Lu Norton

Marathon

14 posts in this topic

I love running. I love the feeling of the wind on my face. It doesn't matter if it's 10 degrees Fahrenheit outside or if it's 80 degrees. It's that triumphant feeling of ending an 8 mile run that makes my day.

I have never joined in any race in my life. I find running as the most selfish sports that I do. It's what I called "Lulu's" time. And I enjoy the solitude.

Last Thursday I signed up on my first marathon in Duluth, Minnesota (Grandma's). The event challenged me... 26.2 miles. I'm not joining to compete but to challenge myself and to have fun. My ultimate goal is to qualify for the Boston Marathon.

I would like to hear your marathon experience/s, if you have one. I would also like to hear your strategies and the best marathon you have ever done.

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I have never joined in any race in my life. I find running as the most selfish sports that I do. It's what I called "Lulu's" time. And I enjoy the solitude.

You mention you enjoy the solitude. What do you think about when you run?

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Last Thursday I signed up on my first marathon in Duluth, Minnesota (Grandma's). The event challenged me... 26.2 miles. I'm not joining to compete but to challenge myself and to have fun. My ultimate goal is to qualify for the Boston Marathon.

I would like to hear your marathon experience/s, if you have one. I would also like to hear your strategies and the best marathon you have ever done.

The marathon is a great test of stamina and willpower! I've run four -- two in Syracuse, NY and two in Kansas City. My best time, on a perfect spring day in Syracuse, was 2:29:02. I was in college and had time to train and take it semi-seriously.

What I found helped me to train was to run no less than fifteen miles each of two days a week, and then at least ten miles once or twice that week. I'd run those days at about the same pace as the marathon -- not trying to run harder, and making sure I had plenty left in the tank at the end of the run. As I got closer to race day, I'd do a 20-22 miler twice at the most, and within a month of the race, just to get the feel of such a long distance, and again at marathon pace. I didn't run super hard a week before the race.

The first time out, a marathon is a surreal, wonderful experience. I had run numerous 10K's and half-marathons before, so I had a good routine for pacing and keeping my mind focused (arguably the toughest part). I found out that diet a couple days before is extremely important. I was running in the days when lots of pasta/high carbs was the customary prescription, but I don't know if that still holds. Ray probably knows. I do know that having lots of fuel to burn and good hydration makes all the difference in the world.

During the race, I try to keep my splits consistent until the last couple miles. I start out easy and find a comfortable space within the pack. There are lots of distractions on a marathon course, and even with a first race, you don't want your mind to wander. You don't want to think about nothing, nor do you want to think about complicated things. What I found most helpful was to get a song that had an appealing beat running through my head, and I'd just run the beat over and over through the race. (This was pre-iPod.) It's a great timing mechanism for your pace and allows you just enough mental room to pay attention to the surroundings. When you're focused on just that, the miles seem to fly by! For the last two miles, I'd empty the tank. I don't know how well this strategy works for others, but I always felt best about going hard at the end, rather than crawling to the finish.

Since this is your first, you should pay close attention to how you're feeling every two or three miles. Be prepared to adjust your pace and mental focus on the fly. I wouldn't start out hard -- you'll be putting a fair amount of effort just into figuring out where in the pack you want to run. Take advantage of water as needed.

After the race and the day after, drink loads of water. It'll really help you recover, and you should be back to normal by the second day after the race. Definitely walk around and stretch a good bit after the race, too -- don't just hop in the car and go. After I did my first one, it was tough enough that I didn't think I'd want to do it again, but with time, you gain more confidence when that next race rolls around. As long as you what is necessary to make it fun, you'll keep coming back for more and it gets easier. Have a blast! :D

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It's funny, I first heard Rush on a Chuck episode. A few weeks ago I picked up 2112, and then Moving Pictures. I really enjoy their music.

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I love running. I love the feeling of the wind on my face. It doesn't matter if it's 10 degrees Fahrenheit outside or if it's 80 degrees. It's that triumphant feeling of ending an 8 mile run that makes my day.

I have never joined in any race in my life. I find running as the most selfish sports that I do. It's what I called "Lulu's" time. And I enjoy the solitude.

Last Thursday I signed up on my first marathon in Duluth, Minnesota (Grandma's). The event challenged me... 26.2 miles. I'm not joining to compete but to challenge myself and to have fun. My ultimate goal is to qualify for the Boston Marathon.

I would like to hear your marathon experience/s, if you have one. I would also like to hear your strategies and the best marathon you have ever done.

Here is my experience with marathons. I have run two marathons and numerous other races. Just as an aside, I certainly am not in the same league as Kurt. His time of 2:29:09 is a really good time that would have

won Boston as late as 1952 and the Olympic marathon as late as 1948.

