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#1 bborg

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Posted 30 March 2009 - 01:20 PM

Here are some of the drawings I've done.

This was actually my saxophone. ;)
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An unfinished attempt at a portrait.
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During my "hand phase". ;)
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This was my grandparents' beach house at Edisto, South Carolina.
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Portrait of a friend of mine. I don't have it anymore, so I wish I'd taken a good photo instead of scanning it.
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I'm hoping that at some point in the near future I'll have a new one to post. I started a new portrait last year, but didn't complete it. I've resumed working on it, on and off.

#2 B. Royce

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Posted 30 March 2009 - 03:43 PM

Fine work, Bryson. Especially powerful is your friend's face. What intensity you have put into her expression with the head slightly tilted forward and the oh, so intense eyes. A real pleasure to look at. The saxophone is a happy picture, music sheets ready to spread their wings! I like the hand, though more the idea than the execution. The portrait has possibilities, the house is simply what it is, unpretenscious. Thanks so much for sharing and I wish you joy in your new drawing.

#3 free spirit

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Posted 30 March 2009 - 04:03 PM

Those drawings are incredible. Thank you for posting them.
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#4 Thales

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Posted 30 March 2009 - 05:26 PM

I like those renderings, Bryson. I'm doing some pencil drawing myself, so I appreciate what that takes.

The saxophone is the best one from a stylistic point of view. I love the detail on the surface of the hand.

#5 bborg

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Posted 30 March 2009 - 08:34 PM

Thank you for the comments, I'm very glad that people enjoyed these. ;)

Fine work, Bryson. Especially powerful is your friend's face. What intensity you have put into her expression with the head slightly tilted forward and the oh, so intense eyes. A real pleasure to look at. The saxophone is a happy picture, music sheets ready to spread their wings! I like the hand, though more the idea than the execution. The portrait has possibilities, the house is simply what it is, unpretenscious. Thanks so much for sharing and I wish you joy in your new drawing.

Yes, her expression is very intense in the drawing. I actually don't know how conscious that was. I think when I look at something to draw, I'm already only seeing what I want to draw. If I can train myself to call more conscious attention to what I've selected maybe that will take me to another level. But anyway, the finished product was a little surprising to me. I find myself feeling pulled in by her eyes, which is an effect I never achieved with my other drawings.

I really like how the saxophone came out. It was one of the few charcoal drawings I ever did, and the only one I liked.

Those drawings are incredible. Thank you for posting them.

I'm flattered, thank you. ;) And you're very welcome.

I like those renderings, Bryson. I'm doing some pencil drawing myself, so I appreciate what that takes.

The saxophone is the best one from a stylistic point of view. I love the detail on the surface of the hand.

The hand is a bit screwy, looking at it now, but it was a big step for me. My task was to learn how to give my drawings more depth, instead of just an outline with gratuitous shading inside. I've never sculpted before, but I imagine that working with objects on paper is similar in a way, because with every pencil stroke you chip away, giving the image an illusion of the shape you choose.

#6 Betsy Speicher

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Posted 30 March 2009 - 08:41 PM

I like the stylization using carefully selected lines to emphasize the curvy shapes of the saxophone and the casually open sheets of music in a composition that says "Music is fun!"

I'm also impressed by the deliberately dramatic shading of the Einstein portrait that makes it a work of art and not just a photographic rendering. Stephen collected Einstein things and he would have loved it.
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#7 bborg

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Posted 30 March 2009 - 10:49 PM

I like the stylization using carefully selected lines to emphasize the curvy shapes of the saxophone and the casually open sheets of music in a composition that says "Music is fun!"

That's the one thing about charcoal, is you do have to choose your lines carefully. This was my choice of still life in a class I took. Well, I use "class" loosely, there was no instruction we just had a series of drawing activities. I don't recall, though, whether it was my idea to have the music displayed that way or the teacher/sponsor's. I agree it makes the music look very inviting, though.

I'm also impressed by the deliberately dramatic shading of the Einstein portrait that makes it a work of art and not just a photographic rendering. Stephen collected Einstein things and he would have loved it.

