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free spirit

Chef Gordon Ramsay

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I vote Chef Gordon Ramsay as among The Good. I have been watching all of his shows on DVD I can get my hands on.

It's truly wonderful to watch a person in action with as much dedication and passion as he has.

That he swears like there's no tomorrow is completely irrelevant to me.

He has passion. It shows in the time, effort and success he has put into his career. His standards are impeccable. From the management of a restaurant to the presentation of food to the quality of the servers.

He has full integrity to each of his standards. To each area of the kitchen.

No matter who he meets, in whatever area of the UK or America, he is always the same constant Gordon. His one goal is to watch and evaluate. And when he has come to a conclusion he communicates it clearly to the point.

With almost anyone (that matters), he always resonates with. If they don't at first, because they don't like hearing the truth so clearly, they eventually do.

He brings out the best possible in the people who are willing to listen.

And with anyone who's willing to listen he is right there, ready to give them advice, train them.

He is un-pretentious, incredibly honest, passionate, incredibly hard working, down to earth and funny ^_^

Chef Gordon Ramsay is The Good.

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I agree with Free Spirit.

His show "Kitchen Nightmares" is amazing to watch, and Chef Gordon himself is quite an inspiring figure! (but the British version of the show is much better for some reason ^_^ )

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Regardless of whatever version it is, he is inspiring still the same.

The only difference is how willing the people are to be honest.

But to me, whether or not people are willing to accept the truth is irrelevant to me. It's Gordon.

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Sorry! I forgot to mention something.

His shows are:

1) Kitchen Nightmares

2)Hell's Kitchen

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That he swears like there's no tomorrow is completely irrelevant to me.

......He has passion. It shows in the time, effort and success he has put into his career. His standards are impeccable. ....... Chef Gordon Ramsay is The Good.

His standards in the food business maybe. However if the English language was your passion, I think not. His presentation is like presenting a bouquet of flowers in a piss-pot. Spoils the presentation, for me anyway.

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Regardless of whatever version it is, he is inspiring still the same.

The only difference is how willing the people are to be honest.

But to me, whether or not people are willing to accept the truth is irrelevant to me. It's Gordon.

This is the curious and subtle thing:

Is it that Americans are worse than Britons when it comes to honestly facing their personal problems (as evidenced in the show), or does the American version of the show simply seek out these people who are dishonest with themselves and immaturely dramatic?

If it is the latter case that is still bothersome, because why is the American version marketing the show as being focused so heavily on the dramatic, emotional fireworks of these unstable people? Are the tastes of Americans that much worse than Britons?

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Darren and I are both fans of the (British) show, and have talked about it a couple times in our Objectivist meetings here in KC. What I like best about Chef Ramsay is his passion for teaching and practicing the art of being a successful professional chef. He loves simple, quality food. He's able to turn failures around, showing them the proper approach to cooking or running a restaurant in a straightforward, honest way. He insists on no nonsense and hard work, and celebrates people's success.

The swearing is over the top; it just becomes gratuitous real quick. And I don't care for his excessive browbeating and abrasiveness; that isn't necessary to get through to people, and if you can't get through to them, screw them, don't continue to berate them on the small chance that they'll wake up. But that doesn't ruin the show for me. There are too many good things about it that I'm always glad to watch a new episode. I'd eat his food any day and would love to talk cooking with him. He is definitely the Good!

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Arnold,

Could you please explain to me exactly what you mean by "His presentation is like presenting a bouquet of flowers in a piss-pot" ? That did not make sense to me.

That's too bad you have a negative view of him.

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Is it that Americans are worse than Britons when it comes to honestly facing their personal problems (as evidenced in the show), or does the American version of the show simply seek out these people who are dishonest with themselves and immaturely dramatic?

If it is the latter case that is still bothersome, because why is the American version marketing the show as being focused so heavily on the dramatic, emotional fireworks of these unstable people? Are the tastes of Americans that much worse than Britons?

I confess I've never watched the show because of the way it's marketed here. The drama element is a huge turnoff. Seeing the comments here though, I think I'll check it out.

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I confess I've never watched the show because of the way it's marketed here. The drama element is a huge turnoff. Seeing the comments here though, I think I'll check it out.
I'd recommend only the British show. BBC America shows re-runs several nights a week. Pretty much any given show will give you a good feel for the whole series. One, from a few years ago, took place at The Granary in Hampshire, where "Stussy88" is from.

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I'd recommend only the British show. BBC America shows re-runs several nights a week. Pretty much any given show will give you a good feel for the whole series. One, from a few years ago, took place at The Granary in Hampshire, where "Stussy88" is from.

Cool. I sometimes watch Top Gear on BBC America. I'm not a car enthusiast, and don't even know anything about cars, but I really enjoy watching someone who is passionate about what they do. That's the kind of thing I wish they would show more of on American TV, and less of people doing stupid and embarrassing things.

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I'd recommend only the British show. BBC America shows re-runs several nights a week. Pretty much any given show will give you a good feel for the whole series. One, from a few years ago, took place at The Granary in Hampshire, where "Stussy88" is from.