My first marathon was the Green Mountain Island Marathon in Vermont, August of 1979. The course was

fairly flat and the weather almost perfect, rather cool. My finish time was 3:30 :23, about an eight minute

pace. By ten weeks before the race I usually ran four of five days a week. Midweek runs were 8 to 10

miles with a long run on Sunday. A long run of 16 miles became relatively easy. I finally did three

20 mile runs before the race. The 20 mile runs were never easy. I remember thinking that running

the 20 miles was twice as difficult as running 16 miles. My maximun mileage for a week was 50 miles.

Two weeks before the race I reduced my weekly mileage.

The race itself went easier than running those 20 miles. I even got my picture in The Burlington Free Press.

My next marathon was in Richmond, Virginia, October of 1979. The race started at 12:00 noon with temperature

in the mid 90's. This was not a fun run. At about the 16 mile point there was long hill and a sign that read

"Lee's Revenge". I walked most of that hill. My finish time was 3:48:06.

My best race was a half marathon in Manchester, Vermont, September of 1981. My finish time was 1:32:49

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I like sawanobori. After years of traversing the tributaries to their sources and observing the environment they flow in, the routes can be turned into sawanobori marathons because of that intimate knowledge.

There are two types of sawanobori marathons - with or without backpack (leave at the bottom of the water source). I can carry up to 25 lbs. and the with-backpack option greatly increases the number of possible routes and provides dry clothing.

Keeping up body heat can be a challenge with the cooling effect of water. I have not tried sawanobori on frozen waterfalls. Speed in ascent requires very specific knowledge of the terrain, rope and harness usage, and adjusting one's pace on non-waterfall terrain to recoup time lost with the loss/gain of previously available footholds due to water erosion. The more flexible you are the better. The focus needed to ascend rapidly and safely, and timing breathing to avoid inhaling water droplets is very relaxing. To train, ascend the terrain surrounding the waterfalls only with full water containers attached to the pack, and empty before descending. Increase the pace gradually. If training 2 days a week, and if one is an intermediate hiker, one is ready to move to training in the water after 2 months. Ascending in the water should be no more than 2 days a week due to impact of water on one's body, and increase the pace over the span of a month. Increased tactile sensitivity and overall agility are just some of the benefits. I need plenty of water and hot carb-loaded food.

In North America very few people enjoy nature and endurance sports this way so it is an excellent pasttime for solitude.

I would also like to read about anybody's ice skating marathons. I prefer sawanobori and ice skating over running marathons since neither are high impact.

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The first time out, a marathon is a surreal, wonderful experience. I had run numerous 10K's and half-marathons before, so I had a good routine for pacing and keeping my mind focused (arguably the toughest part). I found out that diet a couple days before is extremely important. I was running in the days when lots of pasta/high carbs was the customary prescription, but I don't know if that still holds. Ray probably knows. I do know that having lots of fuel to burn and good hydration makes all the difference in the world.

After the race and the day after, drink loads of water. It'll really help you recover, and you should be back to normal by the second day after the race. Definitely walk around and stretch a good bit after the race, too -- don't just hop in the car and go. After I did my first one, it was tough enough that I didn't think I'd want to do it again, but with time, you gain more confidence when that next race rolls around. As long as you what is necessary to make it fun, you'll keep coming back for more and it gets easier. Have a blast! :D

During steady state activity (which long distance running obviously is) a humans metabolism works in a way as to conserve fat and use glucose, glycogen, muscle/protein (catabolism of one's own muscle) and finally fat, in this specific order. There is no way to change this order nor to control what source one uses as long as one keeps the activity at a steady state. So, carbohydrates are important if the runner does not want to burn their own muscle as energy. The problem is that a person cannot hold large amounts of glycogen (stored glucose) in their muscles at one time. The average human can only hold about 200 grams of carbohydrates in their muscles on a day to day basis. The average human can also hold another 70 grams of carbohydrates in their liver, but this is usually for fasting while we sleep. Two hundred grams of carbohydrates only equals about 800 calories, but the average person can only take in about 500 calories at one time before the extra calories are turned into fat. The average person can run for around 3 hours before they begin to run out of glucose, glycogen and energy from muslce and start to draw on the energy from fat. I would advise that if your running more than two hours (and your are able to do so) that you take in a carbohydrate drink or food of some sort to fuel you through the remainder of the run. One of the best drinks for a boost of energy that will last for a good amount of time is chocolate milk. That is right, not gatorade nor any other expensive "exercise," "energy" drink, just plain old cheap chocolate milk.