Thank you. ;)

#8 Mercury

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Posted 31 March 2009 - 03:00 AM

These are very interesting, Bryson, thanks for sharing.

#9 Rose Lake

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Posted 31 March 2009 - 05:07 AM

I like the hand attempt best, I think because of the detail that is shown by the intricate shading. What is that in the hand? A sea shell? I won't try to evaluate Einstein since it's not done -- but why not finish it? It looks like it might be very good if/when it's finished. Next I like the portrait of your friend, because it's arresting, then the sax, then the house. It all seems pretty good to me -- non-artist's opinion.
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#10 bborg

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Posted 31 March 2009 - 11:15 AM

I like the hand attempt best, I think because of the detail that is shown by the intricate shading. What is that in the hand? A sea shell?

It was a marble.

I won't try to evaluate Einstein since it's not done -- but why not finish it? It looks like it might be very good if/when it's finished. Next I like the portrait of your friend, because it's arresting, then the sax, then the house. It all seems pretty good to me -- non-artist's opinion.

Thanks. I lost interest in the Einstein portrait. That's been a problem for me and drawing forever. I think I've had more aborted projects than completed ones.

#11 Mac

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Posted 01 April 2009 - 03:55 PM

Bryson,

Your Einstein. Some subtle shading here. I can't quite tell your technique and that's a plus. Your outline drawing left as is emphasizes your portrait.

I like your Hand drawing. The artist always has himself available for a model. I particularly like the metal wires and their insertions into the spine of your background drawing of the sketch book. This is tedious work, the kind of tedium this artist enjoys.

The Saxophone. You got lucky with the background sheet music; or else someone did a good job of making it look random Nice drawing there. And the saxophone: You're using white colored pencil or opaque watercolor here for highlights? Very fine.

Your Portrait of a Friend. Most ambitious. Hair is so difficult. You've pulled it off well. Again I like your outlines in the dress, around and inside of the face.

Your grandparents' beach house. My favorite. There is a wind; that's for sure. The bench on the porch. The steps. The flag. A basket or pot on the porch. TV Antenna. Windows; and one boarded up window. Individual brick in the chimney. The very high grass-like stems. The awnings. Looks like a room in the back indicated on the left of the house. The house's boarding and roofing. All this there is to see. And a feeling of good and interesting people who live in this place, in this house.

Thank you Bryson for your views.

Robert



#12 bborg

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Posted 01 April 2009 - 04:55 PM

I greatly appreciate the comments, Robert. ;)

Bryson,

Your Einstein. Some subtle shading here. I can't quite tell your technique and that's a plus. Your outline drawing left as is emphasizes your portrait.

That's part of why I liked it enough to post, even though it was unfinished.

I like your Hand drawing. The artist always has himself available for a model. I particularly like the metal wires and their insertions into the spine of your background drawing of the sketch book. This is tedious work, the kind of tedium this artist enjoys.

I'm glad you noticed that! The pad in the background was a bit of silliness on my part. I wanted to give the impression that this was me studying my hand before drawing it.

The Saxophone. You got lucky with the background sheet music; or else someone did a good job of making it look random Nice drawing there. And the saxophone: You're using white colored pencil or opaque watercolor here for highlights? Very fine.

Actually, it's just glare from the camera flash. ;) It's tough to take a decent picture in my apartment.

Your Portrait of a Friend. Most ambitious. Hair is so difficult. You've pulled it off well. Again I like your outlines in the dress, around and inside of the face.

I took the hair for granted until I sat down to actually draw it. I decided rather than focus on the strands I'd focus on the way the light plays off of them. I can't say I was completely satisfied with the result, but it was my best attempt.

Your grandparents' beach house. My favorite. There is a wind; that's for sure. The bench on the porch. The steps. The flag. A basket or pot on the porch. TV Antenna. Windows; and one boarded up window. Individual brick in the chimney. The very high grass-like stems. The awnings. Looks like a room in the back indicated on the left of the house. The house's boarding and roofing. All this there is to see. And a feeling of good and interesting people who live in this place, in this house.