Cool. I sometimes watch Top Gear on BBC America. I'm not a car enthusiast, and don't even know anything about cars, but I really enjoy watching someone who is passionate about what they do. That's the kind of thing I wish they would show more of on American TV, and less of people doing stupid and embarrassing things.

Yep, ditto me on Top Gear! You definitely don't need to be a gearhead to enjoy it. I'm not, and didn't see how I could like it, but my gearhead buddy kept prodding me to watch it and now I'm hopelessly hooked. Clarkson, May, and Hammond are a riot. The cars are awesome and the photography is beautiful. Ramsay's Kitchen Nightmares often comes on right before or after it. There are three episodes on tonight.

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Arnold,

Could you please explain to me exactly what you mean by "His presentation is like presenting a bouquet of flowers in a piss-pot" ? That did not make sense to me.

That's too bad you have a negative view of him.

I thought it was self explanatory. The bouquet of flowers represents his good standards regarding food. His delivery represents the piss-pot. Now if the flowers were delivered in a beautiful package or vase, the effect would be harmonious. To deliver the flowers in a sewer type wrapping, is not. I know all the words he uses; I use them myself at times. The reason I don't care to wander through Ramsay's nightmares, is similar to the reason I avoid strolls near sewage plants. It's not pleasant.

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free spirit, I think what Arnold is referring to is something like this : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MB8dGQ77Zg0

I thought that was down right abusive and unnecessary. He showed the other chef no respect.

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Yes, I have this episode.

I am not used to his use of.... language, but I have noticed that a lot of the times he can be very patient and encouraging in his way.

The only time I have ever seen him speak like that to other people is when they are evasive, dishonest or just plain stupid. A lot of these 'chefs' should know better, for example, not cooking the food properly (raw) , using frozen or powdered foods, sub-standard cleanliness and so on. Or for instance, in one of the first episodes, a 23 year old guy was a head chef, but he didn't know how to cook an omelette. I don't think these are cases of ignorance, (in which you should never blame someone), but instead a case where someone should know better but is being lazy.

It's an insult to the industry.

He gets frustrated at things that should be common sense, like this video here of not adding certain flavours together. I know that is an optional, but there are certain flavours that just don't go no matter what palette you have. For example salsa and peanut butter.

Or when a kitchen hasn't been cleaned in months and has rat droppings behind the meat cutter. Yeah I'd get mad!! You're putting peoples health at risk!

It mirrors my industry where a person is paying for an experience. They don't want to sit and see dusty tools, dirty floors, and staff that are un-professional or even rude. There are just certain standards of cleanliness and conduct. And these are the things that should be well known from the beginnings.

When you're right on the brink of going bankrupt, and you have automatized a whole host of horrible habits such as the ones I mentioned above, coupled with managers that don't have the courage to be leaders, sometimes his way is necessary. Something like taking someone by the shoulders and shaking them saying "wake up and Think!"

All I've ever seen is positive results from what he does. Yes, what he says seems harsh, but people remember it, and the situation becomes very real. It's not a game.

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People are always quick to point out his abrasiveness, but they don't seem to point out that he doesn't belittle anyone or make them feel horrible for the heck of it. And the fact that he spends so much of his time out there helping restaurants, because he genuinely wants to see them succeed. Kind of like what I try to do when I tell people about Objectivist ideas. It makes feel great when I get my ideas and values out there, and contribute a little in trying to "shape the world in my values". I've seen him be genuinely, pleasantly surprised when a restaurant has maintained what they learned from him and are out of debt.

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I watched an episode tonight and really liked it. I do wish Ramsay would do something about his language. It isn't just when he's angry or frustrated, he's spewing profanity constantly.

Aside from that, though, he strikes me as someone who is focused on reality and passionate about his work. He is just as quick and animated in his praise as he is in his disapproval, and the goal isn't to make people feel good or bad but to help them make a profit. He gets angry, reasonably in my opinion, whenever the client does something to sabotage that. In the episode I watched he was trying to turn around an English pub. The only time he really got angry was when the owner went behind his back and told his cooks that things weren't going to change. So not only was the guy planning to waste everyone's time just to return to the same habits that put the business in danger, but he was going to pretend to comply while on camera. That would have made me mad too.

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I watched an episode tonight and really liked it. I do wish Ramsay would do something about his language. It isn't just when he's angry or frustrated, he's spewing profanity constantly.

Aside from that, though, he strikes me as someone who is focused on reality and passionate about his work. He is just as quick and animated in his praise as he is in his disapproval, and the goal isn't to make people feel good or bad but to help them make a profit. He gets angry, reasonably in my opinion, whenever the client does something to sabotage that. In the episode I watched he was trying to turn around an English pub. The only time he really got angry was when the owner went behind his back and told his cooks that things weren't going to change. So not only was the guy planning to waste everyone's time just to return to the same habits that put the business in danger, but he was going to pretend to comply while on camera. That would have made me mad too.

If you have Bravo, I highly recommend the much-higher-quality Top Chef show, which I hardly ever missed when I was in the States. I also used to almost-religiously watch Bravo's Project Runway, which is a competition for fashion designers.

Bravo use clean, essentialized formats for their shows, delivered with great production values. Apart from the expertise of the chefs on Top Chef and the designers on Project Runway, there are also the two beauties who host the shows: models Padma Lakshmi and Heidi Klum. What's there not to like? ^_^

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On Carrie's recommendation, I have watched about two full episodes (of the British version). It is quite excellent, and Chef Ramsay makes it so. I haven't seen enough episodes to say that he never belittles anyone, but he didn't in the shows I have seen. He is an infectiously and genuinely passionate person who seeks to help others find the best in themselves.

And THAT is what struck me most. Chef Ramsay speaks to the rational and self-esteem desiring part of each person. He does it directly, firmly, sometimes angrily, but he is searching for and trying to elicit the best in those people. He is like a good coach of a sports team. He helps the people focus on their particular work, work as a team, and also gives them the larger context in which to understand their work and an ideal to shoot for.

A night out is meant to be a special, fun, and uplifting experience. People are laying down their money for that, and Chef Ramsay understands this. He also understands that the compliments and return customers can and ought to be a source of pride and enjoyment for those who work there. On an episode I saw tonight, he read comment cards to the staff which had very positive comments. The genuine looks of pride and enjoyment on the staff's faces were the proof of the lessons and values he taught them.

Chef Ramsey strikes me as a genuine person. One can understandably object to his use of profanity. However, I think that's just an incidental part of who he is. He understands the business and the people who work in it, and knows how to speak in a way that gets them to listen and think. Having worked in restaurants and seen the people on his show, I know that it is a wide-ranging group of people, many of whom are somewhat "rough" around the edges. But Chef Ramsey shows all of them how to find self-esteem through productive, hard work that is committed to excellence. I have observed how he has helped give some young people's live a real purpose. That's impressive.

Chef Ramsey is good, and I'll continue to watch this show. Thank you, Carrie!

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People are always quick to point out his abrasiveness, but they don't seem to point out that he doesn't belittle anyone or make them feel horrible for the heck of it. And the fact that he spends so much of his time out there helping restaurants, because he genuinely wants to see them succeed. Kind of like what I try to do when I tell people about Objectivist ideas. It makes feel great when I get my ideas and values out there, and contribute a little in trying to "shape the world in my values". I've seen him be genuinely, pleasantly surprised when a restaurant has maintained what they learned from him and are out of debt.

You may be right, free spirit. I haven't seen a whole show in context. I only did a youtube search and found a few clips to listen to, so I'll hold off judgment until I see the bigger picture.

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The issue here is not the good qualities of Ramsay, but the idea that if you maintain high standards in one area, you are free to sacrifice them in another. Pointing out his virtue in the kitchen (which is not in dispute) doesn't address this. That his language isn't of much consequence to some, means they don't place much value in this area. Compare his delivery with the well spoken chaps on the 'Antique Roadshow'. They are delightful to listen to - for me anyway.

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free spirit, I think what Arnold is referring to is something like this : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MB8dGQ77Zg0

I thought that was down right abusive and unnecessary. He showed the other chef no respect.

Oh gosh, this is tame compared to when he is really lighting someone's a$% on fire!

Chef Ramsay serves up plates of critical judgment hot and fast, and it scalds those can't handle it! ^_^

You have to understand that when he is prowling through these kitchens watching and observing, he is a giant of a man amongst mice, and he desperately wants to see them grow up, take responsibility, and perform on the level that they could and should.

I love watching his show, and the sheer intensity of his masculine persona is honestly quite inspiring for a man to observe.

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I think what a lot of people don't realize his how stressful it can be for a chef in a high class restaurant during peak dining hours, especially when a highly esteemed food critic is hiding amongst the guests! ^_^

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If you pay attention I'm not sure he ever actually gets angry, because he always seems to be in complete control of himself, both in terms of his actions and emotions. Here is a good example:

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The swearing is over the top; it just becomes gratuitous real quick. And I don't care for his excessive browbeating and abrasiveness; that isn't necessary to get through to people, and if you can't get through to them, screw them, don't continue to berate them on the small chance that they'll wake up.

It's not just over the top and gratuitous, it's also demeaning, bullying, belittling, extremely disrespectful and abusive.

That Gordon Ramsay is passionate about his work and that he aims for high standards is admirable, but I think it's a pity he so readily accepts and embraces such a low standard of communication in his work and life. It’s a wonder he hasn’t changed traditional names for his dishes to include profanities.

As someone who has reportedly come from a very violent and abusive home, he should understand better than most how demeaning it is to be sworn at and shoved around (as he has done.) I’m all for passion and intolerance for mediocrity, but not at the cost of civility.

Perhaps I'm over-reacting. It is television after all. But even so, it's not how I choose to be entertained.

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