There is no specific benefit to stretching, it does not speed up recuperation nor keep injuries from happening. Although stretching can cause the release of hormones that act like pain killers which is why some people state they feel better if they stretch. The best way to feel better after a run of this nature is to give the body time to heal which means rest. Animals (including humans) recuperation is tied to their metabolism. And metabolisms our tied to the animal's cardio-respiratory which is tied to the animals ability to weed off the toxins caused from all the activity through the blood and to the liver. If a person could truly speed up their recuperation/metabolism by stretching or any other form of activity they would actually be speeding up their death. So, be ready to feel sore, take some pain killer, or not, and relax, then go do it again if you so desire.

When running immense distances or very short distances I have found that calling/singing cadence in my head or to my troops always helped to make the distance go by without focusing on the discomfort or miles left. I would offer that you pick some songs that you enjoy and that will keep in tune with your steps and just keep repeating them as you go. Some enjoyful and some what funny, examples of the types of cadences I/we would sing while running in the Marine Corps follow:

In My Marines

In my marines the color is red,

to show the world the blood we shed.

In my my marines the color is blue,

to show the world that we are true.

In my marines the color is green,

to show the world that we are mean

PT Ghost

When I die, please bury me deep!

Place an M16 down by my feet!

Don't cry for me, dont shed no tear!

Just pack my box with PT gear!

'Cuz early one mornin', 'bout zero-five!

The ground's gunna rumble, there'll be lightning in the sky!

Don't you worry, don't come undone!

It's just my ghost on a PT run!!

I Can Run To Hades

I can run to Hades like this

All the way to Hades like this

And when I get to Hades his demons will say

How you get to Hades in just one day?

I reply with a little bit of anger

Blood and guts and a little bit of danger

I can run to Iraq like this

All the way to Iraq like this

And when I get to Iraq Osama will say

How you get to Iraq in just one day

I reply with a little bit of anger

Blood and guts and a little bit of danger

I can run to Russia like this

All the way to Russia like this

And when I get to Russia Ivan will say

How you get to Russia in just one day

I reply with a little bit of anger

Blood and guts and a little bit of danger

Hey Navy

Navy, Navy, I'm in doubt

Why your bellies are sticking out

Is it whiskey or is it wine

Or is it lack of PT time?

Navy, Navy, where you at

Come on out and lose the fat

Don't be scared and don't be blue

Popeye was a sissy too

Moto, moto, got a lot of motivation

Dedi, dedi, go a lot of dedication

Motivation, Dedication

To the Corps, our Corps, your Corps

my Corps, Marine Corps

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a huge mistake will be to overtrain by running too many miles leading up to the race. you will wear out your body or end up not mentally fresh for the race.

i found that following bowerman's / oregon duck training scheme worked the best for me for marathon training: 45-50 miles a week, training as if for a 10K, including hard interval training at a much faster pace than the marathon run.

a month before the marathon, i'd run one 10 miler as hard as i could - at a much faster pace than the marathon pace- and a 15-17 miler at faster than marathon pace just to get the feel of running for a longer time / hydrating / pre and post race toilet activity.

when you train at a much faster than maraton pace, the marathon run will literally feel like you're walking for the first 12-15 miles. running longer, slower-paced runs in training backfired for me.

ditto with the pasta loading - it backfired for me.

caffeine can be your friend! (i believe it helps metabolize fat, but i'm not sure) i backed off it for a several days before the race, then stoked up the morning of the race. my best time (at boston) included a beer along frat row (about mile 15??), which is against all advice. go figure....

i found that tapering off beginning a week before the race was best. i only ran a few gentle miles once or twice in the week before the race and took 2-3 days completely off before a race.

with all that rest and lots of coffee, i'd feel like the hulk or rambo or rocky on the starting line.....ready to get it on with mr. t.

have fun!!!!!

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When running immense distances or very short distances I have found that calling/singing cadence in my head or to my troops always helped to make the distance go by without focusing on the discomfort or miles left. I would offer that you pick some songs that you enjoy and that will keep in tune with your steps and just keep repeating them as you go. Some enjoyful and some what funny, examples of the types of cadences I/we would sing while running in the Marine Corps follow:

In My Marines

In my marines the color is red,

to show the world the blood we shed.

In my my marines the color is blue,

to show the world that we are true.

In my marines the color is green,

to show the world that we are mean

HOOrah!

ruveyn

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When running immense distances or very short distances I have found that calling/singing cadence in my head or to my troops always helped to make the distance go by without focusing on the discomfort or miles left. I would offer that you pick some songs that you enjoy and that will keep in tune with your steps and just keep repeating them as you go. Some enjoyful and some what funny, examples of the types of cadences I/we would sing while running in the Marine Corps follow:

In My Marines

In my marines the color is red,

to show the world the blood we shed.

In my my marines the color is blue,

to show the world that we are true.

In my marines the color is green,

to show the world that we are mean

HOOrah!

ruveyn

I am glad you liked it.

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