [October, 1858]

The same tyrannical principle still in full force almost exactly 150 years later.

Indeed, Phil. This is my favorite quote contained in the Copland Portrait -- it is a statement of a principle in direct opposition to that espoused by today's midgets.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Whatever his problems, I agree that he was a giant compared to any of the single-celled organisms that pass as politicians today. Copland's tribute is solemn and dramatic.

Without meaning to sully the importance, or change the direction, of Vespasiano's thread in any way at all, there is some personal irony in the fact that I first heard of Aaron Copland after watching the Spike Lee [yes, the racist filmmaker] estranged-father-gifted-son movie, He Got Game. (I was, to a significant extent, in my pre-Objectivism days, a fan of Spike Lee's.)

Spike Lee introduces me to Aaron Copland, and the next time I hear a Copland piece I did not seek out, is in an almost opposite context: on THE FORUM, a site for individualists, for his work in praising Lincoln, the U.S. President who ended slavery in America's South. But, on this very night, the perfect candidate of the perpetually-aggrieved (e.g. Lee) is set to be elected President of the United States of America.

(I don't want to turn this into a thread on Copland or Lee; but, the power of Copland's music is noteworthy. Life, even when sliced, is imbued with a remarkable gravity. Here are the

and close of He Got Game. Try to watch the clips in their entirety, while focusing on the way sound is employed.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Without meaning to sully the importance, or change the direction, of Vespasiano's thread in any way at all, there is some personal irony in the fact that I first heard of Aaron Copland after watching the Spike Lee [yes, the racist filmmaker] estranged-father-gifted-son movie, He Got Game. (I was, to a significant extent, in my pre-Objectivism days, a fan of Spike Lee's.)

I have a similar irony: I learned to like Beethoven while watching A Clockwork Orange, with it's bizarre use of the 9th.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Whatever his problems, I agree that he was a giant compared to any of the single-celled organisms that pass as politicians today. Copland's tribute is solemn and dramatic.

Without meaning to sully the importance, or change the direction, of Vespasiano's thread in any way at all, there is some personal irony in the fact that I first heard of Aaron Copland after watching the Spike Lee [yes, the racist filmmaker] estranged-father-gifted-son movie, He Got Game. (I was, to a significant extent, in my pre-Objectivism days, a fan of Spike Lee's.)

Spike Lee introduces me to Aaron Copland, and the next time I hear a Copland piece I did not seek out, is in an almost opposite context: on THE FORUM, a site for individualists, for his work in praising Lincoln, the U.S. President who ended slavery in America's South. But, on this very night, the perfect candidate of the perpetually-aggrieved (e.g. Lee) is set to be elected President of the United States of America.

(I don't want to turn this into a thread on Copland or Lee; but, the power of Copland's music is noteworthy. Life, even when sliced, is imbued with a remarkable gravity. Here are the

and close of He Got Game. Try to watch the clips in their entirety, while focusing on the way sound is employed.)

If you take a moment to look at some of comments for this clip, you'll notice one very recent one (it was the most recent this morning) by what I imagine to be a typical Obama supporter. This person understands all too well that the principle of individual rights voiced and acted upon by Mr. Lincoln run counter to his own collectivist one, a fact he finds disturbing.

I don't find your comment out of place at all. Indeed, a similar thought occurred to me when listening to it earlier today: within the context of a consideration of Mr. Lincoln's presidency and of his stirring words in opposition to slavery contained in Copland's Portrait, the potential of a present-day Obama presidency -- that of a Black man advocating the enslavement of some, if not all, to all -- in the nation Mr. Lincoln worked to preserve is rich with irony. TOO rich, in fact to be even remotely humorous.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
America has known another man from Illinois. Aaron Copland's Lincoln Portrait was written as a tribute to our 16th President. Listening to it today, I was reminded not only of Mr. Lincoln's enormous stature but, sadly, of just how shrunken his modern-day "equivalents" have become.

Lincoln's reign lead to the end of Federalism as envisioned by the Founders. Prior to the Civil War we had a Federal government. After the Civil War we had a National government. That is Lincoln's legacy. That slick corporate lawyer continued the journey started by Andrew Jackson. Down the road to perdition.

ruveyn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
America has known another man from Illinois. Aaron Copland's Lincoln Portrait was written as a tribute to our 16th President. Listening to it today, I was reminded not only of Mr. Lincoln's enormous stature but, sadly, of just how shrunken his modern-day "equivalents" have become.

Lincoln's reign lead to the end of Federalism as envisioned by the Founders. Prior to the Civil War we had a Federal government. After the Civil War we had a National government. That is Lincoln's legacy. That slick corporate lawyer continued the journey started by Andrew Jackson. Down the road to perdition.

ruveyn

A strong central government with authority is good, otherwise you just have a loose collection of nation states.

Why does everyone put such a value on "states rights"?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites