Betsy Speicher

Big Girl Baking Company

17 posts in this topic

Forum member Regina Milano (profile) started a bakery with her sisters and yesterday they were featured in the New York Times (link).

Big Girl Baking: Family Recipe for Success

FLORENCE FABRICANT

Published: February 17, 2009

18bigg_650.jpg

Aimee, Regina and Jody Milano all left corporate jobs to bake together, something the sisters had done while growing up in Yonkers.

Now, their company, Big Girl Baking in Bronxville, N.Y., turns out buttery, homey cookies like chocolate mocha chip or ginger and black forest chunk.

Their chocolate shortbreads (sables du chocolate) are dense and their biscotti are more tender than crisp, thanks to cornmeal in the dough. Most of the cookies, sold at biggirlbaking.com, are $17 to $18 a pound.

They also bake small, ethereally light pecan crusted cheesecakes, $3 each, which can be delivered in New York City and in southern Westchester County (they are too delicate for shipping).

They can be ordered by calling (877) 721-3644 or via the Web site.

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Wonderful!! Congratulations :lol:

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Their stuff looks good. I wonder why American cooks always feel the need to use some pseudo-French, when most of the time they don't speak the language. I often find restaurants who try to be sophisticated in their menue and misspell a foreign language or write something that sounds awkward.

E.g., I suppose "Sables du chocolat" is meant to sound French. My apologies if it isn't, but if it is, it translates as "Shortbreads of the chocolate", which sounds weird to me.

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If I got near that food, it would be BIG BOY eating. The more I ate the bigger the boy.

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Congratulations to Regina and her sisters and I hope their company grows in the direction that they desire.

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Their stuff looks good. I wonder why American cooks always feel the need to use some pseudo-French, when most of the time they don't speak the language. I often find restaurants who try to be sophisticated in their menue and misspell a foreign language or write something that sounds awkward.

E.g., I suppose "Sables du chocolat" is meant to sound French. My apologies if it isn't, but if it is, it translates as "Shortbreads of the chocolate", which sounds weird to me.

Joss,

I'm ignorant of the French language. So, what's the correct way to say "chocolate shortbreads" in French? I thought that the above way was correct based on my little knowledge.

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E.g., I suppose "Sables du chocolat" is meant to sound French. My apologies if it isn't, but if it is, it translates as "Shortbreads of the chocolate", which sounds weird to me.

...what's the correct way to say "chocolate shortbreads" in French? I thought that the above way was correct based on my little knowledge.

"Sablés au chocolat"

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First, my heatfelt thanks to Betsy for posting this! Next, the use of the word "sables" (French for sand) refers to a particular type of shortbread-like cookie that is French in its origins. Did you ever eat pecan sandies when you were a kid? Roughly, "Sables du chocolat" translates to "chocolate sandies." And, sacre bleu! They are damned good!

All the best,

Regina

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Roughly, "Sables du chocolat" translates to "chocolate sandies."

No, it translates as "sandies of the chocolate".

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Roughly, "Sables du chocolat" translates to "chocolate sandies."

No, it translates as "sandies of the chocolate".

Take it from, Joss. He is from France.

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Take it from, Joss. He is from France.

That should be: "Take it from Joss."

Edit: removed apostrophe.

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Roughly, "Sables du chocolat" translates to "chocolate sandies."

No, it translates as "sandies of the chocolate".

So the obvious question is, how would you say chocolate sandies in French (as close as you could get)?

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Roughly, "Sables du chocolat" translates to "chocolate sandies."

No, it translates as "sandies of the chocolate".

So the obvious question is, how would you say chocolate sandies in French (as close as you could get)?

Sablés au chocolat

You could also say "Sablés chocolat", which would be understood.

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I think the courage and optimism in the face of economic disaster that it takes to open a quality mail-order cookie concern are being diluted by the French issue. Such trivialities, and it's a trivial issue since the US food industry seems to have its own take on French, should be addressed in either a PM or in a separate thread.

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