Carlos

You used what??

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...at least using Firefox on a Mac.

You were using a Mac?? ;)

He used to use a Trash-80 ;) , but the comments on the web pages past 4 do not display at all, even if you reverse the order to "newest first" to try to retrieve the lastest ones.

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He used to use a Trash-80 ;)

TRS-80. : p

I never had the pleasure of using 80 column punch cards like the *real* old timers, wasn't that painful? ;)

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...at least using Firefox on a Mac.

You were using a Mac?? ;)

Note that it's not working for him, though. ( These machines know, PhilO. And what they don't know, Steve tells them!)

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I never had the pleasure of using 80 column punch cards like the *real* old timers, wasn't that painful? ;)

I did. It was.

I even used paper tape in a summer course I took while still in high school.

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He used to use a Trash-80 ;)

TRS-80. : p

I never had the pleasure of using 80 column punch cards like the *real* old timers, wasn't that painful? ;)

I suppose it would have been painful for accessing web pages through a 300 baud modem. I once encountered someone who was quite proud of the fact that he could interpret punch cards from the punched holes alone, without the printed characters at the top of the card.

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He used to use a Trash-80 ;)

TRS-80. : p

I never had the pleasure of using 80 column punch cards like the *real* old timers, wasn't that painful? :D

I suppose it would have been painful for accessing web pages through a 300 baud modem. I once encountered someone who was quite proud of the fact that he could interpret punch cards from the punched holes alone, without the printed characters at the top of the card.

Sounds like he "wasn't all there." ;)

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He used to use a Trash-80 ;)

TRS-80. : p

I never had the pleasure of using 80 column punch cards like the *real* old timers, wasn't that painful? ;)

I suppose it would have been painful for accessing web pages through a 300 baud modem. I once encountered someone who was quite proud of the fact that he could interpret punch cards from the punched holes alone, without the printed characters at the top of the card.

What would he do if there were hanging chads?

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He used to use a Trash-80 ;)

TRS-80. : p

I never had the pleasure of using 80 column punch cards like the *real* old timers, wasn't that painful? ;)

It wasn't so much the punch cards as having to submit the stack of cards to the computer operator and then having to wait 2 or 3 days for the main frame to compile your program, then run it, then print it. And then only to find out that either the cards were not in the correct order, or a card got mangled in the reader, or you typed in the wrong character and had to resubmit the deck to rerun the program. Not to mention that programs had "priority" and even if you submitted your stack 2 days ago, it may have been interrupted by a program with a higher priority: so you wait, and wait, and wait.

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You have not really programmed a computer until you have loaded the accumulator via the front panel switches...

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You have not really programmed a computer until you have loaded the accumulator via the front panel switches...

I've done that, too.

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I once encountered someone who was quite proud of the fact that he could interpret punch cards from the punched holes alone, without the printed characters at the top of the card.

I could! I worked my way through college as a keypunch girl punching holes in IBM cards.

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It wasn't so much the punch cards as having to submit the stack of cards to the computer operator and then having to wait 2 or 3 days for the main frame to compile your program, then run it, then print it. And then only to find out that either the cards were not in the correct order, or a card got mangled in the reader, or you typed in the wrong character and had to resubmit the deck to rerun the program. Not to mention that programs had "priority" and even if you submitted your stack 2 days ago, it may have been interrupted by a program with a higher priority: so you wait, and wait, and wait.

Boy, does that bring back memories!

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You have not really programmed a computer until you have loaded the accumulator via the front panel switches...

Or entered your program via the only input device: the console typewriter.

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It wasn't so much the punch cards as having to submit the stack of cards to the computer operator and then having to wait 2 or 3 days for the main frame to compile your program, then run it, then print it. And then only to find out that either the cards were not in the correct order, or a card got mangled in the reader, or you typed in the wrong character and had to resubmit the deck to rerun the program. Not to mention that programs had "priority" and even if you submitted your stack 2 days ago, it may have been interrupted by a program with a higher priority: so you wait, and wait, and wait.

Boy, does that bring back memories!

This reminds me of the stories my mom always told me about her job in college. She was at Purdue in the early 70s and she womaned the giant mulit-room computer for work; placing stacks of cards in the reader... or was it sheets of something? Anyway, she always mentions the day she accidentally dropped some poor guys research project on the floor! It scattered everywhere!

Also, it must be amazing for those of you who've watched this technology develop in such a short time span. I mean, I remember the birth of personal computers (I was born in 81) but that's not nearly as drastic a change as what you old fogies must've seen. ;) I was watching a show on Jay Leno's website just today (he's an avid automobile collector) on steam cars. It really gave me a new appreciation for my old 98 Mercury beater I own. I almost feel privileged to be able to own such technology. (However, I do find those steam cars mechanically elegant and the neatest things I've seen in years! They're like trains without tracks!)

