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My Hobby: Long Range Fishing


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#1 Abaco

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Posted 04 November 2012 - 03:51 AM

I recently returned from a trip of seven days at sea. The past few years I really got hooked (pun intended) on long range sport fishing out of San Diego. It's a challenging sport, both financially and physically. These fish pull very, very hard and we fight them standing on our feet at the rail (no chair). Some guys use a back harness. I just use a fighting belt. It is really fun to be out at sea for that long, hunting these tuna, yellow tail, and dorado. I really love it. And, I have a huge freezer that I keep loaded with lots of sashimi (unless I grille it). This photo is of my biggest fish of the trip. We had trouble finding the 100-pounders but had one stop were we landed a few 50-pounders. The fish in the photo is a yellowfin tuna. Fighting it was humbling and I was very pleased to get it on the boat. I hope to get a 200-pounder someday.

I started fishing very young for bullheads, trout, salmon, etc. For me, the hobby naturally evolved into this more extreme version.

Are there any other fishermen (or women) here? If so, tell me about it.

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There's no way to rule innocent men. --(Dr. Ferris in Atlas Shrugged)

#2 JohnRgt

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Posted 04 November 2012 - 06:50 AM

Gorgeous catch!

Do you guys keep the tuna or, like one of my former bosses, sell them to the Japanese to cover the astronomical diesel bill?
Fear is the passion of slaves. -- Patrick Henry

#3 Carlos

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Posted 04 November 2012 - 03:19 PM

That's awesome! Sounds like a lot of fun!

#4 Abaco

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Posted 04 November 2012 - 04:28 PM

Gorgeous catch!

Do you guys keep the tuna or, like one of my former bosses, sell them to the Japanese to cover the astronomical diesel bill?

I eat my catch. It's illegal for sport-caught fish to be sold. However, I imagine some of that is done.
There's no way to rule innocent men. --(Dr. Ferris in Atlas Shrugged)

#5 L-C

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Posted 04 November 2012 - 05:14 PM

You make your own sashimi? Sounds like a great way to get the weekly dose of marine lipids. Just mind the heavy metals. :)

#6 JohnRgt

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Posted 04 November 2012 - 06:14 PM

A little wasabi aioli on that . . . my God!
Fear is the passion of slaves. -- Patrick Henry

#7 Joss Delage

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Posted 05 November 2012 - 03:01 AM

You make your own sashimi? Sounds like a great way to get the weekly dose of marine lipids. Just mind the heavy metals. :)


Fish is so rich in selenium that you're generally safe. The selenium more than offset the mercury. The only stuff you shouldn't eat is whale meat, shark, and maybe king mackerel & swordfish.

Sounds like a fun hobby. I already have too many hobbies I can't afford (in time and money...) I really like raw fish. I like sashimi & sushi, but I also love the various forms of ceviche: raw fish, coriander seeds, jalapeno, sweet onion, and lime juice - awesomeness.
"The greatest productive force is human selfishness."
Robert A. Heinlein

#8 Abaco

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Posted 05 November 2012 - 04:47 AM

Fish is so rich in selenium that you're generally safe. The selenium more than offset the mercury. The only stuff you shouldn't eat is whale meat, shark, and maybe king mackerel & swordfish.


Yes, I'm not worried. I spoke with a researcher at the local university who has studied mercury levels in line-caught sport fish (including tuna). I also have spoken with a local lab operator who tests fish. Another fish worth avoiding is tilefish (whatever that is). Locally, here in the Sierra foothills, one should rarely eat bass. Also, large trout in many watersheds are also contaminated with high levels of mercury. Frankly, I think the media coverage on tuna and mercury is a environmental ploy to get people to stop eating tuna. It's simply not founded in science.

I must say that, after a trip, when I eat plenty of this fish regularly I feel very good. Mentally, I feel quicker.
There's no way to rule innocent men. --(Dr. Ferris in Atlas Shrugged)

#9 Joss Delage

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Posted 05 November 2012 - 02:07 PM

Well, fish does contain mercury - that's not false - but it's more than balanced in selenium as far as sea fish are concerned. Fresh water fish doesn't have the same level of selenium, so if they come from a contaminated lake they should be avoided.
"The greatest productive force is human selfishness."
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#10 L-C

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Posted 05 November 2012 - 03:12 PM

What if you get the selenium from other sources such as brazil nuts?

#11 Joss Delage

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Posted 06 November 2012 - 01:34 AM

Brazil nuts are legit. I don't know how they compare with fish in terms of density.
"The greatest productive force is human selfishness."
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#12 ruveyn ben yosef

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Posted 07 November 2012 - 04:30 PM

I recently returned from a trip of seven days at sea. The past few years I really got hooked (pun intended) on long range sport fishing out of San Diego. It's a challenging sport, both financially and physically. These fish pull very, very hard and we fight them standing on our feet at the rail (no chair). Some guys use a back harness. I just use a fighting belt. It is really fun to be out at sea for that long, hunting these tuna, yellow tail, and dorado. I really love it. And, I have a huge freezer that I keep loaded with lots of sashimi (unless I grille it). This photo is of my biggest fish of the trip. We had trouble finding the 100-pounders but had one stop were we landed a few 50-pounders. The fish in the photo is a yellowfin tuna. Fighting it was humbling and I was very pleased to get it on the boat. I hope to get a 200-pounder someday.

