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Mispronunciations


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#21 piz

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Posted 26 April 2011 - 11:48 PM

My pronunciation pet peeve would be using the regular "the" even when the following word starts with a vowel sound. "Thuh egg" or "thuh orange". I was taught that you should use "thee" in such cases.

I don't remember being taught that, but now that I think about it that's how I pronounce it: "thee egg" or "thee orange." I tried to force "thuh" for them and it sounded and felt unnatural.
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#22 Capitalism Forever

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Posted 27 April 2011 - 06:23 AM

What about words that start with the ē sound? Do you say "the evening" or "thē evening?"

The latter.

There is no way to derive an ought a shalst from an is.


#23 L-C

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Posted 28 April 2011 - 12:35 AM

What about words that start with the ē sound? Do you say "the evening" or "thē evening?"


The former. This is the exception.

#24 TheOtherJake

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Posted 28 April 2011 - 01:02 PM

The former. This is the exception.

That's what I was thinking. The Japanese would have no problem with consecutive ē sounds, because they're used to distinguishing single and double vowels (ie = house, iie = no / o = small, oo = big) or putting glottal stops between vowels, but English speakers are not used to that and need the "uh" to hear the ē as a separate sound.

#25 Paul's Here

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Posted 29 April 2011 - 06:47 AM

The only time I consciously use 'thē' is when emphasizing something. I never heard of using it before vowels. I have no problem saying "give me 'thuh' egg or 'thuh' onion. Does not sound strange to me at all.
ANTHEM
"It is my eyes which see,
and the sight of my eyes grants beauty to the earth.


It is my ears which hear,
and the hearing of my ears gives its song to the world.


It is my mind which thinks,
and the judgment of my mind is the only searchlight that can find the truth."


---------

"Life, if well spent, is long." - Leonardo

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(Avatar shows the Milky Way and our place in it.)

#26 Paul's Here

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Posted 29 April 2011 - 06:52 AM

I do have a problem with 'Give me the thing that thee thought was the thorniest and thickest thicket."
ANTHEM
"It is my eyes which see,
and the sight of my eyes grants beauty to the earth.


It is my ears which hear,
and the hearing of my ears gives its song to the world.


It is my mind which thinks,
and the judgment of my mind is the only searchlight that can find the truth."


---------

"Life, if well spent, is long." - Leonardo

--------------------
(Avatar shows the Milky Way and our place in it.)

#27 Dave K

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Posted 29 April 2011 - 05:04 PM

I do have a problem with 'Give me the thing that thee thought was the thorniest and thickest thicket."


. . . or, Theopholus Thistle thrust three thousand thistles through the thick of his thumb.

#28 B. Royce

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Posted 29 April 2011 - 06:45 PM

Or, I give thee the easy thicket; the even edges of it are soft as the shadows of the evening sky.

#29 piz

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Posted 29 April 2011 - 07:25 PM

Mine tend to run together a bit: I say "the egg" as "th' egg." But if I consciously separate them, it's definitely "thee" that's comfortable for me.
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#30 BillPennock

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Posted 30 April 2011 - 01:11 AM

Ok how about continually leaving off the g in "ing". It kills me that the President does this all the time. "I need to be worrin' about more important issues"

#31 piz

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Posted 30 April 2011 - 02:20 AM

Ok how about continually leaving off the g in "ing". It kills me that the President does this all the time. "I need to be worrin' about more important issues"

Is that specific example really linguistic laziness? Or could it be a regional thing?

In general I agree, although it bothers me far more in public speaking than in day to day conversation.

BTW, I enjoy the opposite, emphasizing the 'g' - it's somehow endearing. I hear it primarily in certain British dialects. For example I recall hearing the Beatles, especially Ringo, pronouncing "ing" with a 'g' like in "gone" at the end. Or in the movie Help when George exclaims about "an evil, fiendish thinGie!"
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#32 BillPennock

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Posted 30 April 2011 - 02:36 AM

Ok how about continually leaving off the g in "ing". It kills me that the President does this all the time. "I need to be worrin' about more important issues"

Is that specific example really linguistic laziness? Or could it be a regional thing?

In general I agree, although it bothers me far more in public speaking than in day to day conversation.

BTW, I enjoy the opposite, emphasizing the 'g' - it's somehow endearing. I hear it primarily in certain British dialects. For example I recall hearing the Beatles, especially Ringo, pronouncing "ing" with a 'g' like in "gone" at the end. Or in the movie Help when George exclaims about "an evil, fiendish thinGie!"

I've often wondered if the President uses it to try to sound "down home". I'm not sure I remember hearing the lack of G in Chicago or Illinois especially but I'm with you regarding the difference between hearing it in day to day conversation and public speaking. I'm not sure I'd even notice it in day to day.

#33 Dave K

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Posted 30 April 2011 - 05:27 PM

I do have a problem with 'Give me the thing that thee thought was the thorniest and thickest thicket."


. . . or, Theopholus Thistle thrust three thousand thistles through the thick of his thumb.



Geez, I got my own tongue twister wrong, it should be: Theopholus Thistle, a successful thistle sifter, thrust three thousand thistles through the thick of his thumb.

#34 Dave K

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Posted 30 April 2011 - 05:30 PM

I do have a problem with 'Give me the thing that thee thought was the thorniest and thickest thicket."


. . . or, Theopholus Thistle thrust three thousand thistles through the thick of his thumb.



Geez, I got my own tongue twister wrong, it should be: Theopholus Thistle, a successful thistle sifter, thrust three thousand thistles through the thick of his thumb.


Double geez I still got it wrong - is there an edit function?
One more (last) time: Theopholus Thistle, a successful thistle sifter, while sifting a sea of unsifted thistles thrust three thousand thistles through the thick of his thumb.

#35 Capitalism Forever

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Posted 30 April 2011 - 06:02 PM

Ok how about continually leaving off the g in "ing". It kills me that the President does this all the time. "I need to be worrin' about more important issues"

Yes you do. :) This is a perfectly natural linguistic phenomenon, comparable to the use of contractions such as "isn't" or "don't" or "gonna." Similar things exist in many other languages, for example in German the word "es" is often abbreviated to "'s" and the "e" ending is often dropped from verbs, so "ich habe es" is pronounced as "ich hab's." The rationale behind these contractions and abbreviations is that they allow the same idea to be expressed with fewer sounds while still allowing the listener to understand your meaning perfectly well--in other words, they make communication more efficient.

There is no way to derive an ought a shalst from an is.





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