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He used to use a Trash-80 ;)

TRS-80. : p

I never had the pleasure of using 80 column punch cards like the *real* old timers, wasn't that painful? ;)

It wasn't so much the punch cards as having to submit the stack of cards to the computer operator and then having to wait 2 or 3 days for the main frame to compile your program, then run it, then print it. And then only to find out that either the cards were not in the correct order, or a card got mangled in the reader, or you typed in the wrong character and had to resubmit the deck to rerun the program. Not to mention that programs had "priority" and even if you submitted your stack 2 days ago, it may have been interrupted by a program with a higher priority: so you wait, and wait, and wait.

Normally it was only an hour or so, but big programs would run overnight. The real delays for days were in places where union rules required that programmers give the code to a unionized make-work middleman to punch the cards. If that situation had prevailed we would all still be waiting for DOS 1.0.

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He used to use a Trash-80 ;)

TRS-80. : p

I never had the pleasure of using 80 column punch cards like the *real* old timers, wasn't that painful? ;)

I suppose it would have been painful for accessing web pages through a 300 baud modem. I once encountered someone who was quite proud of the fact that he could interpret punch cards from the punched holes alone, without the printed characters at the top of the card.

What would he do if there were hanging chads?

Interpretation on the basis of intent was allowed.

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This reminds me of the stories my mom always told me about her job in college. She was at Purdue in the early 70s and she womaned the giant mulit-room computer for work; placing stacks of cards in the reader... or was it sheets of something? Anyway, she always mentions the day she accidentally dropped some poor guys research project on the floor! It scattered everywhere!

I once lost a program with thousands of cards by leaving it on top of the car and absent-mindedly driving off.

I also once caught a student in a summer job who dropped a deck of cards, furtively looked around to see if anyone was watching, and then stuck the cards back in the deck randomly, hoping that no one would realize his involvement in the corrupted program.

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Here's the computer I remember using back in my college days, circa 1973. (Not that "I" used it. I gave the punch cards to the operator who was inside a locked room.)

The 1108 II System is an extremely flexible, modularly constructed system that enables a precise blend of system components to meet the exact speed and capacity requirements of your specific applications. It can include up to three central processors, up to two input/output controllers, and a main storage expandable in 65,538 word increments up to 262,144 36-bit words. Besides overlapped and interleaved access to main storage, it includes redundancy between components, dynamic program address relocation, and the capability of directly addressing 6, 9, 12, 18-bit word-portions, as well as full-word (36-bits) and double-word (72-bits)
http://tinyurl.com/csdmuh

WOW WEE.

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I never had the pleasure of using 80 column punch cards like the *real* old timers, wasn't that painful? :D

Actually, it wasn't so bad. :D In fact, when first learning to use a computer, the cards sort of facilitated the process. No text editor or interactive commands to learn. Just punch your program on cards and hand them to the operator. Primitive, but easy for a beginner.

My school had a DEC PDP-10 with 192K of 36-bit words. (And this was the old KA-10 processor, which means it used discrete transistors. A book that I now have gives its instruction speed as about 0.38 MIPS.) Primitive by today's standards, but it sure seemed fast to me at the time.

Access was via punched card decks or else the old ASR-33 electro-mechanical 110-baud teletype machines. Usually we got pretty good turnaround for short programs on cards - typically less than 1/2 hour. We had to buy our own cards, so changing a line of code cost money. (So did putting in comment cards; which on my freshman budget I decided were a waste of money. ;) )

At my next school, they had a CDC-Cyber-something-or-other - also with a card reader. My first quarter, I was so busy that I didn't have time to learn the much-nicer interactive system. But I got to be pretty good at maximizing my throughput using cards - my methodology being to go into the computing center with two or three programs to work on. Punch one up, submit it to the operator, and then go work on punching another program. By the time you're ready with a new card deck for prorgam B, the printout for program A should be ready.

Those old IBM 029 cardpunches were fun to use too. You could use their "duplicate" function to "edit" a card, by using your thumb to stop the progress of one card while you advance the other card, maybe typing one or more characters. And then there were characters that were too weird for the cardpunch to know about (such as a square bracket), so you had to manually "multipunch" the character code in - which showed as a blob of ink on the card, but if you got it right, the correct character would print when you got your listing. :D

Never dropped a deck. Really. A few years later at work, we were still using punch cards - partly because the computer operating system we used was so primitive that it would have been very easy to accidentally delete a source file stored on disk. Easier to be careful and just not drop the cards.

Never used paper tape, but heard stories about it. Like when you'd be almost finished reading in a big well-used roll of tape, and it would rip. ;)

One thing about those old systems: there were no viruses to worry about!

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One thing about those old systems: there were no viruses to worry about!

They came with viruses built in. The disk crash virus, the paper tape tear virus, etc.

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