I started fishing very young for bullheads, trout, salmon, etc. For me, the hobby naturally evolved into this more extreme version.

Are there any other fishermen (or women) here? If so, tell me about it.


Are you going to eat that fish all by yourself?

ruveyn

#13 A N Other

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 09:47 PM

I've wanted to go offshore for a long time. My wife and I always charter out of the Port of Canaveral during our two weeks in Cocoa Beach and the past several years have fished for cobia. With no floating weeds last year, we looked for manta rays. We caught our limit of (about) 50 pound cobia (one fish apiece, including our captain) off one big manta ray. He was swimming along with long brown stripes on his back. Our captain bounced a lure off the manta's back and one of the brown stripes peeled off to hit it. What a blast! Other fish we take are triple tail, a fish we'd never heard of before ($25 per pound in the port!). We also fish off the beach for pompano. If you've never fished in the ocean, take the opportunity if you get it!

#14 Abaco

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Posted 17 November 2012 - 04:01 AM


I recently returned from a trip of seven days at sea. The past few years I really got hooked (pun intended) on long range sport fishing out of San Diego. It's a challenging sport, both financially and physically. These fish pull very, very hard and we fight them standing on our feet at the rail (no chair). Some guys use a back harness. I just use a fighting belt. It is really fun to be out at sea for that long, hunting these tuna, yellow tail, and dorado. I really love it. And, I have a huge freezer that I keep loaded with lots of sashimi (unless I grille it). This photo is of my biggest fish of the trip. We had trouble finding the 100-pounders but had one stop were we landed a few 50-pounders. The fish in the photo is a yellowfin tuna. Fighting it was humbling and I was very pleased to get it on the boat. I hope to get a 200-pounder someday.

I started fishing very young for bullheads, trout, salmon, etc. For me, the hobby naturally evolved into this more extreme version.

Are there any other fishermen (or women) here? If so, tell me about it.


Are you going to eat that fish all by yourself?

ruveyn

Yes, pretty much. I caught about 7 of them and I'll eat a majority of that meat over a year or so. I also brought home about 15 big yellowtail. That fish in the photo is a yellowfin tuna. We hunted for bluefin tuna our last day out but didn't get any. As I look at my diet I realize I eat a lot of fish. I probably have fish for dinner about three times per week. It's hard to explain, but I really feel good when I'm regularly eating fish.
There's no way to rule innocent men. --(Dr. Ferris in Atlas Shrugged)

#15 JohnRgt

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Posted 18 November 2012 - 01:37 AM

It's hard to explain, but I really feel good when I'm regularly eating fish.


I hear this all the time.
Fear is the passion of slaves. -- Patrick Henry

#16 Arnold

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Posted 18 November 2012 - 04:33 AM


It's hard to explain, but I really feel good when I'm regularly eating fish.


I hear this all the time.

Not from the fishes you don't.
Altruism isn't about giving a beggar a dime, it's about
whether you have the right to exist if you don't.
[ Paraphrase Ayn Rand.]
---------------------------------------
It's not that most men don't try to do the right thing.
The problem is that they don't know what the right thing is.
No Suicide Bomber doubted the rightness of his action as
being moral. This all begs for a reason based ethics.

Arnold Broese-van-Groenou

#17 Joss Delage

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Posted 18 November 2012 - 02:23 PM

It's hard to explain, but I really feel good when I'm regularly eating fish.


You get a much more balanced Omega-3 / Omega-6 mix of fatty acid in your body when you eat a lot of (sea) fish. Some claim that this is conducive to a lower level of low grade systemic inflamation, etc. Plenty of vit. D in fish too, and minerals you don't get in the standard american diet.

We're used to thinking of tuna as a fish with little oil because of the cheap canned tuna, but there's plenty of O-3 in tuna if you're careful how you handle it.
"The greatest productive force is human selfishness."
Robert A. Heinlein

#18 L-C

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Posted 18 November 2012 - 04:21 PM

I've read a lot about inflammation from the Paleo folks but I don't know what it refers to in this context. Is there quick and objective primer on it?

#19 JohnRgt

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Posted 19 November 2012 - 05:15 PM

Not from the fishes you don't.


"I often thing fish must get awfully tired of seafood. What are your thoughts, Hobson?"
Fear is the passion of slaves. -- Patrick Henry

#20 JohnRgt

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Posted 27 November 2012 - 09:19 PM

Posted Image

That's a 1000-pound bluefin, a catch that will yield about 20K pieces of sushi (the record stands at 1,496lbs)

http://www.grindtv.c...eight in sushi/
Fear is the passion of slaves. -- Patrick Henry




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