I sat in a chair out in the sand for hours to draw this one. I can't really even remember the house anymore, when I think of it I see this drawing and I feel the heat and the sun and the cool air coming off the sea behind me. And the occasional passerby looking to see what I was doing.

Incidentally, and maybe you're the same way because you're self-taught, but one of the things I love about drawing is the puzzle of how to do it. Like with the hair. I can't just sit and draw. Sometimes I don't even know how the devil I'm supposed to draw something, and have to figure it out. But when I get stuck it can be very frustrating, and I frustrate easily.

I've resumed that drawing from last year, and gotten over one of those frustrations. I think it's going to be a great one, if I don't screw it up. :D

#13 bborg

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Posted 11 April 2009 - 11:17 PM

Here is my new drawing. It's a portrait of my dad.

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#14 Betsy Speicher

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Posted 11 April 2009 - 11:37 PM

Here is my new drawing. It's a portrait of my dad.

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Your drawing certainly conveys his personality and I also see a family resemblance.
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#15 B. Royce

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Posted 12 April 2009 - 03:12 AM

Excellent clarity and depth. Eyes closed; interesting.

#16 bborg

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Posted 12 April 2009 - 03:36 AM

Your drawing certainly conveys his personality and I also see a family resemblance.

I was very happy with the result, because I do think it conveys his personality. The drawing is modeled after a photo I really like, taken on Christmas morning a couple years ago.

Excellent clarity and depth. Eyes closed; interesting.

Thank you. Actually his eyes are supposed to be open very slightly, and I had a lot of trouble with that. Sometimes when I look at it they appear open, and sometimes they appear closed. He is looking in the direction of the hand I suggested but didn't draw.

#17 B. Royce

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Posted 12 April 2009 - 01:45 PM

Your drawing certainly conveys his personality and I also see a family resemblance.

I was very happy with the result, because I do think it conveys his personality. The drawing is modeled after a photo I really like, taken on Christmas morning a couple years ago.

Excellent clarity and depth. Eyes closed; interesting.

Thank you. Actually his eyes are supposed to be open very slightly, and I had a lot of trouble with that. Sometimes when I look at it they appear open, and sometimes they appear closed. He is looking in the direction of the hand I suggested but didn't draw.


Actually, I should have put a question mark after "eyes closed", because I got the impression that maybe they were slightly open, after all.

#18 Mac

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Posted 17 April 2009 - 04:45 PM

I can't just sit and draw. Sometimes I don't even know how the devil I'm supposed to draw something.


You don't have to know. Not all the way down. Your drawing will, if it's an important subject to you, "draw itself". That is to say, your subject has to matter to you. It must come from your "sense of life". And given your skills much of the rest of your work will be more subconscious than consciously done.

#19 Mac

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Posted 17 April 2009 - 04:56 PM

Here is my new drawing. It's a portrait of my dad.


See, this is what I mean by your technical skill "drawing itself". The subject matters to you and it comes across.

I love the detail, the intricacy in the shirt. Your outline work. Shading and texture in the beard and hair.

Very fine. I like the pose and your father's interests and in the end the way you've captured it all in pencil.

#20 bborg

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Posted 19 April 2009 - 05:08 AM

See, this is what I mean by your technical skill "drawing itself". The subject matters to you and it comes across.

I love the detail, the intricacy in the shirt. Your outline work. Shading and texture in the beard and hair.

Very fine. I like the pose and your father's interests and in the end the way you've captured it all in pencil.

Thanks! Actually I think my difficulty maintaining interest has a lot to do with my skill still developing. I can see what you mean about it "drawing itself", but most of the work for me still requires a lot of conscious effort. As I learn it does become easier, and the lines become more confident. And I develop techniques to meet challenges, which I can reapply later. But I need that "what for" to keep me going, not the mere challenge but having a subject I want to draw. So I completely agree with that. :rolleyes: But maybe as I get better I won't need such a strong motivation in order to produce something good.




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